Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Alumiweld Rod for wleding aluminum ??

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Alumiweld Rod for wleding aluminum ??

    Any input on this rod for welding aluminum I was told you can use a propane torch or O/A to weld with this rod

    got a aluminum water tank and it's not important that it hold high pressure
    or that the weld even looks good just needs to fix the seapage it has under about 10 psi was told this rod will work as good as tigging it

    has any one used this rod before and how was the outcome of it is it all that they claim??

    Thanks for any input on this

    CH!

  • #2
    Are you talking about "alumaloy". If so 10psi is a tall order for that stuff.
    T.J.

    Comment


    • #3
      Call a plumber

      IMO it is CRAP.
      It is solder. It has been around forever. People simply took an existing product and changed the way it was marketed. It simply has a lower melting point than aluminum and adheres to non-ferrous metals.
      It requires virtually the same prep as welding.
      Something as large as a tank may require a good deal of heat depending on the mass of the area you are working with.
      Using that product could have some benefits such as working with an area that may have corroded thru.
      If it is somewhere that a weld has failed then I doubt it will help much.
      Everyone expects this to work with propane....that is seldom the case. you could spend the rest of you life heating it and never get it hot enuff to work unless it is small and thin (like a pop can) It is used with MAPP gas and they don't tell you unless you ask.
      If this tank has water in the area of repair it must be removed before anything will work.
      In the 14 years I have operated an Aluminum only welding biz I have never once used this product. When I encounter a situation that this is the only way to get by I would submit a bid for a permanent repair (like a patch) instead..... IMO solder is for plumbers and fusion is for welders!

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the input guys never mess with it just heard about it thought id ask about it was going to pick some up just to fart around with it a bit before trying any repair to the tank in this case it really is cheaper just picking up a used tank any way besides its not really an important project

        And Thanks for chiming in it is appreciated.

        CH!

        Comment


        • #5
          It's not total crap. If you need to fix holes in your beer cans it just might be the ticket. Tip..You have to drink the beer first. The more beer you drink, the better you wil become. Just think... A mobile beer can soldering rig. Initial
          cost to get going is low.

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree and disagree with the previous posts. I've used this product in the past and it works if used for its' intended purpose. It's not a replacement for a good aluminum weld but if you need to build up a lug area ( like a broken lug on an alternator mount), it will work if you follow the application procedures. It's also useful in repairing aluminum door handles and window hardware. I have done so and been successful. This was before I got a tig machine, however.

            I'll still use it if the item to be repaired lends itself to the product. As for sealing a leak in an aluminum container, I don't think you'll have any problems. If properly applied, it should withstand 10 psi easily. This stuff sets up pretty hard and if the base is properly cleaned, heated, and the rod is used as per the instructions, you get a strong bond.

            This is just my experience though. Each person will have their own belief as to whether it works for them or not.

            In addition, I don't think I would call this an aluminum welding rod. To me it is more like an aluminum brazing rod.
            Last edited by Old Sporty; 02-09-2010, 03:41 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Try it....

              Not to sound like an info commerical here but what do you have to loose? Its not a critical repair, the stuff is cheap. Spend 20 bucks it might work! I have seen its use in the past to repair leaking pontoons on boats and it worked much bettar than I thought it would. I think the hardest part is getting enough heat on a large area, but if you have oxy/act it would be easy.
              Try it then post the results, I believe this has been argued for a while around here and it would be nice to see a field trail...
              Kevin

              Comment


              • #8
                Well I pretty much abandon the idea of using it to patch the tank

                But i just might take some advice here and pick up a few houndred pounds of it and start my own emergency mobile beer can repair service


                But on a more serious note I may just pick some up to just fart around with it and see how it works.

                any way here is a link to HF store where i found some

                http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=44810
                Last edited by CrazyHorse!; 02-10-2010, 12:34 PM.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Hey CH,
                  Here's a couple pics of the aluminum alloy rod I use on occasion for mostly diecast repairs & some of the odd very thin easy repairs I get in on occasion. It is very handy &, believe me, quite lucrative fixing those broken garbage diecast decorative items many people treasure. I use the older series rod, HTS-735, the predecessor of HTS-2000, from Charles Kimbrough in Texas as I like this one best. I'm sure others such as Alumiweld are also ok. Need to do some practice to obtain superb results. It works quite well & is surprisingly strong. You must also remember that TIG is welding & this rod is a brazing rod that utilizes the "capillary" action of brazing to bond & not the "fusion" action of TIG. I use both MAPP & O/A for most repairs, although propane will work on very thin metal adequately. This rod is not crap, works well, & will fix those "crap" broken diecast items nicely. I have made some very nice $$$ fixing those garbage metal mixed items that would be discarded normally by most. Also got some superb referenced work that also resulted in nice $$$$. Who doesn't like to make good $$$ for easy jobs? Get some & try it.... you never know.

                  Denny

                  Here's the fellow I get mine from: http://cgi.ebay.com/1USA-WELDING-ROD...item3c9b2b9068
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'm not going to comment on the usefulness/utility of the subject aluminum rods, but I will say this (based on experience).

                    If you think you'll EVER need to tig the repair to get it to hold, DO NOT try to do a "quick fix" with alumarod (or whatever). The stuff is a "B1TCH" to remove and get back to a tiggable surface. With any of this stuff present, it will be nearly impossible to get a good tig weld.

                    That's my .02 on the subject.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Hey guys,
                      Yes, I do agree with SundownIII's assessment. You really need to know if any aluminum is pure/alloy aluminum, or the composition aluminum that is referred as diecast. Most diecast composition alum. alloys contain zinc, copper, lead, tin, antimony, & other garbage metals melted together & poured into castings. Also, most who have experienced it can see the brittleness of its' nature. It is a cheap method that does have uses as most can see & is much more inexpensive to produce.

                      With all the aluminum repairs I get in, I can determine the composition by examining the grain structure as diecast is quite porous & a slight touch with grinding wheel verifies. I do a lot of aluminum castings & other repairs with TIG or MIG only. The other facet of success with the alum. brazing rods is to clean the joint just as you would do any MIG or TIG weld. Cleanliness is primary concern with any aluminum or even that crappy diecast.

                      Denny

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I will agree with Yorkie.... I can see the uses of this product. It had usefullness from the day it was developed many years ago.
                        It works wonderful for filling bulletholes.
                        My problem is with the "snake oil" type of marketing that is used to sell it.
                        Everyone wants to use it on applications that the original part failed and is seldom "stronger". So from my point of view...esp. when I usually find it like Sundown does, ie, where it DOESN'T belong is it is crap
                        Read the sales pitch on the HF ad even!!. I consider it out and out lieing. Nothing miraculous about it IMO.
                        BTW... aluminum is "die-cast" widely all over the world and is welded readily.
                        "POT METAL" is also die-casted and is what I suspect is Yorkiepap is referring to. I can identify if very quicly because it is much heavier than aluminum.
                        I get almost zero call for POT METAL repairs because I mainly do marine repairs but I do have antique cars and parts around and am aware of the material and how to repair it.
                        I will concure tho Yorkiepap, if people start a trend of bringing me pot metal castings I will have no problem using these rods...we even stock them in our parts store
                        These are my opinions tho and I made sure I stated that on my first post. Not trying to call anyone out. I consider it pretty much the same thing as brazing something steel that would be able to be welded best with a process like stick or mig.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Heck I will even add that I am glad to see Yorkiepap (or anyone for that matter) is using that stuff for what it is/was legitimately made/mfg for, in spite of all the hype.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by CrazyHorse! View Post
                            Any input on this rod for welding aluminum I was told you can use a propane torch or O/A to weld with this rod

                            got a aluminum water tank and it's not important that it hold high pressure
                            or that the weld even looks good just needs to fix the seapage it has under about 10 psi was told this rod will work as good as tigging it

                            has any one used this rod before and how was the outcome of it is it all that they claim??

                            Thanks for any input on this

                            CH!
                            Originally posted by CrazyHorse! View Post
                            02-09-2010 09:08 AM
                            CrazyHorse! Thanks for the input guys never mess with it just heard about it thought id ask about it was going to pick some up just to fart around with it a bit before trying any repair to the tank in this case it really is cheaper just picking up a used tank any way besides its not really an important project

                            And Thanks for chiming in it is appreciated.

                            CH!

                            Originally posted by CrazyHorse! View Post
                            Yesterday 12:22 PM
                            CrazyHorse! Well I pretty much abandon the idea of using it to patch the tank

                            But i just might take some advice here and pick up a few houndred pounds of it and start my own emergency mobile beer can repair service


                            But on a more serious note I may just pick some up to just fart around with it and see how it works.

                            any way here is a link to HF store where i found some

                            http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=44810

                            Hey Guys Sorry did not mean to open a can of worms here have not ever tried the product just wanted some input on it.

                            and I am pretty aware of product advertising as sometimes I refer to as (FIB-ER-Tising) that some thing that sound to good to be true are just that to good to be true.
                            I don't always read between the lines on products such as this and I am sure it has its place but like I said it is just cheaper to replace the tank with a used one which is more cost effective than repairing it.

                            although I will still pick some of this product up just to try it out and see where it may have its uses for me if at all any.

                            Thanks again
                            CH!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              CrazyHorse....heck You didn't open up anything except normal discussion IMO.
                              Don't sweat it....Good thread as far as I am concerned
                              Every one gave their honest opinion and you got some great input too.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X
                              Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.