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TIG Tungsten Grinding

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  • TIG Tungsten Grinding

    I have been using a 6" table grinder for my tungsten. Basically, this was how i learned to TIG weld. However, this week i have seen a major difference in my welds when I used a new wheel. So, I am wondering how much money I should invest into a better grinding system? I do not have a ton of money laying around to blow on this. Buy, if there is a HUGE quality improvement then I will need to weigh the pro's on cons.

    I am mainly welding 7005 Aluminum Tubing with a Diversion 165. I do not weld a lot of hours in a month. Maybe 15 to 20 hours at best.

    What is the best value for tungsten grinding?

    Your advise is grearly appreciated

  • #2
    You can either buy a tungsten grinder which is most likely best but more money or a cheap bench grinder with a new wheel that you don't use for anything else.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MMW View Post
      You can either buy a tungsten grinder which is most likely best but more money or a cheap bench grinder with a new wheel that you don't use for anything else.
      ^^^ This is what I have now. Is there a best grit or wheel? Bench with a diamond wheel etc....?

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      • #4
        http://www.diamondground.com/piranha2tungstengrinders.html

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ggodwin View Post
          ^^^ This is what I have now. Is there a best grit or wheel? Bench with a diamond wheel etc....?
          Diamond wheels are nice, some shops using grinding wheels will use two grits, a course and fine grit. If you just need to lightly dress the tungsten use the fine grit only.

          Or use a medium to course grit to remove any contamination that might be on the tungsten, or to shape a point on a new tungsten, then use the diamond to put on a nice finish

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          • #6
            TIG Tungsten Grinding

            It does depend on how your grinding it, a stone with a fine grit would be better, but try to avoid grinding it with the side of the tungsten towards the stone as the grind marks will cause the arc to be more unstable and sort of spiral off the tungsten where as if it's straight likes with the tungsten front on to the wheel it will have a more stable and controllable cone

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            • #7
              Here's what I use, lapidary diamond disks. You need a backing plate, but then you just stick these diamond disks on it. I mounted mine on a motor I already had, but you can use a grinder.
              http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-6-Diamon...item5d2fa98641

              JD

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              • #8
                if your using a gringing stone,it should be a fine stone. do not use it for regulr steel or anything else. change stones if you must?
                i notice that you say your welding aluminum. this is done with high frequency a.c.. the tungsten must form a ball .this is because using a.c. the current changes fron d.c.r.p to d.c.s.p. so do not use dc only. ac only without h.f. if your using steel brush to clean the welds, stop using it. use stainless only. this is because stainless will not fall into the weld and mateial as easy as steel. steel is carbon base aluminum is not. the two a diffenent metals,and have to be treated as such.
                the rest is up to you. amps,speed ,arc length.
                one last thing ,when welding aluminum use 100% pure tungsten,also 100% argon gas.. yes all that cost more . if you don't follow the right set up.it will cost a lot in repairs.do it righ,t cost a lot less.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ilm48 View Post
                  if your using a gringing stone,it should be a fine stone. do not use it for regulr steel or anything else. change stones if you must?
                  i notice that you say your welding aluminum. this is done with high frequency a.c.. the tungsten must form a ball .this is because using a.c. the current changes fron d.c.r.p to d.c.s.p. so do not use dc only. ac only without h.f. if your using steel brush to clean the welds, stop using it. use stainless only. this is because stainless will not fall into the weld and mateial as easy as steel. steel is carbon base aluminum is not. the two a diffenent metals,and have to be treated as such.
                  the rest is up to you. amps,speed ,arc length.
                  one last thing ,when welding aluminum use 100% pure tungsten,also 100% argon gas.. yes all that cost more . if you don't follow the right set up.it will cost a lot in repairs.do it righ,t cost a lot less.
                  If you are using your Diversion 165.. DO NOT use pure tungsten AND.... DO NOT ball it!!!!! disregard that advice.... it is wrong....!!!!

                  A 2% ceriated tungsten is recommended ground to a taper 2-1/2 Times
                  Electrode Diameter lengthwise...

                  Inverter TIG machines require different tung selection and prep...

                  refer to figs 9-1 & 9-2 in the owners manual on tungsten...

                  http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o232895g_mil.pdf

                  Also refer to resources referenced in your previous threads...

                  http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...-your-tungsten

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chewinggum View Post
                    Here's what I use, lapidary diamond disks. You need a backing plate, but then you just stick these diamond disks on it. I mounted mine on a motor I already had, but you can use a grinder.
                    http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-6-Diamon...item5d2fa98641

                    JD
                    How long do these last? I would like to use use a course and a fine on a bench grinder I will make a couple backers for them. Can you grind hard on them when you have a lot of trash on a tungsten? Thanks in advace for any info

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am using these http://www.widgetsupply.com/product/SGQ8-38540.html diamond wheels in a Dremel tool. I have tried 80 grit (too coarse), 100 (good for roughing a new tungsten or cleaning contamination) and 300 or 400 for final polish and touchup. They work great and the price is right. I will try and post a picture of my high dollar (about $20) sharpening machine later today.

                      And, for what it is worth, I us a purple Scotchbrite stripper disc in my drill press to put a final polish on the tungsten. It also removes any tarnish from previous use.

                      Ken

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                      • #12
                        Another excellent solution is to put the tungsten in a cordless drilland sharpen it on a benchtop vertical belt sander. Very consistent. Always sharpen the tungsten in the direction of travel, not perpendicular. Dave

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                        • #13
                          Here, I hope, is a picture of my home made sharpener...



                          Well, the site refuses to show it. But anyhow the Dremel is a battery powered unit. It uses rechargeable AAs. The disks in the tool are 100 and 300 grit separated by a piece of cork gasket material. This prevents the two from rubbing together and damaging the diamond coating on the back side. The spare disks are 80 and 400 grit. The chuck, originally from a cordless drill I think, makes it easy to hold and rotate short or small diameter electrodes. I have done a considerable amount of sharpening and the disks seem to be holding up fine.

                          If I had to choose 2 I would go with the 100 and 400 grit disks.

                          Ken
                          Attached Files
                          Last edited by taylorkh; 02-04-2013, 06:22 AM. Reason: I have learned how to make an image show :-)

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                          • #14
                            Here you go.

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                            • #15
                              When I was looking for a grinder, several people recommended this one.

                              http://www.harborfreight.com/3-inch-...her-94071.html

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