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Spot welder LMSW-52 with sheared bolt for handle... repair help

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  • Spot welder LMSW-52 with sheared bolt for handle... repair help

    I have a Miller spot welder (model LMSW-52) and the bolt which you can tighten to put more or less pressure on the electrodes when you push down on the handle has bent and snapped in two, with "normal" use. Now that I no longer have a handle to open/close the electrodes... the spot welder cannot be used. I've contacted Miller and they say I can get a replacement bolt, nut, and pin (that holds the bolt in place) from a distributor. My problem is that I have not seen pins like this before, which seem to hold everything on this machine together. I don't know how to remove the pin holding the sheared bolt in place, or how I would insert a new pin if I buy one. I tried to just "hammer it through" with a steel rod thats slightly smaller diameter but I couldn't get it to budge. Any suggestions?

    I've attached an image so you can see what I'm looking at here: Click image for larger version

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    Last edited by karam; 01-27-2011, 02:00 PM.

  • #2
    Looks like a roll pin....Put a little heat on the cast part to expand it....and use a pin punch that is the same size as the rollpin to drive it out.....A bucking bar or a hammer used on the opposite side will help your efforts when driving the pin out...Good Luck

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    • #3
      You should not even have to heat it in fact I would not suggest doing that, you should be able to drive it out with a pin punch and a hammer.
      Kevin Schuh
      Service Technician
      Miller Electric Mfg. Co.

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      • #4
        Normal use - yeah right . It's a standard roll pin. Not a big deal to remove one, but it's best to use a roll pin punch instead of a standard punch. A roll pin punch has a small nub on the end to keep it centered.

        This is a gunsmithing video, but principle is the same.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4_k8OvjwAY
        2007 Miller Dynasty 200 DX
        2005 Miller Passport 180

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MR.57 View Post
          Normal use - yeah right . It's a standard roll pin. Not a big deal to remove one, but it's best to use a roll pin punch instead of a standard punch. A roll pin punch has a small nub on the end to keep it centered.

          This is a gunsmithing video, but principle is the same.
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k4_k8OvjwAY
          lol...glad i'm not the only one that got raised eyebrows over the "normal use". normal farm use....get a bigger hammer to close the handle. only roll pin i have ever encountered where i had a slight problem was where someone used a standard over sized punch to install it and peened the lip over the pin driving it to deep. easy fix was to drive it on through the other side then dress the bent edge of the hole.
          miller 225 bobcat
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          if first you don't succeed
          trash the b#####d

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          • #6
            Square the end of a piece of pipe(just large enough to let the pin fall though) or a bushing and use it to back up the down side of the handle. Place the pipe in a good solid vice and drive the pin into the pipe or better still use an arbor press. The handle looks like aluminum and if you heat it , it may weaken enough to break when you strike it in it's hot condition
            Take care,
            Meltedmetal.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Meltedmetal View Post
              Square the end of a piece of pipe(just large enough to let the pin fall though) or a bushing and use it to back up the down side of the handle. Place the pipe in a good solid vice and drive the pin into the pipe or better still use an arbor press. The handle looks like aluminum and if you heat it , it may weaken enough to break when you strike it in it's hot condition
              Take care,
              Meltedmetal.
              I'm sure they figured it out as that thread is almost 2 years old.

              Comment


              • #8
                Right you are--I didn't look at the date. Now the question is why did it come up in at the top of the list on my computer with the rest of today's posts?? Internet demons??
                Meltedmetal

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