Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Chop Saw Brand

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by SundownIII View Post
    Don't you just love these forums?

    OP, who's a new poster, comes on the board and asks for recommendations on brands of "chop saws". To me, that would indicate that he probably has a saw in mind in the $100-$200 range, since that's where most "chop saws" fall.

    Several posters point out the difference in cut quality between the abrasive cut saws and the newer "dry cut" saws. Although a little of a reach from the OP's original question, I can easily see the comparison.

    Then, along comes ol BC Iron works, who just last week blasted Miller for not providing him enough with enough bandwidth to "post his photos". His recommendation is that the OP go out and buy a $1,500+ bandsaw. Then posts photos bragging about "his saw". Then, on top of that, posts a second time showing "cuts" from his saw. BIG FREAKING DEAL. Nowhere do I remember the OP asking for recommendations for chop saw vs bandsaw.

    Just seems unfortunate to me that Mr BC didn't avail himself of the opportunity to GTFO when shown the door in his previous posting. Bite the hand that feeds you, but come back for more right away.

    Oh well. Just my .02.
    I'm behind you on this on man.

    Actually I have a Dewalt and it has always worked for me. I guess I learned how to use the tool. What a concept!!
    Nick
    Nick
    Miller 252 Mig
    Miller Cricket XL
    Millermatic 150 Mig
    Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
    2-O/A outfits
    Jet Lathe and Mill
    Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
    DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
    Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
    20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
    Propane Forge
    60" X 60" router/plasma table

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
    Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
    and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

    Comment


    • #17
      Monte,

      We don't agree on much so I'm glad we found some "common ground".

      To me, every shop needs a basic chopsaw. I too have the DeWalt. Not the greatest saw and not the greatest cuts, but for whacking off rebar or hacking metal, it's the go to tool vs the dry cut saw.

      No one tool does everything "the best". My chop saw is dirty and fast. The Porter Cable dry cut saw is fast, accurate, and a great tool. Still, though, it doesn't take the place of a good bandsaw.

      A while back one of the mechanics in the yard asked me if he could use the DeWalt for cutting a 2" SS boat shaft. I kinda laughed and say, "Sure, take the saw up the other shop". Well, about 30 minutes he was back with the saw and a worn out abrasive blade. His comment, "That shaft just ATE the blade". Stuck the shaft in the bandsaw, and 2 minutes later the cut was done. Different strokes for different folks.

      Know your tools and how to use them.

      I still want to see the guy who throws a horizontal band saw in the back of his pickup and takes it to the jobsite to cut rebar.
      Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
      Dynasty 200 DX
      Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
      Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
      Hobart HH187
      Dialarc 250 AC/DC
      Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
      Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
      PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
      Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
      Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
      More grinders than hands

      Comment


      • #18
        Sundown III ..........actually my saw is a drycut saw..carbide tipped.
        At least we have found some "common ground" . I do appreciate your input on the forum. BUT, you can be a rascal at times.........that's OK though.
        Nick
        Nick
        Miller 252 Mig
        Miller Cricket XL
        Millermatic 150 Mig
        Miller Syncrowave 200 Tig
        2-O/A outfits
        Jet Lathe and Mill
        Jet 7x12 horz/vert band saw
        DeWalt Multi Cutter metal saw
        Century 50 Amp Plasma Cutter
        20 ton electric/hydraulic vertical press
        Propane Forge
        60" X 60" router/plasma table

        www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTu7wicVCmQ
        Vist my site: www.nixstuff.com
        and check out some of my ironwork and other stuff

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by monte55 View Post
          I'm behind you on this on man.

          Actually I have a Dewalt and it has always worked for me. I guess I learned how to use the tool. What a concept!!
          Nick
          Every Dewalt saw, dry or cold has a cheap vise on it, both for staying tight and staying at the 0 degree mark. That retaining ring on the back of the shaft just doesn't cut it. The Dewalt guard is junk too. Those are the reasons for my dislike of the saw, they do seem to last well though, just not a good saw compared to the Milwaukee. The Dewalt is 10 or 15 bucks more and I cannot figure out why. As far as the Porter Cable goes, I have never used one. Always thought of them as good woodworker tools. Tools are supposed to make me money not cost me money, when I am spending time working on them on a portable job it is costing me, not to mention it looks bad to the customer.

          I fell off of the Dewalt bandwagon a few years ago. I think they are now a mid grade tool and not an industrial tool.

          I will agree that operator error is the main culprit in saw failure/poor performance, I guess on every tool.

          Comment


          • #20
            i use a Milwaukee at my home shop and it does what it's supposed to. I'm sure the Dewalt would do the same. Either way, the trick is a good "blade" as close to full diameter as possible. Surface speed is the key. I've never used one, but I would think some of the lesser priced saws would be underpowered and cause one to speak in tongues.

            I use the chop saw at home because I don't have the need or funds to support a real bandsaw. One that has a good 1" blade, coolant system, stout guide blocks, etc. Any bandsaw in the price range of a chop saw isn't going to have these things.

            Places where I have worked that did have a real bandsaw the only use I ever really had for an abrasive saw was Thompson rod and similar hardened materials. Other than that I consider them dust spewing, sparking, deafening spawns of satan.

            Al
            Miller Dialarc 250 HF
            Lincoln Classic 300D
            AutoCAD 2010...Paper Is Cheaper Than Metal
            Hypertherm Powermax 45
            Milwaukee & Hilti Power Tools
            John Deere Equipment
            Paints and Quarterhorses
            Billy Cook Roping Saddle
            Billy Cook Reining Saddle
            Our YouTube Channel

            Comment


            • #21
              I noticed that the OP did not mention what price range they were looking for, just a " good" chop saw. If portability is not an issue, build your own. There are many good abrasive saws with 12 to 14" blades and around a true 5 hp motor with magnetic starter on the market. These put the home improvement store saws to shame. Be aware that they require a blade made for higher hosepower saws, but they are commonly available. If you are resourceful, you could probably build one for a reasonable price.
              Sometimes there's no second chances.

              Comment


              • #22
                http://www.jepsonpowertools.com/product/metal_saws.html

                I have a 9312S

                Comment


                • #23
                  I bought a Evolution Rage2 dry cut saw about 5 months ago and I'm very happy with it compared to my abrasive chop saw.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BC Iron works View Post
                    go with a good band saw
                    Who makes this bandsaw?
                    Millermatic 185 + Shopping cart .. cart
                    Metabo 4 1/2" grinders.
                    Milwaukee v18 cordless drills and jobsite radio!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      chop saw

                      I was looking at a dry cut and also between a milwaukee, dewalt, or else its call real gear its a chinese brand. I wouldnt mind getting a bandsaw but I dont have the room

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Cheese,

                        I use the Porter Cable dry cut saw and have been very happy with it. PC no longer makes the saw, but one of the saws built by Evolution looks like they used the same design.

                        If I was replacing the saw today, there would be no question. I would go with the Milwaukee. Best table/vice setup I've seen.

                        On the dry cut saws the vice/clamping mechanism is ultra critical because of the way the saws operate, especially when cutting stock at a 45 deg angle. The blade will try to "pull" the material. If not securely clamped, it will pull the stock and wipe out the teeth on the blade. Had it happen to one of my guys. Not only took out about 10 teeth on the blade, but think it also filled his britches(although he claimed not).

                        After that incident, I generally make it a practice to use an additional clamp (in addition to the normal vice) to secure the workpiece.

                        The dry cut saws are great for speed and accuracy, but as said previously, they don't do everything well. For instance, rebar will destroy a blade. SS will wear out a blade very quickly.

                        I'm not a big fan of the Milwaukee blades. I use the Freud Metal Devil blades on my saw (internet for about $40). They seem to hold up well and are the best priced blades I've found.
                        Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                        Dynasty 200 DX
                        Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                        Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                        Hobart HH187
                        Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                        Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                        Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                        PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                        Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                        Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                        More grinders than hands

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          for a very well built "cheaper" abrasive saw, look at the ridgid line of choppers. i have one that rides around on the bed of one of my trucks and it gets used, abused and put up wet regular. the fence stays put, even on hard miters, the fence pivots to mitre in both directions, and the clamp clamps pretty snug. i have a dewalt abrasive saw as well, and i wasted my money on that one. it stays behind as a back up, or trash cutter.

                          the milwauke dry cut saw is a metal eating lil devil, but a lil on the pricy side for a beginner. the ridgid abrasive saw is around 140 bucks from home depot...
                          welder_one

                          nothing fancy, just a few hot glue guns for metal
                          www.sicfabrications.com

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            That is the 3rd time recently that I have heard someone compliment the rigid chop saw.

                            I got a couple of the freud blades, I agree they are good. The Lennox blades are good too.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              chop saw

                              I narrowed my choices down to the evolution rage 2 and the milwaukee chop saw also ridgid to so I think I will look more at them. I would like to get a chop saw that will last and not break down on me within a couple months. Thank you for all your guys help.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                For a basic, abrasive, chop saw, I have the Dewalt. The problem with abrasive saws is they are not very accurate. When cutting angles the blade will flex, when cutting straight they melt through the material so the kerf is a function of how hard you press on the blade and how much your trying to cut at that second - try cutting stainless exhaust pipe - requires a lot of work to get the fit-up correct. But its cheap. I think I paid $150 at either Home Depot or Lowes for it. Be warned, it says 15 Amps on the side and it will pop a 15 Amp breaker if you try to cut too fast.

                                I also have the milwaukee dry cut. The machine, without blade, costs more than the Dewalt. It does have a better clamp and it seems more accurate but I'm paranoid about that $50 blade so on dirty/quick cuts I reach for the abrasive saw. At least for straight cuts on straight material, it does a great job.

                                I also have a small, 4" capacity horizontal band saw. Its an early JET model complete with crappy bearings on the wheels etc. I have not figured out the best blade to use on stainless or the best settings. I kinda bought it because a local professional exhaust place used a similar model to cut stainless pipe. That guy told me you can cut stainless but you need a slightly higher blade speed than for steel. We are talking 16 gauge stainless. Used these things can be had for just over $200.

                                At work I have access to a very very small machine shop with a Dayton band saw. That saw is abused with everything from plastic to aluminum to stainless going through it. So far that has given me the most control over cuts in pre-bend exhaust pipe. That's a off-shore $2000 machine, weighs a ton, and I don't have room for something like it.

                                However, I'm thinking of ditching the bandsaw in favor of the Milwaukee portable band saw. See this:
                                http://www.swagoffroad.com/Porta_ban...t_Product.html

                                Dual use tools are good.

                                Now if I could just get him to machine in a slot for a guide...
                                Con Fuse!
                                Miller Dynasty 350
                                Millermatic 350P
                                -Spoolmatic 30A

                                Hypertherm PowerMax 1000G3
                                Miller Multimatic 200 - awesome portable MIG (and stick and TIG)
                                Miller Maxstar 200DX - portable TIG and stick

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X