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Need Constructive criticism...

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  • Need Constructive criticism...

    New to the site. Looking for criticism on my welding. Keep in mind that I have never done this before. I got the urge to weld after going through some of the post here. I do have to say that is not as easy as I thought it would be. I use an AC welder and 6013 3/32. All I did was drag the rod no motion at all. So please be as honest as possible. Thank you.

    E.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Not bad for the first time. Looks like you could increase your amps a bit a use a slower travel speed. I just used some 6013 a few days ago. Nice rod on AC.

    Comment


    • #3
      I agree with a little higher amperage. Something to be practicing is keeping your bead dead straight. It will come with practice. Also being relaxed and comfortable will help while learning.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by kvwall View Post
        Not bad for the first time. Looks like you could increase your amps a bit a use a slower travel speed. I just used some 6013 a few days ago. Nice rod on AC.

        Thank you, I had the amp at 115; how much more should I have used? and how do I determine the travel speed?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by elvis View Post
          I agree with a little higher amperage. Something to be practicing is keeping your bead dead straight. It will come with practice. Also being relaxed and comfortable will help while learning.

          Thank you.

          Comment


          • #6
            Judging travel speed takes practice, just slow down a little and see what it looks like.

            However, I think it looks great for your first time.

            Dont be to discouraged when you go to do a verticle up weld ( That takes alot more practice ).

            Comment


            • #7
              Turn up the heat. You should concentrate on watching your puddle. As you watch the puddle form and fill into the weld area you will be able to better judge your travel speed which appears to be too slow. You are doing well for just starting.

              Comment


              • #8
                They look alot better than my first beads. Just keep practicing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Getting started

                  There is nothing funner than learning to stick weld. Once you figure out your heat setting and travel speed you can start to play with weld motions. After time and lots of beads laid down you can look back and see all the differences in outcome. When you finally get a great bead and think you have it down try again! It's funny how while learning to weld your finished product can vary so much. Keep at it and stay comfortable as you work and take your time. Just have fun with it and your skills will follow

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                  • #10
                    Brace yourself against the welding table or something solid and use two arms to weld with. Hold/brace the arm holding the stinger with your free hand to steady your welding hand, you'll gain more control. I've hung pipe wrenches on pipe to get a steady rest for my free arm. Stay at the top of the weld long enough to fill the creator before moving ahead so you don't have undercut. Make good solid tacks always.

                    Try different heat settings and travel speeds until your weld looks good, has no porosity and good penetration. Practice, practice, practice.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      6013 is not a rod that people burning rod for a living will use, the thing that makes it a good starter rod is that is is easy to restart, it has no digging qualities, notice the slag pocket that wont go away, when you get that, stop and grind it out, you also would be better served upping the rod size to one eight, 3/32 is a ***** in any form compared to the same rod of greater size. good looking welds though, have fun, it takes time

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Need Constructive criticism...

                        I like what Kevin said. 1/8 rod would be a lot better. Learn control as you find the right settings and you will see a difference. There are rods used on a daily basis that take practice and knowledge along with time.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not bad for your first attempt. As others said, I would increase your heat to try to get a "flatter" weld profile and get the "toes" (sides) to "wet in" a little better.

                          You might also want to try some more "standard" rods for learning, since those will be the ones you end up using most – 6011 and 7018 (you'll need 7018AC for an AC-only machine). I'm not a big fan of 6013.

                          Keep at it and good luck.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            good point on going to 7018 and 6011, those are the bread and butter rods of stick welding, those 2 rods have different welding techniques, one is a drag, the other, 6011, is a whip, learning 6011 is very important, once you get good, with 6011, you can do more than just weld with it, you can trim steel with the rod, i could go on and on , you get the point

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                            • #15
                              I'm not fond of AC stick and I'm not fond of 6013 but it's a relatively easy rod to learn with and it's ideal for non-structural welds using a low cost AC power supply. It does run a little differently. The main trick to running 6013 is to run a more pronounced drag angle (30 degrees vs the usual 10-15 degrees) than you normally would with most other rods like 7018 . 6013 slag is pretty thick and sluggish, so the "more angled" drag angle helps push the slag out of the way which will help keep those slag pockets you're getiing from forming.

                              There is a video on Youtube made by TWI in England that is just about tailor-made for what you're learning. It's entirely done using a very similar light duty machine to yours and everything's done with 6013. They even have a little welding table project towards the end. Took me a minute to find it, because it's listed under MMA (UK term) instead of stick or SMAW, but here you go:

                              http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWdgEaXWDxQ

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