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TIG welding Cast Iron

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  • #16
    Originally posted by aametalmaster View Post
    Sounds like he needs a globe valve installed before the burners to regulate the flow of gas...Bob
    I guess I should have included a little more information when I started this thread. The burner is on a "Commercial" style range. It has six of these burners each having a maximum Btu output of 23K Btu. Being on a range it has a very high quality adjustment valve for each burner that has a large range, is linear and smooth. The issue is it won't go low enough.

    I have it adjusted where the outer ring has very few "Ports" burning on low and it is still too hot for a low simmer. On low there is a separate "Low End" adjustment you make to the valve (Like an idle mixture screw on a carb). I can adjust it so low that flames will go out. Bottom line is the burner cap has too many ports for very low temperature simmering. What I am trying to do is take one of the burners and make it into a low temperature "Simmer Burner".

    One of the folks on a forum I frequent has blocked the two outer rings using Permatex Muffler and Tailpipe Putty. It works but looks like crap!

    Comment


    • #17
      Not being a smart as$ but did you take gas pressure readings ? Could it be a regulator adjustment upstream of the equipment ? just thinking. We had a gas service where the local Gas supplier upgrade the meter and pressure and the inside regulators were now on the high side {still within limits** so we had to drop down pressure to match equipment specs. Just curious.

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      • #18
        Not a bad question. But no I have not measured the pressure as it exits the meter/regulator. However the range has it's own internal regulator and it appears to working normally.

        The real issue is the basic design of the burner. The manufacturer (Capital) has tried to make one burner do it all - from ultra low simmer to mega heat. This range has the hottest burner (23K Btu) of any residential range. All of the other upper end ranges use a dedicated simmer burner. This issue has been brought up to the manufacturer and I am told they are working on a "Solution".

        However, since being a hot rodder and welder since the 60s I figure I can do it myself, better. Additionally, doing stuff like this is fun.

        I do appreciate the recommendations and suggestions.

        Comment


        • #19
          Shark,

          You say that the "ports" are .10" in dia. That makes them too large for a ight fit for 3/32" SS filler.

          If it was mine, I would drill out the holes to 7/64 (1/64 shy of 1/8") and measure the distance from the top of the burner hole to where an inserted rod would seat. I'd then cut lengths of 1/8" 304 SS filler to that length. Insert the filler (tight fit) and then just hit the tops of the filler with the tig arc. The filler is going to melt before the cast iron becomes fluid and seal the hole.

          PS. You may have to drill the holes a full 1/8" depending on how the cast drills, but you do want a tight fit.
          Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200 DX
          Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
          Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
          Hobart HH187
          Dialarc 250 AC/DC
          Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
          Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
          PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
          Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
          Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
          More grinders than hands

          Comment


          • #20
            SundownIII:

            Thanks for the ideas. If I take this approach with the short pieces of 304 what 200 DX settings would you start with?

            Comment


            • #21
              Shark,

              I'd probably set the machine for 120A and go from there.

              You're not going to need a whole lot of amps to melt the SS filler.

              Was just thinking that this would be the "cleanest" way to skin that cat since you mentioned that appearance was important.
              Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
              Dynasty 200 DX
              Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
              Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
              Hobart HH187
              Dialarc 250 AC/DC
              Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
              Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
              PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
              Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
              Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
              More grinders than hands

              Comment


              • #22
                How about using Sundown's idea, but plug the holes with 1/8 od TUBING to reduce all the hole sizes.
                CG
                Old Miller Swinger 180 Buzzbox
                Miller Diversion 165
                1945 Craftsman Atlas Lathe
                Smithy Lathe/Mill

                Comment


                • #23
                  You said But Plug....uh huh....huh......here's an idea....your burner won't go low enough. Why not leave the holes and just get some sort of reducer/restrictor?
                  Originally posted by chewinggum View Post
                  How about using Sundown's idea, but plug the holes with 1/8 od TUBING to reduce all the hole sizes.
                  CG

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    turbo,

                    That was my first thought, but then the OP indicated the problem with that was when the flow rate was turned all the way down, there was not enough gas flowing thru the ports to keep the flame lit.

                    Think he's on the right track. Reducing the size of the gas orifice to reduce the overall flow of gas while reducing the number of ports so that he gets sufficient gas flow thru the remaining ports to keep the flame lit.
                    Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                    Dynasty 200 DX
                    Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                    Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                    Hobart HH187
                    Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                    Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                    Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                    PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                    Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                    Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                    More grinders than hands

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      If the guy that used the muffler goop has it working ok, why not machine a nice looking cup washer to mate the upper surface of the burner and cover up the goop. fill the cup and stick it onto the burner. You'll know it's there but you won't have to see it. Couple of other issues do come to mind though- will the air orifice at the nozzle supply enough air to keep the flame clean so it doesn't soot up your pots and clog what's left of your burner or do you need to modify the venturi as well?
                      Your warranty will probably be out the window.
                      Your insurance company will love you if it burns down your house and they don't have to pay so be cautious.
                      Can you substitute the burner with a smaller one from some other gas appliance?Just a thought.
                      Thin cast iron can chill when cast as in the edges of the burner holes, making them both hard and brittle. This increases the chances that it could be hard to tap and could crack when you weld on it. This might not be the case but it can be.
                      Is your burner enamelled. I couldn't tell from the picture. This may also increase the difficulty of both welding and/or tapping.
                      Fun project though. Good luck.
                      Meltedmetal

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Update

                        I really appreciate all of the comments and recommendations.

                        Melted: Because of the shape of the burner it would be difficult to machine a 'Cap" to cover the outer two rings. No problem with the air shutter being adjustable enough to get a proper flame even when the orifice size is greatly reduced. Good comments about being careful. There are no similar, smaller burners that can be substituted for the original. The burner cap is very thick, raw cast iron - no enamel so it should not be a problem either tapping the holes for plugs or welding.

                        I had a long talk with the engineer who worked on the development of these ranges yesterday and he is in the process of solving the "Simmer Issue". He has made and tested a burner cap that only has the inner ring of "Ports". He did say that while it works, and he confirmed the size of orifice I was going to use for just the inner ring, he thinks he will have an even better solution in the very near future. These ranges are made here in the USA so I am not having to deal with a company half way around the world.

                        With a manufacturer's solution on the way I am going to wait an see what they come up with before I weld/tap my burner, and yes it is an interesting project.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I just finished reading this thread from the beginning .... I want to mention, thanks for the update, many times we never really find out what the answer/solution to the problem is.

                          Before I saw your final post, first thing that came to my mind was small sheet-metal screws. Get a size that just barely bites in, they may leak a little, but so what? You could always remove them later if you wanted the full burner back.
                          Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Shark Bait said"With a manufacturer's solution on the way I am going to wait an see what they come up with before I weld/tap my burner, and yes it is an interesting project. "

                            I agree with the choice. I was in the general repair business some years ago and I always figured that if you could buy it, it would probably save you money just to do that rather than custom build one unless it needed re-engineering or the hay was down and it was looking like rain. Hi hi(=ha ha it's a ham radio thing). Anyway since the manufacturer has recognized the need and is doing something about it I would also wait to see what they come up with.
                            When you get it working we'll all be over for some stew....I'll bring some beer and a salad.
                            Hope it works out for you.
                            Meltedmetal

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