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question for an at home welder

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
    NEC doesn't care* about what you Plug into the wall receptacle it only Governs how the wall receptacle is wired.

    * their code for a Range Circuit/Receptacle only tells you what they want to see in that installation: they don't care if you plug something else in to it, not their problem.

    Same for an Industrial installation:
    Welder Receptacle: Code only dictates how the Receptacle and circuit is wired.
    So it sounds like what you're saying is that the cord would be fine if the inline box were eliminated from it.

    I'm assuming that the code would define "Welder Receptacle" as something other than a standard 220V/1 outlet. That's all I'm using for mine and there are many other things I can plug into it so I don't see how it could be considered a welder receptacle.

    I clearly need to look more into this within my own laws to see if I am in compliance. My friend might want to know as well.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Matrix View Post
      So it sounds like what you're saying is that the cord would be fine if the inline box were eliminated from it.

      I'm assuming that the code would define "Welder Receptacle" as something other than a standard 220V/1 outlet. That's all I'm using for mine and there are many other things I can plug into it so I don't see how it could be considered a welder receptacle.

      I clearly need to look more into this within my own laws to see if I am in compliance. My friend might want to know as well.
      It depends on where you are:
      at home, no worries and I would wouldn't worry about the cord with the in line CB

      at a job site- most likely not Ok with OSHA but that is really another ball game all together so it is not worth talking about.

      There really isn't a "welder Receptacle" it is just a receptacle and depending on which type of receptacle you install, that will dictate how the wiring is supposed to be. I was just using that as an example.

      ( a lot of 240v welding machines use a 6-50p on their power cords so a 6-50 receptacle is pretty typical)

      In a residential application and where you may have an inspector come take a looksee at your installation they will look at the rating on the receptacle and make sure that the wiring matches.


      ** there are exceptions to the rule but I doubt a Home Inspector knows about them and if they even apply in residential applications.
      Last edited by Broccoli1; 10-03-2012, 01:14 PM.

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      • #18
        If a problem ever occured with his welder the breaker would not trip until the current draw exeeded twice the normal maximum draw. Wires can fry. Internals can fry. Fires can happen.
        A machine that comes with a 50A plug is designed to be able to be connected to a 50A circuit.

        So it sounds like what you're saying is that the cord would be fine if the inline box were eliminated from it.
        This is accurate. A buzzer should really have a 10 cord which can be protected @50A, a 211 can use a 12 or better @ 50A

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        • #19
          A 14 will serve the load for a 211 but there is a catch,,, to use this on a common 50A welder circuit the machine internals would have to bump up a class (A buzzer comes with a 12 and NO thermal) but to fix this the 211 crew ads internal thermal just inside the switch, think switch in the middle, on the other side a cord of number 12 to a 50A, the breaker is not there to protect the cord or the circuit, its sc protection and on/off, the machine will only draw what it will, remember 14 will serve it,,, will never overheat the 12 feeding it.

          their code for a Range Circuit/Receptacle only tells you what they want to see in that installation: they don't care if you plug something else in to it, not their problem.
          They kin of do, its a range circuit but since the conductors are superior than the demands of the welder its pretty much a moot point. The NEC lists the demands and duty cycle, the installer iresponsiblele for ensuring the circuit is adequate, a 12 wire 50A would be legal for a 211, not for a 251, even 2 circuits with different methods, a 12/50 single circuit in pipe legal for a common buzzer, need to bump it to 10 if using romex type cable or cord. Hence the redi made 8/50 cord, covers any machine with a 50 and any extra rating required due to cord.

          Clear as mud?
          Last edited by Sberry; 10-03-2012, 06:35 PM.

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          • #20
            I have a Miller Matic 211, its awesome for the at home welder!!

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Mesluk View Post
              I don't have a 220amp plug so is there a good machine that I can get to do some basic welding? Mild steel nothing thicker than 1/4". I'm looking to keep costs down, any ideas?
              The Hobart Handler 140 will weld up to 1/4" steel. With proper preparation of the workpiece, including multi-pass, it could go over 1/4", as long you get molecular fusion. I don't see a comparable machine from Miller.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Goodhand View Post
                I don't see a comparable machine from Miller.
                http://www.millerwelds.com/products/...p?model=M00234

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                • #23
                  http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...=%7Bkeyword%7D

                  When one compares the purchase price of these two machines... $880/$500, it does not appear they are comparable in cost.

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                  • #24
                    question for an at home welder

                    Go to Harbor Freight and get a 110 volt welder and pickup some 1/16 6011 AC rods.

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