Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tig welding 1/4" aluminum 1st attempt

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Goose14
    started a topic Tig welding 1/4" aluminum 1st attempt

    Tig welding 1/4" aluminum 1st attempt

    Just bought used Lincoln precision Tig 185 with water cooler, this is my first attempt at welding 1/4" aluminum after endless hours of research on the internet mostly here and at weldingtipsandtricks.com. Im using a water cooled torch, #8 cup, 3/32 2% thoriated tungsten, gas lens, 3/32 4043 filler rod, 18 cfm argon gas. I have penetration turned all the way up, pulse off and post flow at about 20 and the amps are at max 185. I used stainless steel brush to clean joints,then sprayed with aluminum cleaner I also beveled all joints that I was able to. Its 1/4" C channel on 3/16 plate. I mig and Tig at work but only mild steel and stainless. This is my first Welder for my personal use, I really want to get good at aluminum. The inside corners are very hard to get to. I would really appreciate any suggestions
    Last edited by Goose14; 06-07-2012, 09:16 PM.

  • Goose14
    replied
    Respond

    Im gonna try rolling into and out I was getting a pin hole when finishing thanks again for the tips

    Leave a comment:


  • Jobpump53
    replied
    Tig welding 1/4" aluminum 1st attempt

    With 2% thoriated i sharpen it then lightley grind/ sand off the sharp tip to give it a slightley blunt tip. Works great.

    I roll into it very quikly if that makes sense, i try to draw a pudle within 3-4 sec and then start dippin

    Leave a comment:


  • shovelon
    replied
    Originally posted by Goose14 View Post
    Do I "mash" down on the pedal tp create an instant puddle or do I start off slowly

    Also im sharpeningy tingsten withfine grit flap disc and it doesnt seem to be balling up evenly but it does have a controled arc, whats thebest way to sharpen 2% thoriated tungsten
    You can start either way, but I roll into it. It is important to roll out when stopping to prevent cratering.

    Red tungsten will not ball up as well as 2% ceriated or 2% lanthanated.
    Personally I keep Red for DC, and ceriated and lanthanated for AC.

    For some reason 1.5% lanthanated self destructs as rapidly as Thoriated, so I been giving them out to the newbies to kill off on AC. Red is my all time favorite for steel.

    I use a belt sander to sharpen my tungstens, with a pencil like taper.
    Last edited by shovelon; 06-19-2012, 01:28 PM. Reason: decrepid

    Leave a comment:


  • Goose14
    replied
    Starting arc

    Do I "mash" down on the pedal tp create an instant puddle or do I start off slowly

    Also im sharpeningy tingsten withfine grit flap disc and it doesnt seem to be balling up evenly but it does have a controled arc, whats thebest way to sharpen 2% thoriated tungsten

    Leave a comment:


  • Goose14
    replied
    Thanks

    Got it

    Leave a comment:


  • shovelon
    replied
    [QUOTE=Goose14;287840]What is chem etching and backfeeding, also I checked out Tig handbook it says to sharpen tungsten then flaten tip? Im using fine flap disc to sharpen all I have is 41/2" grinder[/QUOTE

    Chem-etching is essentially acid or alkaline etching for removing the oxide layer. Backfeeding is tig welding the opposite direction you would normally weld, or pulling.

    Flatening a sharpened tip is counter-intuitive to me. If a flat gets on my tungsten, I sharpen it. The flat on the end of the tungsen changes the arc characteristic to a more columnar arc. I however do that with frequency.

    Leave a comment:


  • Goose14
    replied
    ?

    What is chem etching and backfeeding, also I checked out Tig handbook it says to sharpen tungsten then flaten tip? Im using fine flap disc to sharpen all I have is 41/2" grinder

    Leave a comment:


  • shovelon
    replied
    Originally posted by Drf255 View Post
    Gotta a question on this one.

    Not sure on Goose's Lincoln, but my Syncro 250 transformer topped out at 68% EN with the balance set on MAX. Wouldnt lowering it more put less heat into the part?
    It would put less heat in the metal and more in the gap.
    I see too often the balance set too much towards penetration and not get an adequate amount of cleaning. When you can clea the surface it helps with the glazing that forms the puddle.

    YMMV

    Leave a comment:


  • Drf255
    replied
    Originally posted by shovelon View Post
    Chem Etch the joints, preheat, and get yourself a bottle of Argon75%/Helium25%.

    Backfeed into the corners if you have the talent.

    Back off your balance as far as possible until your tungsten balls back too much. You are not allowing the puddle to form on the surface with your balance at full penetration. The puddle will just not glaze if you are at full pen on the balance knob.

    Good luck.
    Gotta a question on this one.

    Not sure on Goose's Lincoln, but my Syncro 250 transformer topped out at 68% EN with the balance set on MAX. Wouldnt lowering it more put less heat into the part?

    Leave a comment:


  • Goose14
    replied
    Cool

    Thanks for the tip ill check it out

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by Goose14 View Post
    Wow, I really appreciate all your responses, ill try 1/8" tungsten, but does that mean changing cup and filler size? Ill definately try clean preheat clean as well. I did notice the welds looking better after the piece got super hot from previous passes. wish I could post pics to thread but they only upload to profile photos.
    And yes im confused about what exactly etching means or how nackfilling is done
    I also take it that my settings apart from the penetration cleaning balance were ok?
    Once again thanks for the great advice
    Goose

    you might download and study the TIG Handbook... it is a wealth of basic info and a good general tig reference....it should answer the majority of your questions... and besides it is free...

    http://www.millerwelds.com/resources/TIGhandbook/

    Leave a comment:


  • Goose14
    replied
    Thanks

    Wow, I really appreciate all your responses, ill try 1/8" tungsten, but does that mean changing cup and filler size? Ill definately try clean preheat clean as well. I did notice the welds looking better after the piece got super hot from previous passes. wish I could post pics to thread but they only upload to profile photos.
    And yes im confused about what exactly etching means or how nackfilling is done
    I also take it that my settings apart from the penetration cleaning balance were ok?
    Once again thanks for the great advice

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    Originally posted by reggie View Post
    Confuse the newb some more.Etching, buying helium mix... come on the guy's machine is underweight for doing it anyways.He don't have enough amps welding on a heatsink.
    That's nice.... but not very constructive.... if the OP was looking to buy a larger machine ... am pretty sure he would have asked for purchase advice...
    the idea is to help him accomplish the task with the welder he has... ... it can be done and is every day.... sure the welder is marginal... but with the advice from Shovelon...and the others.. he can do a decent job of it.... just part of the learning curve toward the skillset to get the job done with the equipment at hand....
    Last edited by H80N; 06-08-2012, 08:01 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • reggie
    replied
    Originally posted by shovelon View Post
    Chem Etch the joints, preheat, and get yourself a bottle of Argon75%/Helium25%.

    Backfeed into the corners if you have the talent.

    Back off your balance as far as possible until your tungsten balls back too much. You are not allowing the puddle to form on the surface with your balance at full penetration. The puddle will just not glaze if you are at full pen on the balance knob.

    Good luck.
    Confuse the newb some more.Etching, buying helium mix... come on the guy's machine is underweight for doing it anyways.He don't have enough amps welding on a heatsink.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X