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Miller Sycrowave 200 Or Lincoln 225 Precision Tig vs. Thermal ARC 185 ???

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  • Miller Sycrowave 200 Or Lincoln 225 Precision Tig vs. Thermal ARC 185 ???

    I am pretty much a home hobbyest with a little sidework always coming in. I currently have a Miller EconoTIG and want to upgrade. As always budget allows only so much. I want to purchase a new machine. I am weldinding carbon, stainless and aluminum mostly 3/16" ( occasionally 1/4") and smaller. I am undecided between the Miller Sycrowave 200 Or Lincoln 225 Precision Tig vor the Thermal ARC 185.


    Any help will be appreciated!

  • #2
    you are talking apples to oranges..... 2 transformer machines to 1 inverter....

    out of the bunch I would chose the TA-185....

    but then again I have a Dynasty 200DX and Dynasty 350 Tigrunner.......

    The inverter wins.... it was an unfair comparison....

    would guess that the transformer machines will disapear from the new market within 5 years.... although the trade in used ones should remain brisk.....
    .

    *******************************************
    The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

    “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

    Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

    My Blue Stuff:
    Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
    Dynasty 200DX
    Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
    Millermatic 200

    TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by H80N View Post
      you are talking apples to oranges..... 2 transformer machines to 1 inverter....

      out of the bunch I would chose the TA-185....

      but then again I have a Dynasty 200DX and Dynasty 350 Tigrunner.......

      The inverter wins.... it was an unfair comparison....

      would guess that the transformer machines will disapear from the new market within 5 years.... although the trade in used ones should remain brisk.....
      Oh, give them old transformer machines a break, will ya? At least they will have good recycle value from the copper in them.
      Nothing welded, Nothing gained

      Miller Dynasty700DX
      3 ea. Miller Dynasty350DX
      Miller Dynasty200DX
      ThermalArc 400 GTSW
      MillerMatic350P
      MillerMatic200 with spoolgun
      MKCobraMig260
      Lincoln SP-170T
      Linde UCC305 (sold 2011)
      Hypertherm 1250
      Hypertherm 800
      PlasmaCam CNC cutter
      Fadal Toolroom CNC Mill
      SiberHegner CNC Mill
      2 ea. Bridgeport
      LeBlond 15" Lathe
      Haberle 18" Cold Saw
      Doringer 14" Cold Saw
      6 foot x 12 foot Mojave granite

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by shovelon View Post
        Oh, give them old transformer machines a break, will ya? At least they will have good recycle value from the copper in them.
        Did say that they would be on the used market.... Didn't I???

        Present administration is working hard so that "Electricity Prices Will Neccesarily Skyrocket" (Obama quote)....... upshot: If you have a transformer machine, you might be able to afford turning it on for 10 minutes on alternate sundays.....
        .

        *******************************************
        The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

        “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

        Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

        My Blue Stuff:
        Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
        Dynasty 200DX
        Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
        Millermatic 200

        TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

        Comment


        • #5
          1/4" aluminum you are going to need more than 185 amps to do any sizable piece. Tha t would narrow it down to the 200 or 225, then just shop price. Personally I wouldn't buy under 250 amps. The extra money spent up front gives you sooooo much more capacity, as well as features available.

          Comment


          • #6
            I know you said new but my vote would be for a used transformer machine. They are built solidly & last a long time. This would give you the best value for money spent. The 175 to 225 amp machines were bought by a lot of home/hobby users & not used very hard. Really nice ones can be had in my area for $1000 to $1400 range. Not knocking inverters but in a home use application I don't think you would notice the difference.

            Don't be misled by the 225 amp ones vs. the 175/185 amp ones. You do get more top end but at a very limited duty cycle.
            Last edited by MMW; 12-26-2011, 10:25 AM.
            MM250
            Trailblazer 250g
            22a feeder
            Lincoln ac/dc 225
            Victor O/A
            MM200 black face
            Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
            Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
            Arco roto-phase model M
            Vectrax 7x12 band saw
            Miller spectrum 875
            30a spoolgun w/wc-24
            Syncrowave 250
            RCCS-14

            Comment


            • #7
              If we are going to widen this to used machines... you can buy an excellent fully equipped 250 amp transformer TIG machine... for less than any of those you have listed... check CL or ebay for them within driving distance of you.... you might be pleasantly surprised... like a Sync 250 or Idealarc TIG... or even a Tigwave 250.... they are all 300 amp at limited duty cycle...
              .

              *******************************************
              The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

              “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

              Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

              My Blue Stuff:
              Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
              Dynasty 200DX
              Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
              Millermatic 200

              TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by H80N View Post
                If we are going to widen this to used machines... you can buy an excellent fully equipped 250 amp transformer TIG machine... for less than any of those you have listed... check CL or ebay for them within driving distance of you.... you might be pleasantly surprised... like a Sync 250 or Idealarc TIG... or even a Tigwave 250.... they are all 300 amp at limited duty cycle...
                Thought about mentioning that but most homes don't have 100 amps in the garage.
                MM250
                Trailblazer 250g
                22a feeder
                Lincoln ac/dc 225
                Victor O/A
                MM200 black face
                Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
                Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
                Arco roto-phase model M
                Vectrax 7x12 band saw
                Miller spectrum 875
                30a spoolgun w/wc-24
                Syncrowave 250
                RCCS-14

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MMW View Post
                  Thought about mentioning that but most homes don't have 100 amps in the garage.
                  Good reason to go with the TA 185. As far as welding 1/4", a good preheat and mixed gas should do the trick. That way you can operated off a 30 amp breaker in the garage.

                  I have been welding 1/4" easily off 230volts, and straight argon with my Dynasty200, and 3/16" off 115volts with straight argon.
                  Nothing welded, Nothing gained

                  Miller Dynasty700DX
                  3 ea. Miller Dynasty350DX
                  Miller Dynasty200DX
                  ThermalArc 400 GTSW
                  MillerMatic350P
                  MillerMatic200 with spoolgun
                  MKCobraMig260
                  Lincoln SP-170T
                  Linde UCC305 (sold 2011)
                  Hypertherm 1250
                  Hypertherm 800
                  PlasmaCam CNC cutter
                  Fadal Toolroom CNC Mill
                  SiberHegner CNC Mill
                  2 ea. Bridgeport
                  LeBlond 15" Lathe
                  Haberle 18" Cold Saw
                  Doringer 14" Cold Saw
                  6 foot x 12 foot Mojave granite

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The 3 machines listed by the OP all are about $2300-$2500, ebay pricing. I would find it hard to justify that for a home/hobby/part time use when you can get a good used one that will do the same thing for $1000 less.
                    MM250
                    Trailblazer 250g
                    22a feeder
                    Lincoln ac/dc 225
                    Victor O/A
                    MM200 black face
                    Whitney 30 ton hydraulic punch
                    Lown 1/8x 36" power roller
                    Arco roto-phase model M
                    Vectrax 7x12 band saw
                    Miller spectrum 875
                    30a spoolgun w/wc-24
                    Syncrowave 250
                    RCCS-14

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Just my opinion (and you know what they say about opinions). I was in the same situation a few months ago, trying to decide between a new Syncrowave 200 and a RED 225. I do small welding/fab on the side to help pay for school, a large job came in that required multiple, LONG welds on 1/8 to 1/4" aluminum. My only draw to the 225 was the few extra amps, but as it has been mentioned, the extremely limited duty cycle at those extra amps almost negates the benefits. About the same week I was ready to pull the trigger on a new Syncro 200 package, I found a screaming good deal on Craigslist for a 1991 Syncrowave 250 complete setup minus bottle in great condition.

                      I am really glad I waited/the 250 fell in my lap as it is REALLY nice to have the ability to turn the dial past the 200 mark. Remember the old saying of "you can't use amps that you didn't buy" unfortunately amps to a welder are not like minutes to a prepaid phone, you can't just add more.

                      Another thing to consider is that there may be extra costs associated with a new machine such as filler, torch consumables, argon bottle. I would assume that you already have those from your econotig. One other thing I would like to mention is that if you feel 3/16" and 1/4" are in you common diet shall we say. You will probably want to look into a water cooled torch to replace the air cooled (WP17 I believe) that comes with the Syncrowave 200 and the RED 225.

                      Don't let people scare you off the amp input requirements of the Syncrowave 250. I run mine up to 275 amps in A/C tig on a 50 amp breaker and have so far never tripped it. I did once trip it when turning the machine up to 310 amps just to see what a 310 amp tig arc felt like (ha ha ha). The key to being able to run on this lower breaker is due to the fact that my machine does NOT have the power factor correction caps in it. So when shopping for a used 250, you may want to keep that in mind.

                      One last thing is that I feel you may need to make a decision as to how you want to proceed with your side business. That is do you want to venture into portable work (choose the TA185) or do you want to get into larger, thicker items that are brought to you (Syncro 250)? Although the Syncro 250 may cost more than the 200 new, the extra 100 amps that you gain could really help you to expand your small business, I know it did for me. Not many "on the side" guys have a 300amp ac/dc tig at their disposal.

                      Just a few things to consider.
                      Last edited by zachary kling; 12-26-2011, 01:19 PM.

                      Comment

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