Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Does powder coating harden the metal?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Does powder coating harden the metal?

    I bought a HF powder coating system, and I was thinking about the process to cure it. It requires you to heat the metal to 400 for about 20 min.

    Isn't that the same process for heat treating metal to make mild steel hardened? Also what happens to alum when you heat it to 400 for 20 min?

  • #2
    Not hot enough to harden steel

    The object that has been powder coated goes into an oven that bakes the coating for 20-30 minutes at 400 degrees. The coating may be up to 400 degrees, but most of the steel isn't. The steel isn't in the oven long enough to warm up much, but this depends on how thick the material is.
    The steel must be spotless before coating and no pinholes in the welds or pockets to hold water if the stuff is washed beforehand. We warm up everything for about a half hour, let it cool, then coat it and bake it.
    I cannot give any advice for powder coating galvanized steel because it is more complicated and picky to get a good, hard bond. It is almost an art. I do not powder coat, but work with 3 guys that do.
    Last edited by deafman; 07-04-2010, 09:06 AM.

    Comment


    • #3
      powdercoating

      did someone say something about steel? who says it's an art form, that is silly. i can say this since i have installed two large commercial lines and also have had thousands of feet of rail powdercoated. wasn't the question about deformation of aluminum at 400 f? use a reputable powder coater and not an artist and you won't have any problems. good to consult about configuration of item to be coated to make sure the design lends itself to powdercoating.

      Comment


      • #4
        well slap me upside the head. he wants to know if it 400 f is sufficient to heat treat mild steel. either way, it is the blind leading the blind in a lot of these posts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Not even close to worrying about. this a broad explaination of hardening steel. You harden (high carbon) steel by heating it to critical (non magnetic) around 1400-1500f then quench the steel in oil water or brine depending on the type of steel. The part is not very hard and brittle so you now temper it by heating it up again to a lower temperature to temper or drawback the hardness of the steel to what is desired usually 400-700f range. You will not harden mild steel.
          Miller syncrowave 200 runner with coolmate 4
          and wp2025 weldcraft torch
          Miller 125c plasma cutter

          Comment


          • #6
            Aluminum can be artifically aged by heat treating, between 400 to 600 degrees F for 6 to 8 hours. It makes the material harder and more machinable. Powdercoating Aluminum does nothing to the aluminum.

            Powder Coating of Steel Parts, even those made from sheet steel do not get harder by the baking/curing process, the time is too short and the heat too low.
            '77 Miller Bluestar 2E on current service truck
            '99 Miller Bobcat 225NT for New Service Truck
            '85 Millermatic 200 in Shop

            '72 Marquete 295 AC cracker box in Shop
            '07 Hypertherm Powermax 1000 G3 Plasma Cutter in Shop
            Miller Elite and Digital Elite Hoods

            Comment


            • #7
              What about 5356?

              I would like to know what a metalurgist or an engineer with the relevant degree would have to say about the effects of the oven curing process on 5356 filler.
              IOW if you are making something using 5356 filler, and knowing it is not recommended for continuous usage above 150 degrees, does that oven baking process have any effect on the ultimate strength of the welds?

              www.facebook.com/outbackaluminumwelding
              Miller Dynasty 700...OH YEA BABY!!
              MM 350P...PULSE SPRAYIN' MONSTER
              Miller Dynasty 280 with AC independent expansion card
              Miller Dynasty 200 DX "Blue Lightning"

              Miller Bobcat 225 NT (what I began my present Biz with!)
              Miller 30-A Spoolgun
              Miller WC-115-A
              Miller Spectrum 300
              Miller 225 Thunderbolt (my first machine bought new 1980)
              Miller Digital Elite Titanium 9400

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
                I would like to know what a metalurgist or an engineer with the relevant degree would have to say about the effects of the oven curing process on 5356 filler.
                IOW if you are making something using 5356 filler, and knowing it is not recommended for continuous usage above 150 degrees, does that oven baking process have any effect on the ultimate strength of the welds?
                fusion, when i worked in the sign shop, i made MANY heavy sign frames that were spec'd for 5356 filler, and designed to be hurricane proof . the coating process spec'd for powder.... engineers designed it, i just welded it..... *shrugs*
                welder_one

                nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
                www.sicfabrications.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks...

                  Now I can get on with makin things pretty

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X