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miller diversion 165/180 vs. eastwood models

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  • miller diversion 165/180 vs. eastwood models

    Anybody have any opinions from experience with any of these machines? Looking for a basic tig machine. Thanks to anyone who reads!

  • #2
    Don't know where your located but a diversion 165 just came up for sale by a member here. Only a few posts back.

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    • #3
      Do you want stick too ? A Miller 180 SD or the Miller 200 syncro might be a wiser choice for more money. You would have stick too. These are floor model type.
      the Diversion is only 50 pounds where the syncro is 200. What type of work will you be doing ?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jbskateboards View Post
        Anybody have any opinions from experience with any of these machines? Looking for a basic tig machine. Thanks to anyone who reads!
        I have experience with the diversion180. From the question it seems you are a beginner, and I would recommend the diversion series tig only machine because even an idiot can set it up and weld. With the videos they give you and the idiot guide, you will be tigging in no time. The 180 being inverter, can take housecurrent as well as 230 volts. That is a big plus in my book.

        The eastwood is a chinese import with crap for a manual, so good luck.

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        • #5
          Yes i currently work as an entry level tig welder and on the side i sometimes do light fab / light repair work. My setup consists of a 10ft trailer being dragged by an 03 pathfinder and a millermatic wire feeder... poor but its all i can afford. I just love practicing the craft on the side AND for fun! wanting to ad a portable Tig and maybe a pickup (silverado vs. Ford f-series?).

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          • #6
            The Eastwood might be decent for the home hobbiest, but you'd be better off looking at some of the newer inverter machines. The Eastwood inverter has the older MOSFET electronics that have been plagued with problems. Lots of them show up DOA. All the manufactures switched to the newer IGBT electronics. Stay away from the MOSFET machines. The Diversion series are great for the beginner, but you'll probably want more features as you gain more experience.
            Last edited by wkdivr; 02-04-2013, 08:50 AM.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jbskateboards View Post
              Anybody have any opinions from experience with any of these machines? Looking for a basic tig machine. Thanks to anyone who reads!
              Yep. I've been using the Diversion 180 for a year now. I do aluminum, stainless and carbon steel with it. It's paid for itself over and over. It's light enough to go mobile. I've had it down in the hull of a yacht doing some aluminum tank repair. I've had it on a baseball field repairing a batting cage. Like everyone says, it is great for a beginner but you may want to upgrade as your skill level and needs change. I want a Dynasty 350 but don't really NEED it.

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              • #8
                Diversion 165

                I have the deverson 165 for a few years now without a problem. Used it to build a lot of projects. Many of them are in the Welding Projects site here.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kvwall View Post
                  Yep. I've been using the Diversion 180 for a year now. I do aluminum, stainless and carbon steel with it. It's paid for itself over and over. It's light enough to go mobile. I've had it down in the hull of a yacht doing some aluminum tank repair. I've had it on a baseball field repairing a batting cage. Like everyone says, it is great for a beginner but you may want to upgrade as your skill level and needs change. I want a Dynasty 350 but don't really NEED it.
                  You are welcome to come try any one of my Dynasty350s. At that point, you will defininately "Need it".

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                  • #10
                    Silverado/Fseriers Ford

                    a few years ago I was driving a FX 2002 Ford 1/2 ton my city truck and 99 GMC Sierra,country truck both were 4wd extented cab short box,both had the small v8
                    The ford sat higher,had less power,The GMC had more power and a shorter turning radius,and rusted out sooner,pick your poison.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by shovelon View Post
                      You are welcome to come try any one of my Dynasty350s. At that point, you will defininately "Need it".
                      Thanks. I use a Dynasty 350 at the college. That's how I found out I want one. I just have to finish paying off my TB302 Air-Pak first.

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