Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

The forum is currently undergoing maintenance and is in a 'read-only' mode for the time being. Sorry for the inconvenience.


  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Time for a New Miller

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Time for a New Miller

    Well took some advice and posted my barely used 2007 model Millermatic 140 with auto-set on craigslist for sale. I posted it at around 2am and was getting emails about it within an hour.
    Within 2 days I had it sold for $625 to a nice guy who drove 3 hours to pick it up.

    So now I am welderless and need to buy a new one that will handle 1/4" steel with ease. Will be welding H-beams 0.170" to 0.230" thick and will be welding 1/4" plate to them for anchoring to the cement slab. Also considering putting a 1/4" plate at the top of the column and laying the H-beam across it and welding in place so more surface area to weld to. Not 100% if that will help much though.

    Setup will be 8ft in the air. So for Mig, I will need to put the unit on a table or something to get enough lead length.

    My background is with stick welding, but a new CST 280 will leave me with only about a $100 left over for materials and I need to keep about $600 for steel for my project. Plus the Miller deals right now are only on Migs.

    Before I sold the 140, I was really planning on looking for a CST 280 used and went and bought new welding leads ground and electrode holder for a stick welder. So I just have those sitting in a box.

    I was planning on getting a CST 280 sometime since it has the preset dig settings for 7018 and 6010 (my favorite multipurpose rod). I'm curious to see how much smoother an inverter welder like the CST 280 will run a 6010 versus a +30 year old Miller Dialarc (what I grew up using).

    With Miller's 15% off special I am looking at the Millermatic 211 or the Millermatic 200. Not sure how these compare. I really like the option for the Spoolgun to run aluminum (something I couldn't really do with stick).

    Is one of these 2 mig welders a much better Mig welder than the other?

    Is the Millermatic 200 a subpar stick welder compared to the CST 280?

    If the Millermatic 200 is not an ideal stick welder for 6010 rods, then it won't cut it for me to spend the extra $$$ for a feature not useful.

    I've only tig welded about 5mins ever, but I spend a lot of time at work hand soldering stuff most people use a magnify glass to look at. So my hand eye coordination is pretty good and I play drums, so my foot coordination isn't too bad either.

    Just need to find an awesome setup for thick and thin materials. Will wait to get the second welder later if needed, but want to take advantage of the Miller discounts while they are available.

    Does the Millermatic 200 have dig and auto hot-start features?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by clint738; 03-11-2013, 01:07 PM.

  • #2
    Anyone know how a Multimatic 200 compares to Millermatic 211 as far as Mig welding?

    Are they the same, one a little better/easier to setup or switch between setups?

    Is the Multimatic that great of a stick welder for 6010 and 7018 rods?

    Don't know if I should spend the money for the Multimatic or get the 211 and save for a REAL stick welder like the CST 280.

    Comment


    • #3
      Put the project on hold until you save up enough money to get the welder you really want.... rushing into things never is the best policy... if the project can be put off I would do so.

      Comment


      • #4
        As far as I am concerned, the 200 isn't a option for stick. The CST 280 is 150 amps at 100 %, The 200 at 150 amps is 30 %.
        I don't think you can get a better stick machine then the CST 280. We got a bunch at work and are great not to mention mine at home.
        Buy the 211 with rebate deal and save for the CST 280.
        The 211 is 150 amps at 30 % and the 200 is 150 amps at 20 %. If duty cycle isn't a issue I guess you can flip a coin for it.
        Talk to your supplier and see what he can work out on the 211 and the 280.

        Comment


        • #5
          Are you buying new?
          have you ever thought about buying used?
          you can get a used Xmt 304 cc/cv for about $1500 and a feeder for about $500
          Just make sure the Xmt is 1/3 phase

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Amc724 View Post
            Are you buying new?
            have you ever thought about buying used?
            you can get a used Xmt 304 cc/cv for about $1500 and a feeder for about $500
            Just make sure the Xmt is 1/3 phase
            I prefer to buy as new as I can unless the price is right and the welders condition is pretty good.

            What is so good about a XMT 304? Looks like a lot more required to Mig with it.
            Last edited by clint738; 03-11-2013, 09:54 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Time for a New Miller

              I would just get the 211. The multimatic 200 is just an enduro of welding, not great at one task but will do it all.
              Just my .02

              Comment


              • #8
                I guess I was wondering about the multimatic 200 since it has the stick option and I would think I could maybe weld the structural H-beam 0.230" thick with 1/8" 6010 and 3/32" 7018 since it is limited to 150 amps on stick.

                Just never heard of anyone Mig welding structural steel before, so I don't know if it will be problem for the Millermatic 211 running .035 wire as recommended by the chart here:
                http://store.cyberweld.com/choosewire.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Mig is used each and everyday for structural. It's becoming preferred on large jobs due to the large waste caused by stick.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Cgotto6 View Post
                    Mig is used each and everyday for structural. It's becoming preferred on large jobs due to the large waste caused by stick.
                    Can you give some examples.. and how big are the machines needed for stuff 1/4" thick?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I like and stay with Miller products.... I would get a MM212 and be done with it. You never know what's coming through the door, having a bigger machine around is never a bad idea.
                      http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00456
                      Last edited by tackit; 03-13-2013, 12:07 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by tackit View Post
                        I like and stay with Miller products.... I would get a MM212 and be done with it. You never know what's coming through the door, having a bigger machine around is never a bad idea.
                        http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00456
                        I prefer to stay with Miller if I can. What makes the 212 worth $1,000 more than the 211 ?

                        The 211 and the 212 both go to 210Amps max

                        211 - 210amp @ 15% duty cycle
                        212 - 210amps @ 30% duty cycle

                        With the 211 I can use 8" or 4" spools of wire available local at tractor supply, versus the 212 I have no clue if it can use a 8" spool or if I am stuck having to find 12" spools somewhere ???

                        211 Plus
                        - Portable - 120V option -- could take somewhere with flux core to fix something.
                        - lower cost so I could also buy the spoolgun for aluminum too.
                        - same max amps as the 212 for lower cost
                        - Miller has 15% off on 211 right now

                        211 Negative
                        - shorter mig lead (but welder can be moved easy and put on a homemade cart)
                        - only 15% duty cycle at 210 amps, will have to take more breaks


                        212 Plus
                        - longer mig leads (15ft)
                        - slightly longer duty cycle
                        - fan on demand (quieter and less contaminate intake)
                        - spoolgun option for 212 has a longer 20ft cable for more reach

                        212 Negative
                        - heavy and not portable (could not roll outside without wheels getting stuck)
                        - $1000 more and still will not weld thicker material than the 211


                        Also found this about the wire speeds, but since I'm not a Mig guy, not sure what benefit this is ??

                        212 Wire Feed
                        Speed
                        50–700 IPM
                        (1.3–17.8
                        m/min)

                        211 Wire Feed
                        Speed
                        60–540 IPM
                        (1.5 –13.7
                        m/min)

                        What is the benefit of 160 more inches per minute? Would this mainly be a benefit when working with aluminum?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If i wanted a welder for in the shop it would be a 212 where the duty cycle would be better. If i wanted a welder i could lug around it would be a 211. Thats why there are choices because some people don't just want one. I have the older MM 185 with spoolgun and i take it outside all the time with a longer cord but i don't haul my cylinder on the rack as i have 3 of them chained to the wall by the door and just pick which one i need, i have a 25' hose hooked to my welder. It does make the welder a lot easier to move around....Bob
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by aametalmaster; 03-13-2013, 03:20 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Time for a New Miller

                            Just my 2 cents, but I'd say go as heavy as you can on your machine buy. It seems like you lose some of the speed advantages of Mig when you get down in the low duty cycles.

                            I've been welding some heavy projects at my shop with a cp302, and similar stuff at a friends with his 211, and it is definitely much less effort to
                            get a consistently good result with the big machine (night and day). Flange and face thickness are one thing, but that transition area between the two can
                            have a lot of meat in it, especially on standard beams, vs wide flange.

                            Going slow, stitching, preheating - will all help, but for me, at some point in there I'd rather be in a stick setup with power to spare, if thats an option, as it sometimes is,
                            based on costs.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by usjess View Post
                              Just my 2 cents, but I'd say go as heavy as you can on your machine buy. It seems like you lose some of the speed advantages of Mig when you get down in the low duty cycles.

                              I've been welding some heavy projects at my shop with a cp302, and similar stuff at a friends with his 211, and it is definitely much less effort to
                              get a consistently good result with the big machine (night and day). Flange and face thickness are one thing, but that transition area between the two can
                              have a lot of meat in it, especially on standard beams, vs wide flange.

                              Going slow, stitching, preheating - will all help, but for me, at some point in there I'd rather be in a stick setup with power to spare, if thats an option, as it sometimes is,
                              based on costs.
                              I pretty much did like your saying. Went with all the machine I could. I will save for the materials next since I have other things taking up time before I do my big project.

                              I bought a new MM252 a few weeks ago and have tinkered with it the past 2 weekends. It is such a major improvement over my mm140 I sold. Was welding in 3" strap to the 8" c-purlin frame of my shop building to install a new 240V 60A dedicated receptical for the welder. Was using the existing hookup in the shop to run the welder.

                              I am really liking the results. Settings seemed a little off for the 1/8" strap when I used the chart settings of 17.4V 230IPM.
                              So when I went to weld the 1/8" strap to the 14ga c-purlin I adjusted things down a little bit to 17.2V 210IPM. Was very pleased with the results of the flat welds and horizontal overhead welds it producted and have a nice heat signature line across the c-purlin indicating adequate penetration for securing the receptacle.

                              The more I use the welder the more I am enjoying it.

                              For welding outside, I visited home and picked up an Airco Easy Arc 250A AC/DC stick welder.
                              https://www.dropbox.com/sh/yoidubb9ai7k9z2/O-UCm0J0AB

                              This was the welder I first learned to strike an arc with when I was 7. I noticed one board has a lead from a capacitor broke off. Could have broke loose over the years from being moved to and from places. I plan to solder it back in place and see how the welder runs.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.