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211 and/or a Thunderbolt 225

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  • Frank R
    started a topic 211 and/or a Thunderbolt 225

    211 and/or a Thunderbolt 225

    First time poster and newb to welding. Just interested in hobby welding around the shop. I want to make a welding cart and some rolling stands for machinery. No cars.

    I bought a Thunderbolt 225 at an auction a couple of years ago but have not used it yet. I have recently run 220 to my garage. I also recently bought a Millermatic 211.

    Now, I have a small garage and need all the extra room I can get. My question is: will the 211 do everything that the Thunderbolt will do? Can I get rid of the Thunderbolt?

    I have heard "If its thick, use stick" but I don't know if my little Thunderbolt is big enough to make a difference.
    Last edited by Frank R; 10-09-2012, 12:00 PM.

  • Drf255
    replied
    Just a hobby guy here, but unless the job I'm doing is a really big one, I pull out the stick welder 99% of the time.

    More fun, easiers to maneuver and set up. With 25' cables, I can weld anywhere in my driveway without having to roll the machine with me, check gas flow, make a wind break, adjust wre tension....

    Leave a comment:


  • harcosparky
    replied
    I bought the Hobart Stickmate AC/DC welder for my son to practice on for school and me to take over when he is done.

    It is the Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC machine but without the overpriced blue paint.

    That blue paint adds about $100 to the price.

    Plan on adding a MM211 to the mix once I am done some research on them.

    If you have to do any welding outside in the driveway, you'll learn fast why a stick welder is a good thing to have!

    I tried living with a MIG welder only, but kept running to my neighbors to borrow his stick welder.

    I had a huge MIG welder that was overkill so I sold that and got enough money to replace it with the Hobart Stickmate and the Millermatic 211.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank R
    replied
    Originally posted by wb4rt View Post
    Now you can get that scratch start TIG rig you know you want. It will run on that AC/DC and give you a lot more things to learn and practice. It really is fun and useful.

    You people are all enablers!!!!

    I just learned about scratch-start TIG. It is pretty cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • cope
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank R View Post
    Thanks for the replies.

    This one is AC only. It is an older, horizontal unit. Not like the ones shown in the owner's manuals here.

    I was thinking the same thing Kevin. Is there anything a stick can do that a mig cannot? Like welding cast iron or some other specialty metals? I would hate to get rid of it only to find I could use it later with just some new rods.
    The olde horizontal Thunderbolt has copper windings. I started out with an Airco (made by Miller) in 1970. I did a lot of welding with that machine before I sold it and bought a used Model 88.

    Leave a comment:


  • wb4rt
    replied
    Now you can get that scratch start TIG rig you know you want. It will run on that AC/DC and give you a lot more things to learn and practice. It really is fun and useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank R
    replied
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    i like how this thread started out with you wanting to get rid of some equipment and now you have actually added more

    I can stop anytime. I have the willpower. No, really, I do...

    Leave a comment:


  • Broccoli1
    replied
    Originally posted by Frank R View Post
    Well, I found a Montgomery Ward 230/140 AC/DC welder last week and picked it up. Nice clean welder with little use for its age.

    Now to sell the AC only Thunderbolt.
    i like how this thread started out with you wanting to get rid of some equipment and now you have actually added more

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank R
    replied
    Well, I found a Montgomery Ward 230/140 AC/DC welder last week and picked it up. Nice clean welder with little use for its age.

    Now to sell the AC only Thunderbolt.

    Leave a comment:


  • weldbay
    replied
    When you run into some really dirty plate you will be glad you kept the stick welder.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sberry
    replied
    My neighnor, a journeyman with modest home/hobby stuff hasnt been down to weld something in 10 yrs but once for an alum zip since he bought a 175 mig. I might keep a buzzer I already had but the new mig isw the workhorse in small shops for general fabrication and repair. The rest of the stuff makes great dust collectors.

    Leave a comment:


  • Thrutraffic
    replied
    211 and/or a Thunderbolt 225

    Don't know why you'd want to get rid of the TBolt. I'm new to welding too and intentionally bought a 211 and the Hobart LX 235 which is a TBolt. My next machine will be a Diversion 180.

    Other than more high end expensive machines what could I need? All three of these will fit nicely on the welding cart I'm building.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevin
    replied
    yea one day at a time, you dont want to put pressure on your self, here is an interesting fact, " it takes as much time to become a quality welder as it does for a person to become a medical doctor", you wont learn it all at once so just take your time and enjoy what you are doing

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank R
    replied
    Now that I know that an AC/DC Thunderbolt can do more than an AC unit alone, I am going to keep my eye out for one.

    Here I am looking for another welder when I started out trying to convince myself to get rid of one.

    But... I really need to start practicing my welding and build a few things first.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevin
    replied
    You could not of said that any better. I think what happens when people start out, is that they just think of what is ahead of them for the short term, once they get started, they will pick up skills and knowledge, hence, keep the tbolt

    Leave a comment:

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