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Welding shop concrete thickness

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  • #16
    I would'nt be welding a chain to the beams, I would use flat bar that would weld to the beam and connect the chain to the flat bar with a clevis.

    I have thought about drilling the beams with a 1" nut on the bottom side for a 1" eye bolt to thread into.

    If I put holes on 3' centers I'm looking at 44 holes.

    My 2 center beams are W-12" at 53lb which have a 10" flange with and are 9/16" thick, I took these off a job and they have two 1/2" x 12" plates welded on each side to create a box so I will have to drill and tap these.

    I know in the long run I'll be glad if I do this but it means a few more days of work.

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    • #17
      I like the flat bar idea. I weld chain down to my floor beams on one side of the chain, then break them off with a hammer after I'm done.(you know beat it on the right side then beat it on the left side till it breaks off. Then I trip over the stub for a week or so before I have my helper grind them off.

      Sounds like you going to a lot of trouble to do this job right, don't skimp on the concrete, 8'' or better.

      One last thing; make sure you get a good fill around the beams, other wise you'll have a hollow sound when you bang on them.
      Good Luck,
      Bob
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      • #18
        Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
        I would use flat bar that would weld to the beam and connect the chain to the flat bar with a clevis.
        Better yet.

        Too bad Don (DDA52) is no longer participating here; anything to do with steel and concrete, or any combination of the two, I don't think there's been anybody on any boards who knew more than him. Maybe Roy could call or email him, ask Don to contribute his input??????
        Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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        • #19
          I did alot of thinking and went ahead and drilled a 1-1/16" hole in the top of the beams, I then bought 1" nuts and welded them into a 2 x 2 x 3/16" square tube that I cut 4" long ( The nuts got welded flush on one end and capped on the other side to keep concrete from getting up inside the tube.)

          I then welded a 1/2" rod x 8" long across the bottom of the tube to act as a mudd hook, I then welded them to underside of the top flange of the beam.

          so I now have 74 holes that I can spin a 1" eye bolt into. It took a while but it will be worth it.
          To keep all the dirt out of the holes I will buy allen set screws that will stay inside and I will remove as needed.

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          • #20
            Idea...

            1" threaded rod, cut 2" pieces, drill and tap left handed, use a left hand bolt to remove, cap plug to keep dirt out...
            Its a lot of extra work, and the cap plugs will may not stay in but hey, it sounds like time and effort are not a problem.

            Are you sinking in some 2.5" tube with a cross rod in the bottom to use as floor drain/tool mounts? (vertical)
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            • #21
              OK, gotta ask. Why left-hand threads?????
              Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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              • #22
                Dough Boy Racer, The nuts got welded inside the square tube and then the square tube got welded on the bottom side of the top flange. I had to do it this way because if I just were to weld the nut to the underside of the beam the concrete would block the hole.

                The concrete is going to be poured tomorrow on the onside of the beams.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
                  OK, gotta ask. Why left-hand threads?????
                  So when you tighten the bolt in the drilled and tapped hole it backs out the threaded rod plug.
                  Last edited by Doughboyracer; 09-18-2012, 12:21 PM.
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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Portable Welder View Post
                    Dough Boy Racer, The nuts got welded inside the square tube and then the square tube got welded on the bottom side of the top flange. I had to do it this way because if I just were to weld the nut to the underside of the beam the concrete would block the hole.

                    The concrete is going to be poured tomorrow on the onside of the beams.
                    I understand that...I was giving you options for your plugs for that...and options for other things to cast in the floor.
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                    • #25
                      A 40'x80' garage addition is a fair sized structure. I am sure you had a structural engineer on board for this. What is his opinion on the floor loads? If the structure was done without plans you can still hire a structural engineer to calc out the loads and thickness of the slab for under $500. There are many factors here which need to be addressed and there is no reason to "guess."

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                      • #26
                        I got all the concrete poured, The inside slab is at least 6" plus at the walls and a little thicker where the trucks pull in 8" with the heavier wire mesh.
                        I have coffee in the morning with the old guys at Mc dees and one of the old guys who owned the cement plant and now his kids run it.
                        He said they were all lauphing at the concrete plant because I made chairs to hold my wire up.
                        I also poured a 30' x 40' appron in front of the doors, That is all 8".

                        Now I have to wait for things to cure before I bring the hilo in to set the runway beams for the crane.

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