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cleaning aluminum filler rod necessary?

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  • #16
    Sooo.... Whats your advice???? What am i doing wrong? Or is that a trade secret?

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    • #17
      I used to weld fuel cells for racing boats and had to get certified for it. They made us clean the filler with acetone and cut the end of the filler off before every start.

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      • #18
        I'm cleaning every thing with laquer thinner. (has acetone in it. Leaves no residue.)

        I may have to much leading angle. The effect looked like arc blow. Hot gas would slightly melt and oxidize the filler and also allow arc wander towards the filler.

        THE BEST TIP ON THIS THREAD WAS TO "SNEAK THE FILLER INTO THE VERY EDGE OF THE PUDDLE.
        Kudos to who ever posted it.
        Last edited by coronan; 04-11-2013, 10:20 AM.

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        • #19
          scotch brite yer rod

          Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
          scotchbrite, you can omit the acetone.
          +1 ...I don't like using acetone or other fast evaporating liquids for cleaning because of fire danger.....But then I welded on aluminum gillnetters ....Manual cleaning always works.....sometimes it takes more that one or two attempts...Cleaning your rod is a basic..If you have greasy gloves you may have to clean your rod often if you want those welds that shine on and on..good luck...

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          • #20
            Try to shorten the arc by holding the tung closer to the puddle; suspect you are melting/balling the rod before it hits the puddle, as others have said. Keep the tip close to the puddle and back up a bit (but don't pull away), as you dip the rod to the puddle. By keeping a shorter arc the heat is more confined to the area, so hopefully, the rod will hit the puddle before melting.

            Suggest you watch some of the videos at http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/ to see how a pro does it.
            Last edited by Goodhand; 04-14-2013, 10:25 PM.

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            • #21
              http://www.sancoclean.com/catalog/ca...no=01010100-GL

              I like this for cleaning alum not to harsh. I mixed up some in a gal bucket and dropped a spool of alum mig wire that was real old in it for a couple of minutes rinsed it of blew it out and let it dry welded like it was brand new I don't know why it wouldn't clean your filler rod a gal will last you a long time and it beats wire brushing or sanding. I buy it at a local cleaning supply.

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              • #22
                I bumped up to a 3/4 " cup and I think it solved all of my Woes.
                Acording to the miller Tig Calculator I should use 1/2 to 3/4 cup on 1/4" butt welds.

                I had 5/8 cup but couldnt run a bead larger than a pea with out contamination.

                When in doubt go up a cup size.

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