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  • #16
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    This wire sizing to breaker relationship in this case (short circuit) is number 12 on a 50A. Th nail is not the situation where number 6 is sized to it.
    I'm guessing the "nail" is referring to a rod becoming stuck in place when laying a bead? (dead short?)

    Your explanation is very logical and I would tend to agree with all your points. I'm planning to rewire the sub panel with 6AWG and most likely use the 8AWG for my run to the welder. This way I can run lights in the garage instead of only the welder without worrying about tripping the circuit every time I try to use the welder. Thoughts?

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    • #17
      Yes, you have the right idea there. You have to remember that most garages are not wired with the type of equipment us guys use. We end up with more and more equipment and it can be tough when you are welding full bore and say your air compressor kicks on. Sometimes it is best to bite the bullet and do it up with future upgrades in mind. However, I think 6ga feeding your sub panel with a 50a breaker and running 8ga to the welder outlet should be sufficent. Most of the time you will not have the welder cranked up to the max anyway.

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      • #18
        I'm guessing the "nail" is referring to a rod becoming stuck in place when laying a bead? (dead short?)
        The "nail" being a dead short on the primary including the internals of the machine if it doesnt have its own thermal. You got a machine with a 12 cord, could plug it in to a 10 wire circuit with 200A breaker, will not overheat the 10 building wire. In a welder circuit the breaker is not there to protect the wire from overheating.

        Your explanation is very logical and I would tend to agree with all your points. I'm planning to rewire the sub panel with 6AWG and most likely use the 8AWG for my run to the welder. This way I can run lights in the garage instead of only the welder without worrying about tripping the circuit every time I try to use the welder. Thoughts?
        This is good.
        Last edited by Sberry; 10-15-2012, 04:29 PM.

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