Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

The forum is currently undergoing maintenance and is in a 'read-only' mode for the time being. Sorry for the inconvenience.


  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

starting a buisness

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • starting a buisness

    I am 16 years old and i am looking to start my own buisness of some sort. something like small repair and things like that. i recently bought a thermal arc 181i its sweet and i run it off a bobcat 250 welder/generator. i am certified stick 7018 vertical and mig .035 vertical and soon going for flux and all tig i hope to get it all one day, but i really want to start now i have all my own tools and equipment and in the process of building a trailer. but where do i start? i have no idea how to get my name out there and i dont even know if i have all the licensing for any of this if you need any and what to do or where to go. need some advice. and also if i should get into a partnership or work solo what would be better.

  • #2
    Good Luck- I'm not sure you can start a business on your own iffin' yer under 18-

    Not trying to discourage you- but something to check out.

    You'll need:
    Business License
    Insurance- which I imagine for a 16 yr old will be **** near impossible-



    at 16, might want to try and get in with a shop to see how a business runs and
    plan an exit strategy, say 2 years saving up start up cash for when you want to
    step out on your own 100%

    Unfortunately, starting a business is not cheap.

    Comment


    • #3
      Take some business classes. The world is full of good techs who can't make a profit because they lack background.

      Comment


      • #4
        Work for someone else for awhile & learn everything you can about the work & the business end. Start writing a business plan now & adjust/change it as you learn more. Don't burn any bridges on the way out.

        Comment


        • #5
          okay thankyou all i think i will just keep working welding buckets for now. i am just trying to get an idea on what it would be like and what i would need to start out a repair/fab buisness

          Comment


          • #6
            Where do you live? In the USA it's illegal to have anyone under 18 working with power tools in a commercial environment.
            I can't imagine owning a business without several years real world experience in the particular field. That would be a death blow from the get go in my opinion.

            JT

            Comment


            • #7
              Can Do Attitude...

              Originally posted by mauerick View Post
              okay thankyou all i think i will just keep working welding buckets for now. i am just trying to get an idea on what it would be like and what i would need to start out a repair/fab buisness
              Do not be Discouraged..!!

              I would think that if you started gradually and carefully you could do it fairly low key.. just make sure you have the competence to do the jobs you take in....

              I have a real problem with the regulatory mess that we have put ourselves in where you need a license, health certificate, and an environmental impact statement to open a lemonade stand... What ever happened to initiative and free enterprise???
              We hear why we can't do things... no wonder this country is sliding downhill... that is a garbage attitude... this country was not built on negativity and over regulation... It was built on skill, ambition and sweat....

              I applaud your goals... as far as a minor with power tools goes what in the Blue Blazes do they call the kid with a lawnmower that earns money by mowing lawns???
              Think we need to start doing things again rather than coming up with excuses for why we can't.... or we truly will be the slaves of the regulators and naysayers... Remember.. our government works for us not the other way around!!!!

              Keep your eye on the prize... I congratulate you for having a clear idea of what you want to do and the focus to earn and buy the tools to go there... you will go far..... The winners in life are the ones that figure out how to get stuff done...
              not the ones that make excuses for why it can't!!!!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                Where do you live? In the USA it's illegal to have anyone under 18 working with power tools in a commercial environment.
                I can't imagine owning a business without several years real world experience in the particular field. That would be a death blow from the get go in my opinion.

                JT
                well ive been going to school for the past 3 years for metal fabrication and joining technologys im at junior in highschool now and ive used all kinds of power tools and operate heavy equipment even tho i dont got any licensing for it yet

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by H80N View Post
                  Do not be Discouraged..!!

                  I would think that if you started gradually and carefully you could do it fairly low key.. just make sure you have the competence to do the jobs you take in....

                  I have a real problem with the regulatory mess that we have put ourselves in where you need a license, health certificate, and an environmental impact statement to open a lemonade stand... What ever happened to initiative and free enterprise???
                  We hear why we can't do things... no wonder this country is sliding downhill... that is a garbage attitude... this country was not built on negativity and over regulation... It was built on skill, ambition and sweat....

                  I applaud your goals... as far as a minor with power tools goes what in the Blue Blazes do they call the kid with a lawnmower that earns money by mowing lawns???
                  Think we need to start doing things again rather than coming up with excuses for why we can't.... or we truly will be the slaves of the regulators and naysayers... Remember.. our government works for us not the other way around!!!!

                  Keep your eye on the prize... I congratulate you for having a clear idea of what you want to do and the focus to earn and buy the tools to go there... you will go far..... The winners in life are the ones that figure out how to get stuff done...
                  not the ones that make excuses for why it can't!!!!!!
                  wow thankyou, i wont give up on it, i know i still got alot to learn but all in time ill reach my goals one day to build up and own a buisness. i am going to try to do work under the table where people can brings there things to me and i will fix them up without having to get all these stupied licenses and all health stuff that goes with it hopefully. i have a good idea on how to be safe and what to do and what not to do now i even got my ocea 10 card and ive been doing this for about 3 years now and i still have all my fingers on me haha. but i totally agree with you and thankyou much for the advice sir

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mauerick View Post
                    well ive been going to school for the past 3 years for metal fabrication and joining technologys im at junior in highschool now and ive used all kinds of power tools and operate heavy equipment even tho i dont got any licensing for it yet

                    That's not a commercial environment. You aren't an employee of the school.
                    I don't make up the rules, the federal dept of labor does.
                    As far as the lawn mower goes, I don't have a landscaping business so I don't have any idea but I do know that I can't have a minor work with power tools, in an excavation plus a lot of other restrictions. Anybody can look em up at the dept of labor site.

                    JT

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JTMcC View Post
                      That's not a commercial environment. You aren't an employee of the school.
                      I don't make up the rules, the federal dept of labor does.
                      As far as the lawn mower goes, I don't have a landscaping business so I don't have any idea but I do know that I can't have a minor work with power tools, in an excavation plus a lot of other restrictions. Anybody can look em up at the dept of labor site.

                      JT
                      See young people all the time operating heavy machinery and equipment on farms.. some much younger than 16..... Maybe this could be interpteted as an "Agricultural" environment........ have seen 14 year olds operating half million dollar combines with as much competency as adults..... and a combine is certainly heavy equipment....

                      It might just be that in a rural "Agricultural" setting, that there would be an interpretation of this situation that is quite permissable.... Different rules for industry and the family agricultural endeavor.... would probably have to be sanctioned an run by the parents as an official matter.......... but quite likely there are a set of circumstances that will allow this....

                      there are places where "Dept of Labor" and "Dept of Agriculture" rules and regulations are in direct opposition..........

                      depending on the state of residence.. a juvenile "Work Permit" could be gotten...
                      with one of those... working restricted hours and under adult supervision many of thel child labor laws are waived.... using some "Common Sense"..............

                      We are getting ourselves so over regulated that pretty soon we will face jail time and fines for "Passing Gas" without a permit and supervision....
                      If we do not fix that pretty soon, we might as well lay down ans join all of the socialists in the European Union..... they have about 5 regulators for every productive worker... oh yeah... they are all going bankrupt....

                      We are not talking about 19th century child labor abuse where they put 8 year olds in mines and factories for 16 hour days 6 days a week for pitys sake.........

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Business info

                        Pretty easy- see your tax person and file sole proprietor business entity, get a tax indentification number(TIN). If from home get a home occupation permit from the city or township or if renting a shop in commercial zone you will not need the home occupation permit. Charge sales tax and keep track of it you may select to pay in sales tax collected only once a year if business in slow or part time. Come up a with a business name when you file the Sole Proprietorship, dream up a LOGO and check on trademarks for items you may manufacture and build. Do a patent search before building anything that maybe patented so you do not infringe? Always a chance you are and could get sued. Business insurance is optional? But only maybe 200 a year for part time welding. Much more for stuff that will be on the road and may require expensive inspections.
                        Hope that helped?
                        Virgil Johnson
                        www.trailpostdriver.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Starting a business

                          I am all for young people starting and running a business. I was 16 years old when I opened up a retail stroe (Sports cards and comics) The obsticles I ran into were not difficult to overcome. By law I was not able to enter into any contracts, so leases had to be in my parents name, insurance had to be in their name, and the business checking account had to have them as a co-signer. Credit cards in the business name was under them, that all changed when I turned 18.

                          As far as the agriculture distinction, it does depend on the state. Until 5 years ago Montana called landscape business and lawn care business as agriculture business. ( And yes there is a HUGE DIFFERENCE between a landscaper and a lawn care) Agriculture business are exempt from DOT regulations and requirements, and in Montana the need for a drivers liscence is different on certain months of the years (harvest, spring planting so the 12 year old kids can drive the grain trucks) So I have my class A CDLw/Airbreaks and have to follow all the rules of the road when I hall a skid loader, but a rancher can have 10 round bails of hay on his gooseneck sticking out past the fenders and drive with no worries, me I will have the white truck with the blue lights behind me if I try that.

                          As far as the rules and regulations that your local, state, and federal goveremtn requires abide by them whether you like them or not. Integrity in business is just as important as quality of work, or keeping your word. What makes you better then everyone else if you think that the rules don't or should not apply to you? Not only can it cost you in fines and reputation, but you may miss out on oppertunities from not having proper paperwprk, or the slight against your business name when the paper reports the fines and possible charges against it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Anybody that starts a business today should have a serious grasp about what they will encounter incuding the regulatory and legal burdens. It's a lot more important to understand the negatives than it is to know the potential positives.
                            The internet is full of advise for potential business owners that consist of "go for it, you'll do great", "once you get word of mouth you'll be golden", "do good work and the money will come".
                            Of course it's your life at risk, not theirs.
                            Sorry but I know of dozens of grown men, with solid decades of experience, within a few hundred miles of my house that have lost it all in todays economy. I've gone to several of the auctions where their lifes work went for penny's on the dollar and these were men who ran good business' for 20-30 years with a stable, regular base of work with 1 -30 employees making a good living.
                            The base went away tho, and they spent everything (well over 1 million US $) they had stashed for retirement and are working for hourly wages now. Guys who owned several houses and were planning on a pretty good life in retirement.
                            Other regions have other economic realities but the bottom line is that overall in America it's a harsh world right now in most areas of self employment and when there is nothing to weld, welding companies drop like flies.
                            Americans have always had and always will have the spirit to start a business but the failure rates in good economic times are high and they are worse right now. Hopefully that will change soon but there is less rod being burnt today than in a long time.
                            When guys who have extensive bidding and successfull job completion experience are going down the tubes left and right it becomes an even harsher environment for a inexperienced beginer to survive and thrive in.
                            It may get worse before it gets better and the more knowledge you have about the negatives the better.
                            The "welding for a living" world is not the "mow lawns for spending money" world. Look at the number of unemployed welders (a lot of them call me every day looking for work) and the number of long gone welding business'.
                            Look at the coalsmokes of the world, posted on the web like a real deal welding business, put less than a thousand hours on a machine in three years, live in Mom & Dads house and act all like a real virtual welding company. Gone like the wind, internet persona just a puff of smoke, in spite of the big time insults piled on people like me via the keyboard "I'm a badass and I learned all my terminology at a computer but I couldn't really hack it in the welding world.". That's the best example but there are a lot of others.
                            Your keyboard persona will not pay any bills. Keep in mind that regardless of your age you WILL meet a sweet young thing and take on considerable responsibilities later in life = $$$$ required. A happy family can be rather expensive.
                            So my best advise is to put a stopwatch to every task, record those numbers, learn to bid like a maniac and don't work by the hour, get off the interwebs, study your craft like no one else, buy every labor saving tool/piece of equipment and make your money on productivity.
                            A sound small business will always make much more money by quoting work and then pumping it out in spectacular productivity. Lot's of slugs are out there quoting jobs at slug rates, paying slug wages and getting hammered.
                            Oh and get several years real world hard money experience working for someone else (and using that stopwatch on someone else's nickle so you don't start out blind but have a super valuable database) before putting everything you own at risk.
                            That database is money, especially now where people are quoting work just to pay overhead.
                            Become an information sponge and absorb every money making trait and more importantly every money losing trait you see. Money losing businesses are on every corner, beat every dollar out of every bid and you can live a happy life and eat (plus a lot of other people can too) every day.
                            And allways remember, it's a people business not a welding business. Make people money and they will call you.
                            In my opinion this applies to small repair type to mid size contracting.

                            My take only so of course take it or more likely ignore it.

                            I hope everybody had as good a Christmas as we had. And I hope next year finds everybody busier than this, with a new president in place and EVERY SINGLE crooked idiot in Washington replaced : )

                            Ho Ho Ho!

                            JT

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good Advice

                              JTMcC
                              Good solid advice....


                              mauerick
                              and it is indeed a tough market... think probably the worst since the great depression... no matter how the politicians cook the books to make things sound better and improving... I am afraid that it will still get even worse in the next couple of years... don't spend a penny that you do not have in pocket.. buy your equipment outright.. time payment is an invitation to giving it back if the unforseen happens and you are unable to make payments and as JTMcC said, study and work your tail end off...
                              We presently have a terrible economy and the most business unfriendly administration in decades... so whatever you do, work hard and pay attention to every detail..
                              Business wise there is no "low hanging fruit" to sustain a business as there is in good times... every bit will be hard won...

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.