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Dynasty Processes-Set Up

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  • Miller Already Has It.

    Originally posted by Bob Miller View Post
    Andy, If there is not going to be a Dynasty 200 book in the near future, how about a Cheat Sheet/Quick Reference Guide.
    You know something that says what all the buttons do, and how to get into the hidden menu and stuff like that.
    I was thinking of doing something like that and laminate it, so you can store it under the welder.
    But it would be better if you did it.
    Good Luck,
    Bob
    Miller already has a Quick Reference, Part#248988.
    All this time and all I had to do was look.
    Good Luck,
    Bob

    Comment


    • The output waveforms of conventional generators are pure sine wave. Inverter generators might be different in waveform. Not a good idea to run an inverter welder off an inverter power supply since power factor rating on the welder is based on pure sine.

      Most generators sold in stores are 2-pole rotors and run at 3600 RPM. But most important is the excitation of the rotor is through brushes and slip rings. If the slip rings arc, this can make an output spike. Rotor current is regulated for control of output and is proportional to output current so they are most likely to arc under higher loads. If driving a motor or resistance load, damage isn't likely. Inverter welders? Don't chance it.

      Better generators run 4-pole rotors and run at 1800 RPM. Even better are those which use brushless excitation. That is the kind I have experience with running my 200DX. Mine is a military surplus MEP-002A, rated for 5 kW but capable of 9 kW before frequency drops as it has a 70 cubic inch Onan diesel. 52 amps at 120 VAC, 26 amps 240 and 17.3 amps in 208 3-phase. Since the Dynasty can use it, I run in that mode.

      I've run it at 200 amps SMAW with no problems. Yes, it responds to the load (around 8 kVA) without more than 0.50 Hz variation (unloaded, 60.5, loaded 60). During my last project, it consumed less than two gallons in 6 hours.

      Comment


      • Dynasty 200 DX hidden menu

        My first post here. I bought my Dynasty 200 DX Mar, '11 and until very recently have not used it except for a short TIG weld to verify that it worked at all. I'm now needing to use the machine for some stick welding. I'm trying to access the "hidden menu" to change the "low" OCV setting to "high" OCV setting. Thus far I have not been able to open the hidden menu at all.

        I'm following directions (I think) in the written owners manual that came with the machine. Obviously I'm doing something wrong as the menu remains hidden. Great name for it by the way............

        Any suggestions? It's probably worth mentioning that I'm very "old school" so most anything made after transformers and tubes is rather challenging to me! Heck, anything that involves the flow of electrons is a challenge!!

        I did try a search for "hidden menu" on this forum but it came up with nothing....

        Thanks in advance, Dave

        Comment


        • Hidden menu?

          Originally posted by H80N View Post
          I have been lobbying for that book for years.... think we will be waiting.... for a while longer

          But for beginners on these machines there is a setup video that Miller posted on Youtube.... it covers the basics pretty well... and is free....

          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I73S7fBStsY
          This is a very helpful video for a Dynasty newbie such as myself. Thanks for giving the link. I'm still trying to find out how to access the (well) hidden menu..

          Thanks again, Dave

          Comment


          • Part way there now another question

            Thanks to the short (4+ min) Miller Dynasty menu setup video I got the hidden menu mastered. Stick welding with normal OCV is just like welding with my old Miller Syncrowave 300. So what is the reason for the low OCV setting? Less current draw by the machine? And if normal OCV is selected is there any further advantage to using the DIG setting?

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Dave G View Post
              Thanks to the short (4+ min) Miller Dynasty menu setup video I got the hidden menu mastered. Stick welding with normal OCV is just like welding with my old Miller Syncrowave 300. So what is the reason for the low OCV setting? Less current draw by the machine? And if normal OCV is selected is there any further advantage to using the DIG setting?
              Low OCV is safer since the voltage is always there unless you have a remote contactor. It does nothing to the machine's current draw.

              DIG has nothing to do with this, it is simply voltage droop control. SMAW is constant current, power (current x voltage) varies with arc length.

              Comment


              • HF start not working, low amps, no error codes

                Been having trouble with my older Dynasty 300 DX (serial #KK032499)
                I pretty much exclusively use this for 1/8" aluminum, and for years it has been fine.

                Built a steel hydraulic press, and used the Dynasty for stick welding. Ever since, it's been hard to start in HF AC TIG.
                This weekend I tried to use it on 1/4 aluminum, and HF wouldn't work at all I switched to liftarc, and even though the amps were turned up to 300, it wouldn't even form a puddle.

                Turned down the amps and tried it on 1/8", and still no HF start, but it would weld a nice bead using liftarc.

                It doesn't show any error codes, but I noticed that while welding, the amps meter shows 500... weird.

                Welding parameters are:
                When the machine is turned on, the left panel reads, 19.6, and the right panel reads 597, then changes to -.6 on the left panel, then displays set amps.
                When welding, the left panel reads volts (varies all over the place in the 20v range) and the right panel always reads 500
                Water cooled torch
                Red tungsten (3/32", tried gold too)
                #5 cup with gas lens
                20 CFH Argon
                pre flow .8
                post flow 4.0
                AC TIG
                HF mode
                frequency 60
                AC balance 75%
                Amps 140 for 1/8"
                remote enabled

                I have accessed the hidden menus and see:
                The arc time is 741 hrs, 49 minutes
                The arc cycles are 211,946
                The lockout is disabled
                The HF start amps is 30
                The HF time is 20

                One thing though, when accessing/setting HF amps and start time, the left display shows SE.L instead of -5- like shown in the manual.

                I'm using this manual: http://www.millerwelds.com/om/o358b_mil.pdf

                It seems like there is a setting that is not right. Is there a reboot or factory preset that I can access?

                Thanks for any help!
                Last edited by acidrain; 04-29-2012, 07:58 PM.

                Comment


                • Nevermind, it's toast.
                  I called Miller and talked to a tech today (nice guy).
                  There is no reset for this machine.
                  I'm sending it off for diagnosis. I'll post results when I have them.

                  Comment


                  • Diagnosis results

                    They found two open buss resistors on PC-2. Replaced those and ran a operational/load test... same results.
                    They recommend replacement of the PC-1 control board, PC-8 clamp board, and pc-7 HF board.
                    Estimate for the work is $3,467 including local sales tax. Yikes!

                    I can find the parts (genuine, new Miller parts) on line for less than $2K.
                    I'm not inept. I understand the dangers of capacitors, etc.
                    It would be a big gamble, but what do you guys think? Is this something I can do myself?

                    As a side note, to finish the jobs I had in the door, I rented a 200 DX. I must say, I'm very impressed with the power. I didn't expect to weld 1/4" aluminum with a welder that only weighs 45 lbs.
                    My LWS has a brand new, two year warranty 200 DX for $3200.

                    So My options are: new 200DX, or fix my old 300DX (new 350DX is not an option).
                    Opinions?

                    Comment


                    • That quote is ridiculous ,Did they offer any explanation as to why 3 boards failed at once? You can do a google search there are a lot of companies that do component level repairs on PCB boards and warranty their work. Just an idea Mike

                      Comment


                      • That quote is ridiculous ,Did they offer any explanation as to why 3 boards failed at once? You can do a google search there are a lot of companies that do component level repairs on PCB boards and warranty their work. Just an idea Mike

                        Comment


                        • Meh, moot point now... bought a brand new 200 DX. Hard to beat a 3 yr warranty and free loaner. It doesn't have the power of the 300, but some of the new features are cool (waveshape), and it does almost everything my old unit could do.
                          The repairs were just to big of a gamble for me. Thanks for the input guys.

                          Comment


                          • Dyn 350 Aluminum Engine Block...

                            Here are a few more neat videos that illustrate some of the advantages and setup of the Dynasty 350... Aluminum Engine Block Welding...
                            these are with Chris Razor of Hi-Tech Welding

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUr2h...feature=relmfu

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9aqMknf_0g

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oh5n9...feature=relmfu

                            Comment


                            • New to the Thread - Dynasty Setup for Mild Steel

                              Hello everyone, new to the party, maybe someone has already addressed the issue I'm battling, but I can weld stainless or aluminum easily with my Dynasty 350, for the first time I tried to use it on some plain old angle iron to fix a bracket the other day and spent 3 hrs just trying to get some penetration. The steel becomes hot, glowing red, but doesn't let any penetration happen, tried a little filler rod to see what it would do and it lays right on the surface. Cranked up the DC amps well above 200 and still same results, tried some different settings on the pulse/wave controls same results. Is this an alloy, wrong settings, or did I not clean the area well enough? I'll try and get some pics if I can, thanks!

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Cowboyz Custom View Post
                                Hello everyone, new to the party, maybe someone has already addressed the issue I'm battling, but I can weld stainless or aluminum easily with my Dynasty 350, for the first time I tried to use it on some plain old angle iron to fix a bracket the other day and spent 3 hrs just trying to get some penetration. The steel becomes hot, glowing red, but doesn't let any penetration happen, tried a little filler rod to see what it would do and it lays right on the surface. Cranked up the DC amps well above 200 and still same results, tried some different settings on the pulse/wave controls same results. Is this an alloy, wrong settings, or did I not clean the area well enough? I'll try and get some pics if I can, thanks!

                                Pictures would help, along with settings.....100 amps is enough to melt about anything......very strange.....looking forward to your response

                                Comment

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