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About The 180 TIG material thickness

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  • About The 180 TIG material thickness

    The spec sheet says it can handle up to .1875" thick (3/16) .
    In your experience is this an absolute upper limit in material thickness or can you use it to get adequate penetration for thicker material (steel and alum) by going slower?

  • #2
    I think the trick here is multiple passes of proper rated penetration and correct overlap of beads.

    Comment


    • #3
      About The 180 TIG material thickness

      Almost all machines are under rated and if you know some tricks the ability of a machine is really high. Example I have Tig welded 2 in. thick aluminum with a dynasty 350.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think the trick here is multiple passes of proper rated penetration and correct overlap of beads.
        Is that with the caveat of needing a sufficiently large bevel ground onto the edges? So the weld starts at the bottom of the V and as one gets to the wider parts the welds are welded to the welds to bridge the gap?


        Almost all machines are under rated and if you know some tricks the ability of a machine is really high. Example I have Tig welded 2 in. thick aluminum with a dynasty 350.
        Tricks. Hmmm. 2" is a lot of aluminum. You had to pre-heat that substantially, I'm guessing. Was someone playing a rosebud torch (or two) on it even while you were welding it?


        I am planning on a welder purchase and am pretty confident in my eye-hand-foot coordination and don't want the spark fest' of a MIG (I have a somewhat flammable environment) plus I do want to be able to weld exotics occasionally as well as thin stuff along with steel assemblies with material occasionally as thick as 3/8" (doubt seriously I'll ever see anything thicker) but usually 1/4" and thinner, so I think a TIG, in spite of the learning curve, will be the better choice. So I'm torn between the 165 and 180.

        Unfortunately there is no opportunity for me to try out any equipment, I just have to pay my money and play the game. If I get the 165 it's no big deal to have only 230 as my voltage input. So then the question of whether that extra 30 amps output is all that meaningful is really the only one remaining.
        What I don't spend on the welder I can spend on a good helmet, gloves, and other accessories.


        Would you trust your eyesight to an autodarkening helmet like the Jackson Trusight or the Save Phase black ice? God only gave me two eyes. I've seen what happens when one doesn't don't cover up fast enough. It wasn't pretty. Fear-of-god and all that.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Raul McCai View Post
          Is that with the caveat of needing a sufficiently large bevel ground onto the edges? So the weld starts at the bottom of the V and as one gets to the wider parts the welds are welded to the welds to bridge the gap?




          Tricks. Hmmm. 2" is a lot of aluminum. You had to pre-heat that substantially, I'm guessing. Was someone playing a rosebud torch (or two) on it even while you were welding it?


          I am planning on a welder purchase and am pretty confident in my eye-hand-foot coordination and don't want the spark fest' of a MIG (I have a somewhat flammable environment) plus I do want to be able to weld exotics occasionally as well as thin stuff along with steel assemblies with material occasionally as thick as 3/8" (doubt seriously I'll ever see anything thicker) but usually 1/4" and thinner, so I think a TIG, in spite of the learning curve, will be the better choice. So I'm torn between the 165 and 180.

          Unfortunately there is no opportunity for me to try out any equipment, I just have to pay my money and play the game. If I get the 165 it's no big deal to have only 230 as my voltage input. So then the question of whether that extra 30 amps output is all that meaningful is really the only one remaining.
          What I don't spend on the welder I can spend on a good helmet, gloves, and other accessories.


          Would you trust your eyesight to an autodarkening helmet like the Jackson Trusight or the Save Phase black ice? God only gave me two eyes. I've seen what happens when one doesn't don't cover up fast enough. It wasn't pretty. Fear-of-god and all that.
          Where are you located? Maybe someone on here has a 180 that is close by, and will let you check it out.

          Comment


          • #6
            NW corner of Hunterdon County NJ.
            I thought about taking a welding course at the local Voc' Tech, which would be the ideal way to go, but the county college wants $4-Gees for the two courses. I don't want a cert', I just need to do my own stuff.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a 165 with foot pedal if you want to come try it out. I'm 20 minutes south of the parkway bridge...
              Originally posted by Raul McCai View Post
              NW corner of Hunterdon County NJ.
              I thought about taking a welding course at the local Voc' Tech, which would be the ideal way to go, but the county college wants $4-Gees for the two courses. I don't want a cert', I just need to do my own stuff.

              Comment


              • #8
                I live in Lincoln Park N.J. You should check out Hunterton cty Vo Tech to see if they have welding classes. They would be a lot cheaper if they do. I do know that morris cty and passaic cty offer adult education classes.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I did union county votech....good stuff....won't teach you the trade but will show you the basics and millerwelds.com can help u figure out the rest.
                  Originally posted by JMK WELDING View Post
                  I live in Lincoln Park N.J. You should check out Hunterton cty Vo Tech to see if they have welding classes. They would be a lot cheaper if they do. I do know that morris cty and passaic cty offer adult education classes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JMK WELDING View Post
                    I live in Lincoln Park N.J. You should check out Hunterton cty Vo Tech to see if they have welding classes. They would be a lot cheaper if they do. I do know that morris cty and passaic cty offer adult education classes.
                    Morris hasn't got anyone doing any welding at the moment.
                    Welding is not the most common offering. Most schools seem not to offer courses ala cart but rather want a full course of study. I was done with formal education a while ago: went all the way and got the full monty.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If you just want to know if a 180 class tig machine can do thicker than 3/16" the amswer is yes. I got by for years using a Lincoln 175 square wave tig. I commonly welded 1/4" aluminum with occasionaly thicker. Use of pre heat & bevels works wonders. The biggest issue was the duty cycle. If I wasn'
                      t careful the machine would shut down. Once in a while I'd pop a 50 amp breaker also.

                      Any machine in this class is almost the same as far as output. Lincoln upped theirs to a 225 amp & Miller to a 200 amp. At max output the duty cycle was stupidly low. You can only get so much out of a 50 amp breaker with a transformer based machine.

                      The above applies to transformer based machines.
                      Last edited by MMW; 03-10-2013, 07:45 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If your talking about the diversion welders, the 165 & 180 are both rated the same. 150 amps at 20% duty cycle. The 180 duty cycle at max is 10%. Not very good. So even though you get an extra 15 amps it's only good for 1 minute out of 10.

                        With aluminum there really is no substitute for amps.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by turbo38t View Post
                          I have a 165 with foot pedal if you want to come try it out. I'm 20 minutes south of the parkway bridge...
                          Kind of you to offer.
                          How thick have you welded with it?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Check this out. Anyone have any feed back about this machine? It's a thermal arc 186. 200amp. Square wave, ac/dc tig stick and a little higher duty cycle than miller diversion with a lot more options.
                            It's a toss up for me because I'm a miller guy and think they have a good product.




                            http://m.cyberweld.com/tharc186acti.html

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have welded 3/16 with it. Wouldn't weld more than 1/8 with any seriousness. Very nice on 1/8 but duty cycle or not how much aluminum r u really going to weld with an air cooles torch?
                              Originally posted by Raul McCai View Post
                              Kind of you to offer.
                              How thick have you welded with it?

                              Comment

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