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need advices to become a welder

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  • need advices to become a welder

    Hello everyone,

    I live in Vancouver,BC. Recently I am thinking to get into the trades area to become a welder. The motivation is simple. I need to do a well paid job to feed the family. After asking around a few job training institutes, the situation is there were long waiting lists in every school in the lower mainland. The earliest will have to wait till winter 2014. So I phoned a few schools in BC inland, some still have available seats as early as Jan, 2013. But I need to leave my kids and study in a distant location for 28 weeks. It's really cost a lot-tuition fees, living cost, 28 weeks without pay cheque, and leaving home. I am 38 years old, physically I am healthy but not a strong type, and I wear glasses otherwise can not see clearly. I need everybody's opinion about this issue: Can people like me starting at my age be successful in this career? What is the biggest challenge I will face if I decided to do it?

    Thank you very much.

  • #2
    I can give you a mountain of advise in one little word.

    Alberta.

    Never mind your reasons for staying in BC. Family, friends, whatever. If you can't make a go of it those reasons just aren't good enough anymore.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not saying its late in life to job jump, I've done it numerous times. But it'll take up to 5 years to become certified as welder and the pay won't really be there until the 5 years is up..

      Now what I do when I'm really bored, is go run a tracked excavator or jump into a semi. headed for who knows where.

      Taking a course to run heavy equipment might be more up your alley. Lots of construction going on and these firms are always looking for certified operators.

      Heck. I'm not certified on a excavator, still I get $40/hr to sit there listen to the radio and spin around moving dirt. Works out to $28/hr sitting behind the wheel of a tractor trailer.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's a physical job

        Originally posted by manwithresponsibility View Post
        Hello everyone,

        I live in Vancouver,BC. Recently I am thinking to get into the trades area to become a welder. The motivation is simple. I need to do a well paid job to feed the family. After asking around a few job training institutes, the situation is there were long waiting lists in every school in the lower mainland. The earliest will have to wait till winter 2014. So I phoned a few schools in BC inland, some still have available seats as early as Jan, 2013. But I need to leave my kids and study in a distant location for 28 weeks. It's really cost a lot-tuition fees, living cost, 28 weeks without pay cheque, and leaving home. I am 38 years old, physically I am healthy but not a strong type, and I wear glasses otherwise can not see clearly. I need everybody's opinion about this issue: Can people like me starting at my age be successful in this career? What is the biggest challenge I will face if I decided to do it?

        Thank you very much.
        You will have to consider the physical demands of welding in all kinds of positions. Pipe welding is an example. Also there may be a need to travel and be away from home. You can reduce the physical part on the future by becoming a certified welding inspector.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you Matrix

          Originally posted by Matrix View Post
          I can give you a mountain of advise in one little word.

          Alberta.

          Never mind your reasons for staying in BC. Family, friends, whatever. If you can't make a go of it those reasons just aren't good enough anymore.
          I've heard a lot about Alberta that it is a place with tons of jobs. Acturally my plan is since I don't have any trades background so far, I will finish welding C level program in school then look for apprenticeship job opportunities in Alberta to upgrade to journeyman.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you Cruizer

            Originally posted by cruizer View Post
            Not saying its late in life to job jump, I've done it numerous times. But it'll take up to 5 years to become certified as welder and the pay won't really be there until the 5 years is up..

            Now what I do when I'm really bored, is go run a tracked excavator or jump into a semi. headed for who knows where.

            Taking a course to run heavy equipment might be more up your alley. Lots of construction going on and these firms are always looking for certified operators.

            Heck. I'm not certified on a excavator, still I get $40/hr to sit there listen to the radio and spin around moving dirt. Works out to $28/hr sitting behind the wheel of a tractor trailer.
            I am not that kind of person who usually can get bored with things. Actually I am a boring person most of the time. The heavy equipment operator idea really inspired me for a while because I like diving, but it seems need to spend much more money( $15000 for 6 weeks training) unless you find somebody to sponsor you. For being a welder, I just can not afford to find there are physical obstcals(like I can't lift or I can't see clearly) that could prevent me to succeed the carreer after I quit the job I am doing now. Also a lot thanks to Jbkinn too.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by manwithresponsibility View Post
              I've heard a lot about Alberta that it is a place with tons of jobs. Acturally my plan is since I don't have any trades background so far, I will finish welding C level program in school then look for apprenticeship job opportunities in Alberta to upgrade to journeyman.
              PM'ed you...

              Comment


              • #8
                I do industrial electronics now, though my former background is military in both Heavyduty, & light mechanics, Aircraft Engineer, and Avionics. I took up Driving just to do the Ice roads in 1999 & 2000. and heavy equipment operation to pass the time when I wanted to do something different for a while.

                I went into welding repair after Canadian air died.

                Depending on what you do right now, It may be best NOT to try welding as a career. Inspection maybe, but actual welding is not the best plan of action.

                Besides nothing that you take for course in B.C, will prepare you for an Alberta apprenticeship. Unless you take that course in Alberta.

                Comment


                • #9
                  that's really bad news, Cruizer

                  I mean "Besides nothing that you take for course in B.C, will prepare you for an Alberta apprenticeship. Unless you take that course in Alberta".

                  The electrician foundation programs here in the lower mainland have waiting lists till september 2013. I have no trade experience at all, so I have to start from the beginning. All I have right now is my capability of learning,and it looks like very hard to get an apprenticeship just by that.
                  Last edited by manwithresponsibility; 10-13-2012, 10:14 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So what is your job now? Just wondering why you want to job jump into something you have zero experience in, have a family to support, and being middle aged.

                    Trust me when I say that we all want to do something different. buy something, or build something nobody else has, or work at something totally left field from your present employment. Been there, done it, and the grass really isn't greener on the other side of the fence even after all the hard work to scale that fence

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      If your good, jump into the Fire

                      [career? What is the biggest challenge I will face if I decided to do it?

                      Thank you very much.[/QUOTE]

                      I am retired now, or retarded.
                      Take jobs from old customers

                      I charge 100 bucks @ hr.
                      I am mobile with with my rig.

                      Good luck,
                      Just Jim

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        a little about myself

                        Originally posted by cruizer View Post
                        So what is your job now? Just wondering why you want to job jump into something you have zero experience in, have a family to support, and being middle aged.

                        Trust me when I say that we all want to do something different. buy something, or build something nobody else has, or work at something totally left field from your present employment. Been there, done it, and the grass really isn't greener on the other side of the fence even after all the hard work to scale that fence
                        Hello Cruizer,

                        I want to tell you a little about myself.You may just take it as listening to a story.

                        I came to Canada 5 years ago as a landed immigrant. I love this country. She is beautiful and peaceful. I worked as a card dealer in a casino and then supervisor in the past 5 years. (Back to the country I came from I worked as a telecom equitpment salesman.) The pay cheque is just not big enough to meet the growning cost of raising 2 children. I make $14.10/h now plus roughly $7/h of tips.Maximum 39 hours per week without any weekend and holiday off. I know as a first generation immigrant you need to work and live hard. I have done a few high school credit courses at my spare time and I am ready to learn anything I need to. I just want to find a well paid job and hopefully I can do it for a long term maybe till I retired.

                        Thanks.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Well, Vancouver is somewhat expensive to live in. I'd say move out to one of the many smaller communitys, or even into Alberta like Medicene hat where the weather is much warmer than the rest of Alberta. And find something there in construction or oil field labourer. Make about the same but the cost of living is significantly lower. Hech you could get a cushy retirement home job there, and get paid more.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I can't tell you what to do, but It's going to be a long road to become a journeyman anything. And to apprentice, even harder due to your age.

                            Most firms pick up the younger guys, because they are not set in thier ways and can easily be trained, they don't want the older guys, because they/we are set and rather stubborn. Even if this is not you, its the way it is.

                            Let me know what you decide.

                            Jeff

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Preparing for the application of welding technician certificate program at NAIT

                              Originally posted by cruizer View Post
                              I can't tell you what to do, but It's going to be a long road to become a journeyman anything. And to apprentice, even harder due to your age.

                              Most firms pick up the younger guys, because they are not set in thier ways and can easily be trained, they don't want the older guys, because they/we are set and rather stubborn. Even if this is not you, its the way it is.

                              Let me know what you decide.

                              Jeff
                              Hi Jeff,
                              After a few days' searching and asking around(conbined with replies for this topic here), since everybody is suggesting Alberta and schools in lower mainland have ridiculous long waiting list for welding program(the earliest will be fall 2013), I am going to choose the welding technician certificate program at NAIT in Edmonton. It will start from Feb to June 2013 if being successfully registered.The expense will be $4000 include books and supplies. And plus accommodation. I wonder if you have any comment on this school and the program.How is its reputation and quality?
                              Thanks for everybody's reply. I really appreciate it. Wish me luck!
                              Harry

                              Comment

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