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Too Much Shielding Gas, Not Enough?

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  • Too Much Shielding Gas, Not Enough?

    How can you tell if you have too much or not enough?

    I use 100% Argon with my Syncrowave 200. I follow Millers Tig Welding Calculator but I often wonder if I'm using too much or not enough.
    Just looking for some clarity on this subject.

    Thank You
    sigpic

  • #2
    I'm pretty sure the folks at Miller have worked out the Shielding gas coverage

    What makes you think you have too much or too little?

    Bad welds?
    Ed Conley
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Broccoli1 View Post
      I'm pretty sure the folks at Miller have worked out the Shielding gas coverage

      What makes you think you have too much or too little?

      Bad welds?
      I'm sure Miller does but I've read so many threads here where some are using different cfh settings on the same alloys it's just got me curious on how can you visibly tell if you have too much or not enough. This is merely to gain some understanding on shielding gas.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        too much gas - bubble holes in the welds
        not enough - well lets say, just not good

        turn the gas down until you see it go bad the turn it up until you get bubbles.
        then you will know what is to much and not enough.

        use just enough gas to get a good clean weld, gas ain't that cheap.
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        • #5
          Originally posted by proorange View Post
          ......I've read so many threads here where some are using different cfh settings on the same alloys.........
          The threads I've read that describe extreme differences in shielding gas flow rates have dealt with the use of gas lenses vs standard collets and nozzles. You didn't say what you're using on your torch(es), so I can't venture an opinion. However, the threads I'm referring to are clear about their application to gas lenses. If you use gas lenses, look up and consider those recommendations for reduced flow, if not, use Miller's suggested settings for standard nozzles.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by 1havnfun View Post
            too much gas - bubble holes in the welds
            not enough - well lets say, just not good

            turn the gas down until you see it go bad the turn it up until you get bubbles.
            then you will know what is to much and not enough.

            use just enough gas to get a good clean weld, gas ain't that cheap.

            I like this. So simple yet great information to use with any metal while learning exactly what your set up will require.

            You've probably already seen this also but it never hurts to put it back out here. The first section is on gas coverage.

            http://www.millerwelds.com/resources...-guide-graphic

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            • #7
              Thanks guys, just adding another piece to the puzzle
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Sheilding gas depends on several things, I am using a gas lens, #4 to #6 cup size, 8 cfm to 12 cfm on the flowmeter @ 50 amps or less on steel. If youre in a drafty area it may require more cfm, if the cup size is large it will a higher cfm etc.
                I use the lowest setting that still produces a good weld, and use the gas lens exclusively. The standard collet body will require more gas flow in my experience.
                too much flow isnt good either as it will produce turbulence, and gas is expensive, as stated above.
                It is a bit of trial and error to get the right setting.
                I havent checked out the Miller guide, but I am sure it is good advise as well.
                mike sr

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