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Dynasty Welding Book?

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  • #16
    A book like described above that would also include a quick reference guide.

    I would alos be interested in a hands on training seminar.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by FusionKing View Post
      John, Glad to see your reply.
      I think a book based on the Dynasty series that took into account every single function, and went into depth with the cause and effect of that functions entire range would be sufficient for starters. Then go into detail on common techiques of using each function. By doing that and diccussing the effect on material types and thicknesses, it would be quite lengthy.
      Something like..."Getting the most out of your inverter tig machine"
      I bet it would take at least a year to write.
      Then a class/seminar thing might work but it would just be nice to get something into print that could be thrown into the truck at all times or in the shop depending on where the machine was.
      The "dummy" book was great..it layed a groundwork for many. I even like it. It also proved your ability to write good concise info as well. Making it fairly clear another better more technical book would be possible.
      I believe you need to go to both big and small shops and pick brains on what people are doing with these machines as well and then mix that in with the intended purpose of the funtions.
      I have "invented" a trick or two and I'm sure there would be some others out there I could use eveyday as well.
      The newsletter thing you guys send out could be something that had newer techniques as well when you run across them. Right now everything I get like that seems to be more geared towards selling new machines IMO.
      I wouldn't be too keen on paying for a seminar only to find out it was a waste of time tho in this economy. Unless it was cheap enuff. maybe more of a forum based get together?? With Miller bringing stuff to work with??

      I think Fusionking said it best, and I could not agree more....
      Voigt Precision Welding, Inc.

      Miller Dynasty 200 DX, Miller Syncrowave 250, MillerMatic 252, Hypertherm Powermax 45, Auto Arc Trailpower 8000,272+187 lb Peter Wright anvil, 120 lb Fisher-norris, and more! Buffalo drill press, Grizzly Horiz. Bandsaw, Edwards shear, Barth Shear, bantam mechanical ironworker, Hopkins fly press, Doall Bandsaw, brown and sharpe surface grinder.

      2007 Silverado 2500HD (tow vehicle)
      2000 Camaro SS (Race car)
      sigpic

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      • #18
        What FusionKing said...
        Dynasty 200 DX runner
        Sync 350 LX
        XMT 300 w/D74 and roughnecks
        Hobart 135
        ESAB PowerCut 875 plasma

        Comment


        • #19
          I agree with Most of what Fusionking says.... with the exception of it taking a year..... Maybe..... If we think outside of the box... we could speed up the process and make it more efficient.... having the first draft posted online as a pdf... where we can all look it over, proofread, add info etc. If Miller were to assign a technical writer/editor to integrate the input and info from the engineers in Appleton and the users out in the field. there is an awful lot of experience and knowledge from the end users that will complement that of the engineering team to make it a more complete and comprehensive document.. I believe that the development time could be shortened considerably... and it would in effect become a living document... where there would be a collaberative effort of all involved...
          At the time of completion I for one would be more than happy to pay for a bound copy...

          What do you guys think?

          thanks
          Heiti
          Last edited by H80N; 06-19-2009, 09:46 PM.
          .

          *******************************************
          The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

          “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

          Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

          My Blue Stuff:
          Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
          Dynasty 200DX
          Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
          Millermatic 200

          TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

          Comment


          • #20
            I think that seminars held in conjunction with road show apperances would be nice for those who could attend. I really believe a book would be the best though, as it would be a part of my reference collection for ever. This book would be great for the end user (us) but could also be an important tool for industry and secondary education when used as a text book. Sign me up!!! JEFF
            200DX 350P 625 Plasma & other stuff I forgot

            Comment


            • #21
              John,

              Thanks for coming on the board with your comments. Shows Miller is looking for ways to help their owners advance their knowledge.

              I also agree wholeheartedly with Fusion King in that a book would be the way to go. I also like the idea of an on line "living document" that could be updated as an owner discovered a little trick "that worked for him".

              As a longtime Sync user (over 25 years) who's owned three different versions of the 250, the capabilities of the inverter machines still amazes me.

              Over the last several years I've had the opportunity to use friends Dynasty 200's and 300's, and really liked the way they performed. Mostly though, it was to "get a job done" and really had little chance to "put one thru her paces" and explore other options available. That changed recently when I purchased a Dynasty 200 DX to supplement the Sync 250 DX that I have.

              Over the last couple of weeks I've been "playing around" with different settings on the machine. I can honestly say I've barely scratched the surface on "optimizing the machine" for certain applications. I have found that having the ability to adjust the frequency is awesome for welding aluminum. Now if I could just figure out some optimal settings for doing thin gauge SS, I'd be on cloud nine.

              In a previous lifetime, I was responsible for developing techincal manuals for the military. From that experience, I can understand the difficulty you face in developing a manual detailed enough to benefit the "experienced user" while still being basic enough to be comprehended by the "newbie". With that said, I think there's currently enough "basic" information out there. What's needed is more detail and application information.

              Also, I will also add that there currently exists some confusion (different data) between several of your own (Miller) resources. In point, the Tig Handbook, on line guides, and the Tig calculator show much different values for the same applications. I know this is probably due to the differences between the transformers and inverters, but this is not always made clear.

              With all that said, I think an on line reference may be the way to go. You could start with a basic shell and add additional information as it becomes available. What I'm thinking would go something like this:

              A user finds a set of parameters that work particularly well for doing, let's say, 1/8" SS corner joints. He posts up his settings in a "try this" forum. Users have a chance to try them out and report back their results. If the reports indicate that it is a "good set of parameters" then that comment/setting becomes a part of the basic "living document". The difficulty comes in cataloging that data so that it can be easily retrieved by the interested user. That's where Miller, with their experience, comes in.

              Just something to think about. From the responses already, sounds like there are some experienced users out there who would be more than willing to help. Another problem to be addressed is that it would need to be made clear that this particular forum is NOT directed at the "what size tungsten do I use?" user. You have some very experienced users who've really "taken their machines thru the paces" (KB Fabrications for one) who don't post here much anymore because they got tired of answering basic questions that are already covered in detail in the owners manuals.

              The ball is now in Miller's court.
              Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
              Dynasty 200 DX
              Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
              Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
              Hobart HH187
              Dialarc 250 AC/DC
              Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
              Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
              PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
              Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
              Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
              More grinders than hands

              Comment


              • #22
                Personally I think this site's compilation of product training and the knowledge and opinions of the members here is pretty comprehensive, IMO the majority of what you need to know can be found here if you are willing to put in the time to look for the information.Mike

                Comment


                • #23
                  So Crawdaddy,

                  Would you care to shed some light on the effect of a high frequency pulse rate on thin gauge Stainless Steel? I've done a search and the information seems a little lacking.

                  As I said in my previous post, the suggested forum would not be for "basic information" which is available elsewhere. It would be for the advanced user who wants to achieve maximum performance from a highly advanced welding machine.

                  PS: In my book, anyone who "thinks" he's welding 1/2" aluminum "properly" at 200A, is still at the "basic" stage of development.
                  Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                  Dynasty 200 DX
                  Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                  Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                  Hobart HH187
                  Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                  Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                  Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                  PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                  Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                  Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                  More grinders than hands

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Your book doesnt mean squat to me.Who are you to critize me? Ill stop there My post regarding the 200 amp AL welding was in the format of a QUESTION that is why I asked it because I dont know.Now if maybe if you asked someone at Miller about your your freq question I bet the engineers at Miller could answer it for you, Or maybe you will just keep playing with the adjustments a few more years.Mike

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Well............
                      I for one would sure like to see a book on the subject...... which is the reason that I started this thread to begin with............
                      Tnx
                      Heiti

                      BTW.. Bickering will get us nowhere.. just waste our time...
                      .

                      *******************************************
                      The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                      “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                      Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                      My Blue Stuff:
                      Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                      Dynasty 200DX
                      Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                      Millermatic 200

                      TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        H80N,

                        Unfortunately, Crawdaddy is precisely the type user I was referring to in my previous posting. This is the same poster who asks the question, "do I use electrode postitive when welding steel?". The book/forum I think we're talking about is not for the user who doesn't even read his owner's manual or believe the data put out by the manufacturers regarding equipment capabilities. I suspect that they think some "wiseguy" just went off in the corner and pulled an answer out of their arse.

                        I've been tig welding for longer than many on this board have been around (think mid '60's and old Linde heliarc equipment) and every day I learn something new. The feeling I got, moving from the old sine wave equipment to the squarewave machines (WOW!), is the same feeling I now get in exploring the capabilities of the inverters.

                        The first thing I did when my new 200 arrived was sit down and read the owners manual from cover to cover. Couple of sections I had to read twice to fully comprehend. Covers a lot of detail with regards to how to set the machine up for a particular task, but is sorely lacking in explaining the WHY.

                        I think that's what a lot of users are looking for.
                        Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                        Dynasty 200 DX
                        Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                        Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                        Hobart HH187
                        Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                        Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                        Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                        PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                        Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                        Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                        More grinders than hands

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I'll take one of those books. I'm pretty sureI fall into the experianced tig welder category but the Dynasty has so many capabilities it's a bit overwhelming. These things do most anything great at the factory default settings but I have already seen that these things are simply amazing when you play with the adjustments.I just finished a set of stainless mufflers and was amazed at the slick welds I achieved using the pulse.
                          Dynasty 200DX "Blue Lightning"
                          Bernard 3500ss water-cooler
                          Rockwell vertical mill
                          Beverly Shear B-3
                          Beverly Shear JR
                          Home-made English wheel
                          Milwaukee Porta-band
                          " Sawz-all
                          Tennsmith 36" stomp shear
                          Fixer upper 1968 Redface Lincoln sa200
                          Powcon 300st

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Heck,

                            I don't need no frigging book.

                            I didn't even read the owner's manual.

                            If I've got a question, I'll just ask it on the INTERNET.



                            Sound familar?
                            Syncrowave 250 DX Tigrunner
                            Dynasty 200 DX
                            Miller XMT 304 w/714D Feeder & Optima Control
                            Miller MM 251 w/Q300 & 30A SG
                            Hobart HH187
                            Dialarc 250 AC/DC
                            Hypertherm PM 600 & 1250
                            Wilton 7"x12" bandsaw
                            PC Dry Cut Saw, Dewalt Chop Saw
                            Milwaukee 8" Metal Cut Saw, Milwaukee Portaband.
                            Thermco and Smith (2) Gas Mixers
                            More grinders than hands

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Blah.Blah,Blah,Blah

                              Would you like some cheese with your Whine?Mike

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                The great thing about this forum and the American way is that there is a great diversity of style and opinion.... while not always harmonious... it is part of what helps to make up the incredible knowledge base here....
                                and while some of us have the time and inclination to mine past posts for the information wanted.... others of us would prefer to have a hard copy on paper...
                                tnx
                                Heiti
                                .

                                *******************************************
                                The more you know, The better you know, How little you know

                                “The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten”

                                Buy the best tools you can afford.. Learn to use them to the best of your ability.. and take care of them...

                                My Blue Stuff:
                                Dynasty 350DX Tigrunner
                                Dynasty 200DX
                                Millermatic 350P w/25ft Alumapro & 30A
                                Millermatic 200

                                TONS of Non-Blue Equip, plus CNC Mill, Lathes & a Plasmacam w/ PowerMax-1000

                                Comment

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