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running a syncrowave 300 and 330

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  • running a syncrowave 300 and 330

    Myself and a friend of mine have these two models of miller welders.
    They both have water cooled heads with miller coolers.
    We have had some experiance with tig work in the past at our jobsites, where we are partners, mostly doing stainless.
    I have been studying this site for the past week and have been printing out a lot of articles for each of us to become familiar with what all we can do with our machines.
    I'm not positive what all options his machine has, I know it has a frequency dial, my 300 has a en/ep balance control along with a pulser and the frequency dial.
    We would mainly be doing work on material under 1/4", so it appears as though we wouldn't be using anything over 3/32 tunsten.
    We both have migs with spool guns for the bigger stuff.
    Neither of us have ever used the newer cerium tungsten or the gas nozzles, but it looks as though this might be the way to go but before buying a good selection of consumables, I thought I would ask you guys first.
    We both realize that these machines will probably not do everything that the newer units will do, but can cope with that.
    I have a large amount of filler rod in several types and am still researching what all I have.
    Some of these rods are before they started stamping the rods and so I might never know what all I have.
    Most of the rod is stainless, nickel based, titanium, and aluminum which is tagged so I have them covered.
    Several sleeves appear to be mild steel like er70s, some have the appearance of stainless, but these rods are swirled like a barber pole.
    Does that ring a bell with anyone?
    Thanks in advance for any and all advice, I will take notes.

  • #2
    I'd first recommend you hit the service tabs and download the manuals for the individual welders.

    Miller has used the same model number sometimes for decades, but there are significant differences/upgrades etc over the years. When you search for the manual, make sure you input the serial number of the welder to be sure you get the right manual - if you don't, you get the latest manual for a device with the same name.

    As for frequency. The transformer based welders, when in AC mode, run at line frequency. 60Hz unless you live on the other side of the pond(s). So that knob is most likely for the pulser - how many time a second the machine goes full power vs. background power. Turn the frequency down to something like .5Hz and set the background to 50% and you will definitely notice a slow pulse back and forth from full power to half. Two reasons I know for pulse are 1) Keeps you from pulsing with the pedal - much more consistent 2) Higher frequency pulse is supposed agitate aluminum puddles a bit. I would leave pulse turned off initially - something to play with.

    I would scrutinize the documentation around the pulser in the user's manual.

    One thing, not sure if the 330 is a Synchrowave. If my Miller history is correct, the Synchowaves were always square wave machines. I believe the 330 is a sine wave machine. Check some of the literature about welding aluminum and notice the discussion about balance control. Sinewave machines generally don't have balance controls. I have the Dialarc which is a step down from the old 330 in capability and features but is also a sine wave machine. In my personal opinion sine wave machines are much harder to weld aluminum with. I know there are some pros around that can do amazings stuff with a ground clamp, electrode, and by rubbing their shoes on staticy carpet - I'm not one of them.
    If its not a square wave machine, you should consider using pure tungsten, and balling the end slightly when welding aluminum. You can use ceriated with a sharpened point, but you need to go bigger in diameter - costing some arc control etc.
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    • #3
      Swirled like a barber's pole. Try to bend it , if it snaps it could be stellite. A very hard hard-facing rod.
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      • #4
        pulser control and swirled rod

        The rods that I have that have swirls are not brittle.
        They can be bent without breaking, the ones that look like er70s weld simular but leave a copper, brass type material, I haven't tried the ones that look like stainless yet.
        I will see if the 330 might be a sine wave, we both have manuals but mine for the 300 isn't very imformative outside of listing the controls and some info on what they do.
        My 300 also has pre and post flow controls for the gas.
        When I first used the machine, doing some stick welding, the light never lit up so I presumed it was burnt out.
        I did some dc welding on the tig side, same outcome with the light, but sometimes the arc would get so bright, it would blind me through my lense and sometimes the high frequency would not arc to the part being welded and I would have to scratch start the arc.
        I tried some aluminum welding a couple of weeks ago, same results with the bright arc and the high frequency and also it would weld good and then other times it seemed to be shorting out and the aluminum would not puddle or accept the filler rod, but I noticed the power light flickering.
        I called miller and they suggested taking the covers off.
        After several hours of cleaning, which was possibly it's first since there was close to 1/4" of dirt covering every internal part , the light now stays on when turned on.
        I replaced the power cord which had cracks in the lines, and dismantled all of the connections, and rebuilt the main switch panel for the ac/dc, high and low, and polarity which also was very dirty and had several arc marks on the plates.
        I'm rebuilding the cooler now, it should be finished tomorrow, and I'll be ready to try again.
        The frequency knob I am describing on both welders is located behind the panel at the bottom of the machine where the high frequency points are located and it is adjustable from 10 to 100.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dt38k View Post
          The rods that I have that have swirls are not brittle.
          They can be bent without breaking, the ones that look like er70s weld simular but leave a copper, brass type material, I haven't tried the ones that look like stainless yet.
          I will see if the 330 might be a sine wave, we both have manuals but mine for the 300 isn't very imformative outside of listing the controls and some info on what they do.
          My 300 also has pre and post flow controls for the gas.
          When I first used the machine, doing some stick welding, the light never lit up so I presumed it was burnt out.
          I did some dc welding on the tig side, same outcome with the light, but sometimes the arc would get so bright, it would blind me through my lense and sometimes the high frequency would not arc to the part being welded and I would have to scratch start the arc.
          I tried some aluminum welding a couple of weeks ago, same results with the bright arc and the high frequency and also it would weld good and then other times it seemed to be shorting out and the aluminum would not puddle or accept the filler rod, but I noticed the power light flickering.
          I called miller and they suggested taking the covers off.
          After several hours of cleaning, which was possibly it's first since there was close to 1/4" of dirt covering every internal part , the light now stays on when turned on.
          I replaced the power cord which had cracks in the lines, and dismantled all of the connections, and rebuilt the main switch panel for the ac/dc, high and low, and polarity which also was very dirty and had several arc marks on the plates.
          I'm rebuilding the cooler now, it should be finished tomorrow, and I'll be ready to try again.
          The frequency knob I am describing on both welders is located behind the panel at the bottom of the machine where the high frequency points are located and it is adjustable from 10 to 100.
          Your mystery rods are probable silicon bronze.

          HTH
          Griff

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          • #6
            As in a 330A/BP?

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