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Hobart 140 vs miller 140

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  • Hobart 140 vs miller 140

    I've been lookin at the 140 miller and that's what machine I want I was just wondering what's the diffrence between the Hobart and the miller as far as the price diffrence I was just wondering what extra are u paying for buying the miller for what I pay for the Hobart I could buy the spool gun and the machine. For the price I could just buy the miller Just curious thanks

  • #2
    I don't have apples-to-apples experience with both machines, but I'll point out that both companies have the same corporate owner. However, the machines are manufactured in different plants. You'll see some Miller parts on the Hobart.

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    • #3
      Hobarts usually have tapped voltage settings and Millers usually have infinite controls.

      -Dan

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      • #4
        Originally posted by engnerdan View Post
        Hobarts usually have tapped voltage settings and Millers usually have infinite controls.

        -Dan
        what is the diffrence between the two what diffrence does it make i dont know much about the machines

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Too View Post
          what is the diffrence between the two what diffrence does it make i dont know much about the machines
          Tapped selectors give you a handful of fixed outputs
          that you can select. It's either on number 1 (say 20v) or
          number 2 (say 18v). You can't get "Number 1.5" if you want, say,
          19v (btw, I'm just making up these numbers - I don't know what
          the HH's numbers are). The infinitely variable control lets you
          set it at any point (continuing my example, you could set the
          knob half way between 1 and 2 to get 19v, or 3/4 the way to
          get 19.5 or ...).

          Another way to think of it is like a car radio. If you JUST had
          the selector buttons, you could just pick the 4 or 5 or 6
          stations that are programmed in, you could not select anything
          else. But with the tuning knob, you can select any frequency on
          the radio you want.

          Some people say that you need infinitely variable
          selection to get the exact settings you want. Others
          say that the settings on their HH get them close enough
          that the extra variabilty doesn't really buy much.
          I have no opinion on this argument...

          Enough of that...

          The other big difference between Hobart and Miller is that
          Miller is generally believed to be targeting their machines
          to the industrial/commercial market, while Hobart's are
          more aimed for lighter duty. If that's true, then the Hobart
          machines are likely to have somewhat less-studly parts
          here and there. I don't know that these are truths or not,
          but it is a sort of prevailing opinion (or maybe those of us
          who bought miller machines hope it's true 'cuz if it isn't,
          we paid more for nothing

          When I tool some welding courses at adult-ed a few years ago,
          we had both mm140 and hh140 machines. By day, the school
          taught votech highschool welding. The school kids were not, shall
          we say, overly respectful in their care of the machines. The teacher
          said that both machines seemed to get broken at about the
          same rate; that is, he saw no significant difference in how well the
          machines stood up to the kids' misuse.

          I expect that you'd be happy with either one.

          frank

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          • #6
            I personally would go with the Miller in this case if it were me buying the machine. I have used both Hobart and Miller 140's and I like the Miller better. You can fine tune your settings on the Miller better than the Hobart. My brother owns a Hobart 140 which is a good little machine, It came with a Miller gun when he bought it.

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            • #7
              Well there is 2 ways of looking at these machines. Both machines naturally do the same thing, the Hobart is less expensive, and somewhat weaker in design.

              You will have much more control, and have a much better learing curve on the Miller than trying to fiddle with the wire speed on the Hobart.

              Say if you ran into some financial difficultys and had to sell off your machine, the Hobart is pretty much worth significantly less than the comparible Miller which still retains a depreciated value.
              Last edited by cruizer; 12-03-2009, 02:48 PM.

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              • #8
                For what it's worth, I've been completely happy with my Hobart Handler 140. I don't know how they hold their value in all parts of the country, but I've seen several sell used on ebay for more than I paid for mine new. Hobart, Lincoln and Miller are all going to hold their value much better than most tools.

                I recently got a Millermatic 211, so I could also run 220v. It's not the same as the 240, but it's a solid machine.

                I don't think you're going to see a dramatic difference between these two entry level machines.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Jack Olsen View Post
                  For what it's worth, I've been completely happy with my Hobart Handler 140. I don't know how they hold their value in all parts of the country, but I've seen several sell used on ebay for more than I paid for mine new. Hobart, Lincoln and Miller are all going to hold their value much better than most tools.

                  I recently got a Millermatic 211, so I could also run 220v. It's not the same as the 240, but it's a solid machine.

                  I don't think you're going to see a dramatic difference between these two entry level machines.
                  i looked at that do u think the 211 is a better choice as far as the money how much more of a option does it give u what im asking is do u think it would be worth while to go ahead and spend the extra 400 dollars in the long run

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                  • #10
                    The 211 is great. But it's about triple the price of the Hobart 140, which makes the Hobart a great value (while the Miller is just a great welder).

                    It depends on what you're going to be welding. I bought the 211, but I still haven't come up with a job where I need the extra power. You've got to be pretty hard core to be making anything out of 3/8" to 1/2" steel.

                    My first project was a fence for my front yard. The Hobart was great in the shop, and then it was easy to take it out to the perimeter of the yard to put the sections together. The Miller 211 would have done the job just as well, but having a 220-only machine would have been useless for the outside stuff (without a very long and expensive extension cord).

                    Last edited by Jack Olsen; 12-03-2009, 09:05 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Looks good did u buy the pieces and put them all together or start from scratch

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cruizer View Post

                        You will have much more control, and have a much better learing curve on the Miller than trying to fiddle with the wire speed on the Hobart.
                        It is actually the opposite:
                        Tapped Voltage- Select Tap and adjust wire speed- so there is really only the wire speed to fiddle with.

                        Continuous Voltage Select a "Spot" anywhere in the Range and select a wire speed- now you have to fiddle with where the Voltage needs to be AND where the Wire Speed needs to be.


                        To prove my Point is the addition of the Auto Set to the MM140 MM180 MM211.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Too View Post
                          i looked at that do u think the 211 is a better choice as far as the money how much more of a option does it give u what im asking is do u think it would be worth while to go ahead and spend the extra 400 dollars in the long run
                          Yes and No
                          Yes...
                          A 240v machine is by far a greater value- twice the tool for about a 1/3rd more in $
                          MM140=680.00 120v only
                          MM180=805.00 240v only
                          MM211= 970.00 but does have dual Voltage 120v & 240v a bonus

                          No... if ya don't have the money ya don't have the money

                          The Hobart Handlers are proven solid machines but the same rule applies-
                          HH140=479.00 120v only
                          HH187=669.00 240v only
                          HH210=829.00 240v only

                          So if you can go with a 240v machine more bang fer yer $$

                          Northern has the HH210 WITH Spool Gun for 879.00 free shipping !!!!!

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                          • #14
                            Too,
                            The Autoset feature on the Miller 140AS has been mentioned but not explained. Especially if you are new to welding, the Autoset makes it easy to get started, making pretty good welds right away. The welder comes with a metal gauge. You measure the thickness of the steel you want to weld, set the dial to that thickness, and start welding. On the MM140 the autoset is for .023 and .030 wire. If you go with the Miller 211AS, it works with .030 and .035 wire.

                            I had a MM140AS for about 2 years. I sold it (very quickly) for close to what I had in it and bought a MM211AS. Like Jack said, I may not be welding 1/2" steel, but I like having the 220v option. Basically, you can think of the MM211AS as a MM140AS plus a MM180AS. The multi-voltage option gives you the power and the flexibility you may need in the future. If money is not a problem, look at the MM211AS. Plus it is spoolgun ready.

                            If you are still deciding between the HH140 and the MM140AS, I think it is worth the money to get the Miller. I think any of these welders will do a great job and you will soon be welding.

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