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Price check on Welding.

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  • #16
    Originally posted by mcostello View Post
    Thanks all, I am still learning as I go, and its still money to pay bills. Not a lot of work now and something beats nothing.
    Please report back how you feel you did when the job is done. Start keeping track of jobs by writing them down. I use spiral bound notebooks for this. I write down each job, hours & a brief summary of job & material. That way you can always go back to look at it for reference. Don't trust your memory.
    MM250
    Trailblazer 250g
    22a feeder
    Lincoln ac/dc 225
    Victor O/A
    MM200 black face
    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
    Arco roto-phase model M
    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
    Miller spectrum 875
    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
    Syncrowave 250
    RCCS-14

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    • #17
      I use to do a lot of wrought iron railing. Due to codes + steel increases - economy + gas prices + insurance increases = No money. The designing was the reason I got into it not the money, but I can't pay my mortgage with designing.

      I personally would have passed on the job because there are ALWAYS complications with railings. Usually they are what you don't even see like bad concrete, the town inspector/neighborhood watch lady lives next door, you forgot a tool and you have to drive 20 minutes back to shop to get it.

      As long as you are repairing the railing you can get away without any codes that have become stated since the railing was installed before. If you are making new sections and installing them in, they must be code. As this would be considered a new railing even though it is patch work. At least here in NJ it is considered that, but that is also determined by the person who alerted the insurance man. A repair is considered replacing a few pickets, cast iron designs, even a bad post. If you have to remove the railing, it is to be replaced with new to code.

      My insurance carrier actually non renewed me because I stated I "install" railings, not that I made them.

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      • #18
        insurance inspectors are aware of the 4" open space rule

        Insurance inspectors are aware of the 4" open space rule,
        and have been in my area for a good 15 years; and have
        required owners to change accordingly--a bunch of times.

        Insurance and/or code inspectors are not necessarily up
        to speed on all the other details of railings, since that requires
        reading, comprehension, study and retention.....but they
        can home in on big open spacing-quite easily.

        ....and 'no'--tying string between the pickets is not an acceptable
        method of reducing the open spacing....

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        • #19
          I am with the original poster here, be careful, do a little extra even if it cost a little when you are not busy, dont be scared to let the right people know it was you, the Lions club wouldnt get a bill from us and likely would the local school if it was something not too involved. Work they were really farming out would be another matter, in my state if I was going to hang out my shingle would be lic gen contr, easy to get, low rates, I am a farmer, I added a ryder that says basically I can take my crane over to the school and help with a routine matter, can even charge to X dollars as part time for things I wouldnt tend to need a licence for etc. Service calls on equipment I have legit expertise.

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          • #20
            Aint lived till you sued me anyway, ha, I have seen what passes for forensic witness. We saw one on a forum like this and the caption was faulty weld,, Stevie Wonder could have figured out in a couple pictures it was under designed "factory",,,,, contrary to popular belief I seen more broke factory or engineered stuff fixed with half ass welding jobs and simple design, some work forever. I saw one not too long ago, my helper looked at it and said, this is a mess but I had to point out it was a sussesful fix despite a messy appearance.

            Just short of an engineer on a common hitch modification would be me who is likely a step ahead of the avg installer at a busy uhaul. Some of those guys got good men, some is not so good, we got a good enough midas guy etc. But I saw a strengthen job a while back for a factory step bumper was perfect, my Bud had it done at another fab shop bud of his and wanted to show it to me and ask what I thought and I said,,, perfect He said, 2 hrs, he tipped his bud a hundred and a case or 2 of beer.

            It was obvious as daylight the installer/owner I bet had done this before. He could have got Stevie and Ray to testify that this was adequate by far and such a simple vast improvement, stamp or no stamp
            Last edited by Sberry; 02-03-2013, 04:01 PM.

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            • #21
              I think some of you might be over thinking this. He didn't design it. He didn't engineer it. He isn't going to install it. If he's still concerned about liability all he needs to do is tell his customer is "I can't weld this if it is a railing because it is sub code but if it is a pole bean trellis there isn't a problem." Man it sure would nice nice if I could get the kind of rates here that some of you guys take for granted.
              Sberry- I used to do a lot of work for farmers. I couldn't believe how some of them treated their equipment. My method was to build the repairs strong enough to shift the next breakage into someone else's engineering.
              Meltedmetal

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                I think some of you might be over thinking this. He didn't design it. He didn't engineer it. He isn't going to install it. If he's still concerned about liability all he needs to do is tell his customer is "I can't weld this if it is a railing because it is sub code but if it is a pole bean trellis there isn't a problem." Man it sure would nice nice if I could get the kind of rates here that some of you guys take for granted.
                Sberry- I used to do a lot of work for farmers. I couldn't believe how some of them treated their equipment. My method was to build the repairs strong enough to shift the next breakage into someone else's engineering.
                Meltedmetal
                100% agree

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by monte55 View Post
                  Not sure but since he is repairing a section and not installing all new railing, I think he can match original. If he is doing in shop and has nothing to do with installation, the panel could be for anything as far as he knows. It could be for growing vines on. Who knows. BTW...for $50, I would not bother to turn on my lights, welder, use wire and gas.
                  Not sure of where he is from but I'm pretty sure if anything is re-worked it must be brought up to current code. I know this is true for electrical, and definately if it is a rental unit...

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                  • #24
                    I have to adjust a little because not everyone here has worked on railings enough to know that its not the people who want the railing that sues, it is the old ladies that fell due to snow on the step that can't be proven, but need their hospital bills paid for.

                    EVERYTHING I have said ONLY applies IF you are the installer as well. You can build anything you want, sell anything you want, just not install anything you want.

                    I did a lot of insurance railing requirement jobs to keep home owners insured or be forced to cancel. If the insurance companies are requiring it, then it is becoming a big deal.

                    When I belonged to NOMMA (wrought iron club of america), the stories were ridiculous. The code ACTUALLY reads that a 4 3/8" cone can not pass through with a said amount of force, and a 4" rule has been a standard. BUT, there is a small paragraph at the last chapter of the code book that says.... An inspector can OVERRULE ANY code that does not meet his/her standards. This small 3 sentence paragraph over rules the entire book at the inspectors personal judgement.

                    I love wrought iron, I miss doing it a lot, but I am not losing my company because of some BS that is out of my control. With that said, there are probably a couple hundred "big" wrought iron companies out there making a living every day.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
                      I think some of you might be over thinking this. He didn't design it. He didn't engineer it.
                      Welcome to the world of wrought iron railings!

                      You have to deal with everyone else's crap like bad concrete, faulty framing, windows that were badly mounted, miss match steps, landscaping codes, changing codes (federal, state, local depending on each town), which codes are in effect at time of work (federal, state, local), is this a high children area, is this commercial/residential/public, is the neighbor ok with it (yes I have had to rework a job because of it), is it handicap accessible, does it need to meet ADA standards, ect, ect, ect.....

                      Edit: And any of this can not be added in to the bill or you will most likely lose the job due to home depot crap/plastic railings.

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                      • #26
                        Price check on Welding.

                        50$?
                        Umm!
                        My minimum charge is 330$
                        For a 1 minute job up to 3 hours!so do the maths

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Rhinox:303025
                          50$?
                          Umm!
                          My minimum charge is 330$
                          For a 1 minute job up to 3 hours!so do the maths
                          Well that's awesome.... please tell me where your located, where I can find idiots to pay that? Actually I will just keep my minimum at $75 and have lots of new happy customers...

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                          • #28
                            Price check on Welding.

                            75$/hourly?weldonman?are you in the states? Which parts? You got a truck set up and all?
                            What kind of rig do you have ?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Rhinox:303084
                              75$/hourly?weldonman?are you in the states? Which parts? You got a truck set up and all?
                              What kind of rig do you have ?
                              Delaware, two trucks a.. 2005 1/2 ton Chevy, and a late 80s f350 flatbed with a bobcat 250. Have a main rig that's on a trailer with air comp and aead 200le (which is my favorite welder of all). And a separate welder for heavy gouging Lincoln sa250 on a trailer with air comp. I also have a weld/fab shop. 75 is my road rate, 55 is my shop rate. Pretty much the same as everyone else around here

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                              • #30
                                Lot's of great discussion here! I charge $60 hr, and trip charge is $60 to show up. I could charge more as others have suggested but I get a lot of call backs. I charge $60 hr for anything I do. I don't consider myself as being a Mobile welder but I am able to get my welding equipment to the job site. There is only one other welder in my little town and he charges the same as me and is not mobile but he does have a dedicated weld shop. I only have my garage with welding table. I work full time for a Motorcycle Company as a Maintenance Mechanic (I'm Union) and I also have a locksmith Business with which I include ornamental welding as well as repairs. He had me Tig weld a Cast Aluminum Toyota Engine Block last weekend, charged for two hours labor (Prep, Preheat in oven, & weld). Whatever you decide to charge, pick a rate and stick to it. Better to ask for more and discount than to ask for too little and ask for more or take a loss. It would be neat to see more Welders get the rates higher but I'm not in a position to do it here without losing business. I don't want to be the cheapest guy in town either. If I charge too much they can always find someone cheaper. Especially with auto body where it's mostly Mig welding.

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