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Hitch plate for a dump truck

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  • #16
    Originally posted by NathanH View Post
    Don't be so discouraged. Yes, it is a major safety issue making sure that the hitch is secure to the truck frame. As for welding, you are safe welding anything behind the rear most spring shackle. The issues with welding the HS steel frames is not that the weld will not hold but weakening the frame around the welded area. We install several hundred hitch plates a year. I will post a couple pics of what a typical MD truck hitch plate looks like. 95% are welded in with Lincoln Power Mig 255's. The 1" are pushing it. LOL. You want the plate recessed into the frame, substantial gussets and any vertical welds have to be done uphill. Typical price would be $795 for a MD 3/4" plate. May be further ahead having someone do it.[ATTACH=CONFIG]27781[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]27782[/ATTACH]
    See post #6, The OP is talking about towing a combined trailer/machine weight of 30,000 pounds. Not a MD (medium duty) hitch. This is not for a 2" or 2.5" slide in reciever hitch as you pictured. Just don't want someone getting the wrong idea.
    MM250
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    • #17
      Originally posted by MMW View Post
      See post #6, The OP is talking about towing a combined trailer/machine weight of 30,000 pounds. Not a MD (medium duty) hitch. This is not for a 2" or 2.5" slide in reciever hitch as you pictured. Just don't want someone getting the wrong idea.
      Its kinda obvious he not talking about a slide in hitch because if you look at the pic he posted there is already one on the truck next to the lic. plate. Being a member of the demolition and heavy equipment industry I would say check with a dealership or specialist on something like this plus I would not trust MIG for something like seeing as how all the steel dump bodies ( also noticed that your is aluminum) are stick welded thats kinda what I would go with.

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      • #18
        I would not trust MIG for something like seeing as how all the steel dump bodies ( also noticed that your is aluminum) are stick welded thats kinda what I would go with.[/QUOTE]

        i had to laugh at this one. whens the last time you walked into a truck equipment shop and saw someone building a body and stick welding it together? or any steel product manufacturer for that matter.

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        • #19
          For us MD trucks are any thing with a GCWR of 26K to 60K. HD trucks are have a 60K or more GCWR. I am guessing the vehicle you have should be in the 60K range. Pulling the trailer should be no problem for the truck itself. The issue will be stopping the loaded trailer. You must have some types of brakes on the trailer itself and normally a 30K trailer is going to have air brakes. Does your truck have a "tractor" brake package to run out to the trailer? That can be more expensive to install that the hitch plate if not installed! Can it be MIGed, yes. We are a production shop and install these day in and out with MIG. Have not had a single failure. Key is to recess it in the frame. Don't be tempted to just butt a plate up against the back of the frame and weld on. Doomed to fail that way. Attached is a pic of a MD 1" plate that regularly pulls up to 50K both on and off road. This is one of a fleet of 22 identical trucks and is probably more what you are after. All were done with MIG. Helps to bevel the back of the plate to get in there good with the weld. That said the 211 may be a little light for what you want to do. Clean up that frame before any welding.

          Click image for larger version

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          Campbell Hausfeld 110V MIG
          Jo Ann Fabrics Hot Glue Gun

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          • #20
            Nathan
            Since you do this sort of work all the time I have a question for you...in fact it was mentioned in this thread. I know truck mfgs give instructions not to weld on the frame. Clearly since you're welding on the frame it must not apply to the entire thing. So, what areas (of the frame) can you weld on and what sort of procedures/precautions do you have to follow/take when applying a hitch?
            Last edited by HayFarmer; 07-28-2011, 06:53 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by NathanH View Post
              Don't be so discouraged. Yes, it is a major safety issue making sure that the hitch is secure to the truck frame. As for welding, you are safe welding anything behind the rear most spring shackle. The issues with welding the HS steel frames is not that the weld will not hold but weakening the frame around the welded area. We install several hundred hitch plates a year. I will post a couple pics of what a typical MD truck hitch plate looks like. 95% are welded in with Lincoln Power Mig 255's. The 1" are pushing it. LOL. You want the plate recessed into the frame, substantial gussets and any vertical welds have to be done uphill. Typical price would be $795 for a MD 3/4" plate. May be further ahead having someone do it.
              Originally posted by NathanH View Post
              For us MD trucks are any thing with a GCWR of 26K to 60K. HD trucks are have a 60K or more GCWR. I am guessing the vehicle you have should be in the 60K range. Pulling the trailer should be no problem for the truck itself. The issue will be stopping the loaded trailer. You must have some types of brakes on the trailer itself and normally a 30K trailer is going to have air brakes. Does your truck have a "tractor" brake package to run out to the trailer? That can be more expensive to install that the hitch plate if not installed! Can it be MIGed, yes. We are a production shop and install these day in and out with MIG. Have not had a single failure. Key is to recess it in the frame. Don't be tempted to just butt a plate up against the back of the frame and weld on. Doomed to fail that way. Attached is a pic of a MD 1" plate that regularly pulls up to 50K both on and off road. This is one of a fleet of 22 identical trucks and is probably more what you are after. All were done with MIG. Helps to bevel the back of the plate to get in there good with the weld. That said the 211 may be a little light for what you want to do. Clean up that frame before any welding.

              According to you, all vertical welds are to be uphill. Then why are they ran downhill in your last picture? Click image for larger version

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              Last edited by Country Metals; 07-28-2011, 08:41 AM.

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              • #22
                for the record

                Originally posted by cayager View Post
                I would not trust MIG for something like seeing as how all the steel dump bodies ( also noticed that your is aluminum) are stick welded thats kinda what I would go with.

                i had to laugh at this one. whens the last time you walked into a truck equipment shop and saw someone building a body and stick welding it together? or any steel product manufacturer for that matter.
                just to let you know the steel dump bodies are made on more of a built to order scale there not mass produced due in large part that most of people don't want the same thing prime example i have an end dump company and all of our trailers are built buy Hanson trailers.
                HANSON trailers are custom built to every individual customers needs. In business for 30 years, we have been there and done that.
                All models are constructed of Hardox AR450 wear resistant plate, 3/16”, 1/4”, 5/16”, 3/8”.

                Plus the fact I had a local guy renting space from me building dump bodies and i sat there and watched him stick weld so dont try to tell me it isn't done this isn't about speed of production its about quality not quantity. Next you are going to try to say that commercial and military vessel aren't stick welded I know a structual guy that used to do that in San Diego, Ca for a living and even at that point the closes you would get to MIG is Flux-Core


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                • #23
                  Country, good eye. Do as I say not as I do. LOL. I am assuming this had a downhill cover pass done over some nasty looking uphills.
                  Yes, MIG is great for production. We would be out of business if stick was all we used. That being said, the OP should use stick. This is a one off and quickness should be second to making a quality product. For safetys sake. I am still more concerned that the truck is equipped to run the brakes on the trailer. That could pose the biggest issue vs just installing the plate.
                  Campbell Hausfeld 110V MIG
                  Jo Ann Fabrics Hot Glue Gun

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                  • #24
                    Your Hitch is only as strong as your welds

                    Make sure you have the correct hitch for your vehicle and the trailer being towed.Check the hitch attachment area of the the truck. Do not attach a hitch to a truck which shows excessive corrosion or damage in the hitch attachment areas. Take the appropriate safety precautions. Its not worth someone getting hurt because you did not do the work right. Make sure you know what you are able to tow and stick to that.

                    Ken
                    KG Equipment Service

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by NathanH View Post
                      Don't be so discouraged. Yes, it is a major safety issue making sure that the hitch is secure to the truck frame. As for welding, you are safe welding anything behind the rear most spring shackle. The issues with welding the HS steel frames is not that the weld will not hold but weakening the frame around the welded area. We install several hundred hitch plates a year. I will post a couple pics of what a typical MD truck hitch plate looks like. 95% are welded in with Lincoln Power Mig 255's. The 1" are pushing it. LOL. You want the plate recessed into the frame, substantial gussets and any vertical welds have to be done uphill. Typical price would be $795 for a MD 3/4" plate. May be further ahead having someone do it.[ATTACH=CONFIG]27781[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]27782[/ATTACH]
                      What if there is only room to butt the plate against the end of the frame rails versus recessed?

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