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flux core welding

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  • flux core welding

    i have a tb302 with a 12vs feeder. i am thinking about tring out flux core wire in it. this would be completely new to me. can i use my existing gun or do i have to get a defferent one? i think i am going to get a roll of .045 how about my drive rolls i have smooth in it at the moment. like i said never tried it before and would like to give it a shot. so any pointers would be usefull. thanks guy's

  • #2
    You can use your current gun just as it is but miller makes different nozzles that leave the contact tip protruding but completely cover the adapter giving you better access in tight spots. I'm not 100d% sure but I think you want knurled U drive rolls, someone with more knowledge will let you know. Also go to the resources section & look up the manual for your feeder it'll take 5 minutes & tell you everything you want, including part numbers.

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    • #3
      The only thing you will need to change is your drive rolls. Get a set of v-knurled ones. Tighten them just enough for the wire to not slip. You can use your "regular" mig gun. I always have & have left the nozzle on to protect the tip, etc. Sometimes I use a shortened nozzle that I cut myself. Keep in mind that the gun will get hotter due to no gas flow which helps cool the gun so if you have a small gun it could become an issue with lots of welding. I use a 400 amp gun & run .045 almost all the time & have never had an issue with innershield wire.

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      • #4
        I would use gas-shielded fluxcore, if you can. It's an all around better wire then the self-shield fluxcore.

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        • #5
          I was assuming you were talking about innershield wire (gasless). You can also run dualshield wire (flux core with gas) but still need the same v-groove knurled wheels. The dualshield is wind sensitive so it is not always a good choice for outdoor work. Innershield is not wind sensitive. Most innershield wires you hook the gun to neg & the work/ground to positive. Check the particular wire you get for the polarity.

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          • #6
            MMW i am talking about gasless. i think it would be nice to have something around when my gas bottle is empty (like on a sunday) and i want to mess around in the garage.

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            • #7
              In addition to the drive roller you will also have to get the proper contact tip in the end of the gun to feed the wire.

              Also make sure you have the polarity set to the proper one for the type of electrode. solid wire DCEP this is the welding lead or gun lead. Flux cored generally is DCEN For the best welds check the polarity. And turn the machine off before changing the lead at the feed mechanism, as some machines are live at this point if juice is on!

              The drive roller will have a number on the side. Number facing out, generally puts the correct groove in line with the wire feed. Most of the drive rollers have two different sized grooves on them, when installing make sure correct one is in place for the size wire.

              As they may work sort of with a larger groove, they generally will not work with a smaller sized groove.

              And of course when you switch back to gas

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              • #8
                now i know why i like this sight so much. if you ask a ? you get help. not like some of the other sights wear they smack talk you if you are not sure about something. THANKS EVERYONE

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                • #9
                  Quote by PTsideshow "In addition to the drive roller you will also have to get the proper contact tip in the end of the gun to feed the wire."

                  While you need the correct size contact tip you don't need a special tip for any fluxcore wires vs. solid wires.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Daniel View Post
                    I would use gas-shielded fluxcore, if you can. It's an all around better wire then the self-shield fluxcore.


                    Define "all around better wire".
                    I'm guessing you haven't tryed to build many tents atop a mountain or in a valley. In heavy winds.
                    Flux core is used where it's used for some very good reasons.
                    Don't confuse "easy to run" with "better".

                    J

                    I should add that even inside, FC is used in a lot of applications (look at heavy equipment construction) where the designer want's to save welding time ($$$) by taking advantage of the deep penetration FC gives. That effectively reduces the required size on fillet welds and that = large money in the bank.
                    Last edited by JTMcC; 10-07-2011, 03:30 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Educate me

                      "...would use gas-shielded fluxcore, if you can. It's an all around better wire then the self-shield fluxcore...."

                      "...you were talking about innershield wire (gasless). You can also run dualshield wire (flux core with gas) but still...."

                      I thought wire was gas-shielded (from a bottle) or flux -cored (for use without a bottle)
                      • What is "innershield"
                      • Is "gas-shielded fluxcore" flux wire used with bottle gas?
                      • Is "dualshield fluxcore used with gas from the bottle?




                      Until reading this, I thought you used flux-core with the proper polarity setting and without necessarily using a nozzle for rough work, for added penetration, and for outside windy conditions. Gas (CO2, Argon/CO2) was used with a nozzle and a different polarity inside for clean work.

                      The discussions referenced above seem to indicate the use of flux-core in combination with gas and/or different types of shielding resulting from using flux core wire.

                      I'm confused. Would someone explain this to me. Things were simpler when I was a kid building cotton trailers a long, long, time ago.

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                      • #12
                        Never heard the term "gas shielded flux core" I think he means dual shield. Shield gas from a bottle with tubular (flux filled) wire.

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                        • #13
                          Inner shield just means flux cored same as coreshield. Gas shielded flux core gives better welds with easier clean up than just fluxcore by itself. More expensive process but less repairs. Any gas shield is better suited for indoors. The letter T on the electrode designation stands for "tubular" meaning flux filled wire.

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                          • #14
                            Inner shield wire is a flux cored tubular wire. It needs no shielding gas, hence the term inner shield. Dual shield wire is a flux cored tubular wire that uses shielding gas. Outer shield wire is only shielded by the gas.

                            I wish the random statements such as "dual shield gives better welds than flux core" would stop. Each wire used in the applications that they are made for gives the best welds for that application. I can lay very nice looking welds that pass code with inner shield or dualshield or stick. Most people that knock "flux core" have used it with a 110 migwelder & have not used it with a properly setup dialed in machine.

                            There is no one wire that fits all and does everything exceptional. That is why they make different ones. Pick the correct wire for the job at hand.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MMW View Post
                              Inner shield wire is a flux cored tubular wire. It needs no shielding gas, hence the term inner shield. Dual shield wire is a flux cored tubular wire that uses shielding gas. Outer shield wire is only shielded by the gas.

                              I wish the random statements such as "dual shield gives better welds than flux core" would stop. Each wire used in the applications that they are made for gives the best welds for that application.
                              I never looked at the wire that way but you are right...Bob

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