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Welding forklift forks?

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  • #61
    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
    Used forks are not any better.
    Very true! Who knows how much abuse a set of used forks have been dealt in their life span.
    Caution!
    These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

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    • #62
      Coal is likely the sole operator, likely no one standing under this load, even in the event of failure the odds of injury are probably less than driving down the road to get there in the first place. There is a certain amount of inherent risk in anything, you try to keep it to a minimum. Biggest risk is likely damage to other equipment. Likely the cycle life will be low here and odds about 50/50 or better that a repair would bend before catastrophic failure.
      Same people that worry about this are likely to think nothing about getting on a motorcycle where if it was invented today wouldn't be legal by any modern safety standards, no way, no how. Neither would a cigarette, can of beer or even soda pop or a MacDonald's burger.

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      • #63
        I wouldnt trust a set of forks at full load unless magna flux or some other testing had been performed especially used.

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        • #64
          Originally posted by Sberry View Post
          Coal is likely the sole operator, likely no one standing under this load, even in the event of failure the odds of injury are probably less than driving down the road to get there in the first place. There is a certain amount of inherent risk in anything, you try to keep it to a minimum. Biggest risk is likely damage to other equipment. Likely the cycle life will be low here and odds about 50/50 or better that a repair would bend before catastrophic failure.
          Same people that worry about this are likely to think nothing about getting on a motorcycle where if it was invented today wouldn't be legal by any modern safety standards, no way, no how. Neither would a cigarette, can of beer or even soda pop or a MacDonald's burger.
          yep its pretty bad when they have to put a warning label on a pop bottle.
          This is an automotive discussion forum that has some great infromation

          www.autobodytoolmart.com/shoptalk

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          • #65
            bevel the heck out of the steel and weld it with some 10018.

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            • #66
              Man what a thread,i have welded may forks broken like the ones in the pic,only bigger wider and thicker for my brothers in the sawmill business,and when they break them there prying around in a log pile,if it is V-ed 50% both sides and welded with 7018 it woln't break in the weld it will break some where else,there has been many times i have cut the top of good used forks off for them and made new tubing for the tops of the forks and they were welded on with 7018 still working after many years..but it's a chance you take. Those forks are light i would replace them.
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              • #67
                Originally posted by Coalsmoke View Post
                JS, good to hear from you, that's a handy device with the D ring, I will have to keep that in mind. I hope these lean times are being ok to you.

                I ordered some 2x6" HSS, .375" wall and plan to build myself a new set of forks next week or so, but will weld these up with preheat as suggested and use them gingerly until then to at least get me through the next couple of orders this week, then I'll have a little breathing room. I figure it will work for my needs.
                Coal, sorry I missed this one.

                I made this slip-on thing, for one customer, ummm,,, military classified (not the D-ring, but why I made it). It was never charged out, so it remained ours. Current customer had a field-lift, with holes in the forks, but the mast goes high enough above the carriage, that I was worried about hitting some pressurized ammonia refrigeration lines, above. This little slip-on, allowed me to go just high enough to do the job, with warehouse forklifts, without worrying about the mast, breaking ammonia pipes.

                As far as these trying times, yeah, it's tough, I'm still just muddling my way on thru. My wife's not worried, though, she's in the middle of a North Sea cruise, $$$$ ...... I'm just hoping, I have enough money left, to be able to buy gas, to go pick her up next week.

                She needs, a nice little vacation, away from me, anyway.

                You can't really blame her, can you?
                Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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                • #68
                  Buying forks, making forks, repairing forks. I would consider the fact, if you are picking up long sections, even if using two forks, if you get the load unbalanced, the TOTAL load may be only, or mostly, on only one fork.
                  Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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                  • #69
                    And yeah, I can now once again, enjoy bachelor life again, even if for only a few weeks. Just love, snacking on Cheez-its, in bed, at midnight.
                    Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
                      Coal, sorry I missed this one.

                      I made this slip-on thing, for one customer, ummm,,, military classified (not the D-ring, but why I made it). It was never charged out, so it remained ours. Current customer had a field-lift, with holes in the forks, but the mast goes high enough above the carriage, that I was worried about hitting some pressurized ammonia refrigeration lines, above. This little slip-on, allowed me to go just high enough to do the job, with warehouse forklifts, without worrying about the mast, breaking ammonia pipes.

                      As far as these trying times, yeah, it's tough, I'm still just muddling my way on thru. My wife's not worried, though, she's in the middle of a North Sea cruise, $$$$ ...... I'm just hoping, I have enough money left, to be able to buy gas, to go pick her up next week.

                      She needs, a nice little vacation, away from me, anyway.

                      You can't really blame her, can you?
                      Good to hear that your wife is giving you some time off. If you didn't have the money to go pick her up, it would be rather fitting,... of course once she did get home I suspect there would be a lot of TV dinners in your future. Just speculating of course.

                      Originally posted by JSFAB View Post
                      And yeah, I can now once again, enjoy bachelor life again, even if for only a few weeks. Just love, snacking on Cheez-its, in bed, at midnight.
                      Haha


                      I torched off the old fork sections, I think I might use them for a 3 pt hitch pallet carrier. Anyways, I made a stronger pair, 48" again as I figured any less would be a bit of a handicap, and welded them onto the old framework. I was thinking along the same lines as you about the load not being balanced. I think they will suffice for my needs, but I guess time will be the better indicator.
                      Attached Files
                      Coalsmoke's Website

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                      • #71
                        Those look good, Coal. Personally, I don't care for tubing forks, but it looks like what you built, is at least heavy enough to handle, anything that tractor can handle.
                        Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Coal, DON'T scrap out the old forks, I have bought and cut, modified, quite a few over the years. Sometimes we need the back piece, for hanging specialized equipment, sometimes we need the forks themselves, for attaching to other stuff. A couple times, just bought forks, for the little attachment point on top, that slides back and forth, air-arc them off, weld them on something else.

                          Understand, anything I bought to do a job, was fully charged out for that job. Any leftovers, then, basically become pure profit.
                          Obviously, I'm just a hack-artist, you shouldn't be listening to anything I say .....

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                          • #73
                            I put the stock forks I cut off in storage for now. This winter I think I'll use them to make a 3 point hitch set of forks for putting a firewood / carry-all bin on the back of the tractor. My next immediate project is to make a 1000lb counterweight for the tractor. It gets a little light in the rear with any more than 2500lbs of log on the forks. With winter coming I imagine I'll need some traction help soon, might even need some chains for it in the snow, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it due to the high price of tractor tire chains.
                            Coalsmoke's Website

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                            • #74
                              Originally posted by Coalsmoke View Post
                              With winter coming I imagine I'll need some traction help soon, might even need some chains for it in the snow, but I'll cross that bridge when I get to it due to the high price of tractor tire chains.
                              Just start buying used truck chains at yard sales, flea markets, Craig’s list, and make your own. Not like you’re taking your tractor to a show, or doing highway speeds.
                              Lap weld the links with 3/32” SMAW 309 or 312 stainless, save you lots of money!
                              Caution!
                              These are "my" views based only on “my” experiences in “my” little bitty world.

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Unfortunately chains up here are pricey, regardless of what they are supposed to fit. I'll keep my eye's open at the auctions for some though.
                                Coalsmoke's Website

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