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MOBILE: Flatbed vs. trailer?

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  • MOBILE: Flatbed vs. trailer?

    Hello, I'm a senior in highschool i've had a side welding buisness for about 3 years now and i want to start expanding out and do more mobile trips, I have all the equipment i need to do mobile- bobcat 250, oxy/act, air compresser, miller 625 plasma cutter and hand tools, ect.. I currently have a f-250 with a rotting bed on it but i am also building a trailer for my senior project for school i've herd it is safer to put your equipment on your truck but i want to put my trailer to use. I don't mind doing either or maybe i could use the trailer for hauling steel and use the truck as a welding rig only. Comments and ideas please!!!

  • #2
    I have my Trailblazer 302 in my truck. It's great for going to San Francisco and other placed where parking is nonexistent. But sometimes I wish it was in a trailer so I can load my motorcycles up in the truck again.

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    • #3
      Mount everything on a skid. That's what I've done for better than 40 years. I like to have a pickup when I need it. 5-10 minutes, a come-a-long and a overhead hoist setup.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jessp View Post
        Mount everything on a skid. That's what I've done for better than 40 years. I like to have a pickup when I need it. 5-10 minutes, a come-a-long and a overhead hoist setup.
        good idea i have a skidsteer i could use to load and unload

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        • #5
          Agree on the skid if not a permanent welding rig. Putting a mobile skid together it is the only way to do it.

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          • #6
            If using the truck & it is a single rear wheel be careful as it can be easily over weight especially if you build a heavy flatbed or skid.

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            • #7
              Welder + fuel (700 lbs), leads (75 lbs [length?] ), welding rod (25), grinders (25 lbs), torch set-up (200 lbs), hand tools (50 lbs), compressor small (75 lbs)

              About 1200 lbs without the steel for the job, plus skid. That can get heavy but it isn't too bad. If you make a custom bed for your truck, you will add a lot more weight then the OEM bed. This will add even more weight to the springs.

              If you are doing this as a "side business" and mainly weekends, I would do a skid mount in the truck. Trailers are great but that is best when you need lots of tooling with a smaller truck. I suggest getting helper springs or even add another leaf.

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              • #8
                My welding rig doubles as my fam-mobile so to i use an 18 ft trailer for most mobile, but there have been times ive had move the tb to the truck because i wasn't able to get 38 ft of truck and trailer into a jobsite. When i can afford a work only rig ill go truck mount. And you will always need more storage space so trailer has benefits
                -Steve

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                • #9
                  If I was working regular mount as much equipment in the truck as practical, invest in a Maxstar type unit to toss behind the seat and small skid the welder for when I absolutely had to have it. I woud tend to want to rig this up for a common pickup, the Ford is likely has rotted out cross members in the box (can stick sign posts beside the old ones, ha) but truck changes are no big deal if you make some stuff standard.
                  Attached Files

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                  • #10
                    The 80 cf will mount with LP tank for cut weld on one skid for a pickup.
                    Attached Files

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                    • #11
                      I used to tote engine drive but really dont need it, if I do I take another heavy truck that has one as well as bigger torch set. I can do 99% of it anymore from pickup truck especially with battery tools, occasional inverter use. I hardly use a torch, tend to want to carry one though. Got hi power battery sawzall, ha. Learn to be simple, I used to try and cary everything, now I have a grip on what I use most, double purpose a lot. I carry the basics, load on the special per job.
                      Attached Files

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                      • #12
                        Skid set up will free truck up quicker loading and unloading, skid could always go on trailer too. What size is your trailer going to be. Single axle ???

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                        • #13
                          A big deal is the tool box that rides where its easiest to get, dont have to did for many common items, can put a nut driver and razor knife in pocket as I leave truck.
                          Attached Files

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                          • #14
                            Majority of the sites we work at barely have enough room to get the rigs turned around without a trailer on them, got stuck twice this past week.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Country Metals View Post
                              Welder + fuel (700 lbs), leads (75 lbs [length?] ), welding rod (25), grinders (25 lbs), torch set-up (200 lbs), hand tools (50 lbs), compressor small (75 lbs)

                              About 1200 lbs without the steel for the job, plus skid. That can get heavy but it isn't too bad. If you make a custom bed for your truck, you will add a lot more weight then the OEM bed. This will add even more weight to the springs.

                              If you are doing this as a "side business" and mainly weekends, I would do a skid mount in the truck. Trailers are great but that is best when you need lots of tooling with a smaller truck. I suggest getting helper springs or even add another leaf.
                              it is a single wheel and i was planning on rebuilding the leaf spring shackles and taking the 6 in. lift kit out of it too. skid is a great idea thanks.

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