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Millermatic 211 issue

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  • Millermatic 211 issue

    IF you look at the pic I posted you can tell there is an issue. Im using the machine in 220, and cannot get it set correctly, its like the arc is erratic and not concentrated at the tip of the wire. When in the puddle the arc seems to be drifting. Its creating a lot of spatter and awful beads. Now when i use it on 110 everything is the way its suppose to be, I can dial it in perfectly and I get great results. I am relatively new to welding, and this is the first 220 welder i have owned, my first was the mm140 which i layed down some great beads with. My question is is it me or the machine, or another culprit? Also i wish i knew the volts and ipm instead of the numbers provided so i could be more precise.Name:  df5db20df3cdf749641475bf0414b480.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  7.9 KB

  • #2
    Several things appear to be required before we can help you in any meaningful way.

    Post a better pic. A pic that is only an inch and a half wide and depicts a dozen or so welds is not sufficient. Resize your pic such that it is 800 pixels wide.

    Open the door and look above the drive rolls and tell us if the ground clamp lead is connected to + or - and what kind of wire you are using and which shield gas if applicable.
    Last edited by Matrix; 11-12-2012, 08:48 AM.

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    • #3
      Double check your 220 input, make sure it is 220 and not 208. Make sure you are wired L1-black, L2- white and green to ground.

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      • #4
        Yours is not the only one with this type of problem
        Search MM211

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        • #5
          new pic

          Name:  2a07a4e7e27a005d69f010a10c052c54.jpg
Views: 1
Size:  48.9 KB


          Im using C25 gas and 70s6 .035" size wire. My metal was clean so thats not the issue, all though the picture doesnt look that way. The edges of the weld are so inconsistent and just plain bad. It doesnt feel, sound or obviously look right. I cant send welds out of my shop that someone has paid for that look like this. When im on 110 I have no issues at all. I build cattle gates and home gates and the welds are right in the customers face.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by weldbay View Post
            Double check your 220 input, make sure it is 220 and not 208. Make sure you are wired L1-black, L2- white and green to ground.
            Unless he has 208 3 phase, thats unlikely to be the problem, s 200 and 208 doesn't come in single phase only. So the op problably has 230.

            Unlikely to be wired any differnt on L 1 & 2. and ground as the 120 vac setting would be out to lunch.

            Besides problem has little to do with the input.

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            • #7
              Thanks cruizer but I thought the 211 came 120/230 only. Now I don not know about Canada but we have a lot of 208. Does 208 only occur in 3 phase supply to a shop?

              My L1/L2 reference is if one lead is bad he will still get 110 but not 230.

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              • #8
                Any Ideas

                I have read that the arc is harsh when on 220 but the way its welding cant be the way it was designed to perform. Should I try calling support? I will say i am running it on a 30 amp breaker that has a dryer plug socket, i made an extension cord to adapt to the 6-50 that's on the machine. I dont know if there's anything that could cause these issues from that set up but thought i would mention. An electrician is coming and wiring up a new panel in the shop this week, so maybe the issue will resolve itself..hahaha doubt it!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by weldbay View Post
                  Thanks cruizer but I thought the 211 came 120/230 only. Now I don not know about Canada but we have a lot of 208. Does 208 only occur in 3 phase supply to a shop?

                  My L1/L2 reference is if one lead is bad he will still get 110 but not 230.
                  You won't find 208v in a residential service.

                  120/208v is 3 phase where you get 120v phase to neutral and 208v between phases.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by weldbay View Post
                    Thanks cruizer but I thought the 211 came 120/230 only. Now I don not know about Canada but we have a lot of 208. Does 208 only occur in 3 phase supply to a shop?

                    My L1/L2 reference is if one lead is bad he will still get 110 but not 230

                    .
                    We have alot of 200 and 208 as the 230 transformers are rather expensive in 3 phase, so no your not going to get 200 or 208 in single phase, least wise in north america.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by millermetalworx View Post
                      I have read that the arc is harsh when on 220 but the way its welding cant be the way it was designed to perform. Should I try calling support? I will say i am running it on a 30 amp breaker that has a dryer plug socket, i made an extension cord to adapt to the 6-50 that's on the machine. I dont know if there's anything that could cause these issues from that set up but thought i would mention. An electrician is coming and wiring up a new panel in the shop this week, so maybe the issue will resolve itself..hahaha doubt it!
                      Double check your extension cord, it's possible you did wire in wrong.

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                      • #12
                        really?

                        I mean is that really possible? Its basically 2 hots and a ground the voltage doesnt care what color the wires are, right? I mean i wouldnt be getting the difference in power if the voltage wasnt different. IDK, ijust want a definitive answer voltage or machine or operator.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by millermetalworx View Post
                          I mean is that really possible? Its basically 2 hots and a ground the voltage doesnt care what color the wires are, right? I mean i wouldnt be getting the difference in power if the voltage wasnt different. IDK, ijust want a definitive answer voltage or machine or operator.
                          The MM211 will run on 208v just fine, I've done it.

                          Can't hurt to check the ext. cord wiring.

                          And it could be a bad machine. As I mentioned earlier yours is not the first case of a 211 not working properly on 240v but working on 120v.

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for setting me straight on the 208, we have a lot of shops that are in industrial parks that have 208 did not think they had 3-phase.

                            As for the plug, I do not know who wired is shop but you use the same three wire for 120 as you do for 220 you just wire the breaker different.

                            As for the mach, try it in manual and in auto set, if does not work in either of them PC1 could be bad.

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                            • #15
                              I realize that I have to prove myself here all the time. On the other hand it is reassuring to find that I am not always wrong:

                              Electrical Hadbook:

                              In some multiple-unit residential buildings of North America, three-phase power is supplied to the building but individual units have only single-phase power formed from two of the three supply phases. Lighting and convenience receptacles are connected from either phase conductor to neutral, giving the usual 120 V required by typical North American appliances. In the split-phase system, high-power loads are connected between the opposite "hot" poles, giving a voltage of 240 V. In some cases, they may be connected between phases of a three-phase system, giving a voltage of 208 V. This practice is common enough that 208 V single-phase equipment is readily available in North America. Attempts to use the more common 120/240 V equipment intended for split-phase distribution may result in poor performance since 240 V heating and lighting equipment will only produce 75% of its rating when operated at 208 V. Motors rated at 240 V will draw higher current at 208 V; some motors are dual-labelled for both voltages.

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