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6011 Vertical up T joint

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  • 6011 Vertical up T joint

    I'm running about 78-80 amps on AC with 3/16" flat bar. I'm having problems with pretty much the whole thing. We run on 7" pieces, and the first 2 inches of my root pass is great. Then it starts to look a little inconsistent and eventually turns into either incomplete fusion or I get this pit down the center of the bead. On my cover pass, It either looks just terrible, or it will look good but the undercut is cut in probably half way through the thickness of the metal. I use a whip and pause for my root pass, and I either do a Z weave or and "up and over" motion. This is the only weld I have done that I have had trouble with. Any help is appreciated.

  • #2
    ac and dc up

    why ac, that's regular steele , correct. either that or your movin to fast.that is for that amperage.

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    • #3
      forgot to ask, are you doin the whole joint 6011, are you covering w/ 7018?

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      • #4
        6011 Vertical up T joint

        Don't see the point in doing both passes in 6011, but I would do a up and down whip mouton for root ( assuming its an open root ) and a u type whip for cap and lower the amps
        Kevin

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        • #5
          6011 Vertical up T joint

          Sorry missed the T joint part, just do j or u motion on both passes, just hold the sides and fast through the middle
          Kevin

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          • #6
            6011 Vertical up T joint

            Keep a tighter arc and burn the 7018 into the sides longer and watch for it to wash outside the rod before u move on. Also maybe try to slow down on the 6011 and see where that gets you.

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            • #7
              Yeah I forgot to put this in. We are covering with 6011 because I'm in a class and it's part of the cirriculum. I use AC because my booth is the worst for arc blow in the shop. When I was on DC the root was untouched by filler metal after my first pass.

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              • #8
                Moving your ground around on the base metal and lowering your amperage a little bit helps get rid of that arc blow in DC. Also, a lot of guys will crank the arc control on their machine all the way up for better penetration, and it seems to me that it causes more problems than it fixes. I feel ya on all that, I'm finished with stick, FINALLY, and it was a little trying at times. Unfortunately, all the guys in the shop still call me Mr. Undercut... oh btw, is that a 3/32 or 1/8 6010?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bobcatnoob View Post
                  Moving your ground around on the base metal and lowering your amperage a little bit helps get rid of that arc blow in DC. Also, a lot of guys will crank the arc control on their machine all the way up for better penetration, and it seems to me that it causes more problems than it fixes. I feel ya on all that, I'm finished with stick, FINALLY, and it was a little trying at times. Unfortunately, all the guys in the shop still call me Mr. Undercut... oh btw, is that a 3/32 or 1/8 6010?
                  It sounds like I'm having the exact same problems. I've been working on it for like a month straight now so I finally just gave up and got a grade. I have no idea what I got yet but it isn't gonna be good. I'll probably just go back to it later, but right now I'm gonna focus on my overhead.

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                  • #10
                    It takes a while for it to become indistinct, personally I rarely run anything other than a basic whip and pause, once its mastered there are so many things a guy can do with it. Fill cracks, gaps, weld light sheet and you can do it hot, without trying to turn the machine too low just to get some control,,, which one rarely gets anyway with that method.

                    Here are a couple pics, they are not meant to be poster cases but to demonstrate technique, the first one is similar to the joint in question. Setting hot, 3/16 or so plate, look how the operator just burn into the base, almost thru but manage to stack it all together in orderly fashion and not let it run. These are highly magnified so every flaw shows up. I think next might be simple bead, see the difference whispacinggh and speed make, another a gap similar to what a guy mighencounterer in the web of a beam, next maybe 2 beads, one the first rod as practice and already some improvement in the second bead.
                    I don't do this every day, in fact its rare for me to weld more than a stick or 2 at a time, usually on some rusted pitted deal, but a few minutes a day for a week or so I could start to come to speed, some of the pipe guys really get good aconsistentant.

                    Its not all practice,,, its learning how, I never forget but I lose some polish from not doing it,, we run wire in shop mostly and I try once in a while to run a stick. I am probably a B+ welder if I put my mind to it but would have to work at it a bit to come up to an A game. If I had to pick up my lunch box again I would need to sharpen up but my work only requires a certain level of quality most of the time, there ibenefitnifit for me to become some great golden arm but this is a skill EVERY mechanic or guy that works with his hands should possess IMO, a guy with some real basic welding skillaccomplishplish so much thats just impossible for those that don't have it.
                    Attached Files
                    Last edited by Sberry; 04-22-2012, 03:33 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I was doing a demo and ran across a guy that was a poster child for this, about 50, 25 yrs in the maint field and was displaced by a 23 yr old who had strong welding skills. What was a shame was after a rod of instruction, couple rods of practice it was apparent the guy had the ability to be a natural. He said,,, my bro in-law is a pipe liner, showed him a couple things but he never really try it.

                      lookedkt his guy square in the eye and said, your bro has done you a big dis service at the least over the years in not sharing some basic welding skill and instruction, go home, grab him by the short hairs and get on this a bit. This is a guy that has missed hugopportunitieses in his career for not taking a little time out to becomproficientnt with a welding machine, it adds about 20 IQ points in ability to the average mechanic at minimum.

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                      • #12
                        Hard to tell if there is a point to this and what it might be. Sberry is trying to convey a message but I cannot get it.


                        Byron

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                        • #13
                          You are right, just babble. Probably in some twisted way there is a point.

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                          • #14
                            I think I actually got the point......You can "practice" your whole life and it does no good if you practice doing it wrong, and don't miss an opportunity to learn the correct way or teach somebody else something.
                            Was I close?

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                            • #15
                              sorry if this has been answered all ready, no time to read all post, your problem is with the rod, using 3/32 6011 sucks, the first half of the rod is ok, the 2nd half is junk, this only applies to using it with high amperage, 80 amps is up there , 3/32 is fine at about 50 amps if ya want the whole rod to be used try 6011 1/8 at about 100 amps, depending on the machine that you are using

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