Miller Electric

Welding Discussion Forums

Home » Resources » Communities » Welding Discussion Forums

The forum is currently undergoing maintenance and is in a 'read-only' mode for the time being. Sorry for the inconvenience.


  • If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Alum. Results, Comments Please...

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • New Alum. Results, Comments Please...

    Hello everyone,

    I previously posted some basic questions and pics, as I am learning to tig alum. (I should say "TIG weld period" for that matter, as I have never done it before). In any event, I took everyones advice from before and tried my best to follow. The most significant thing I noticed was how the bead shape changes as the part gets hot. I can see now why preheating is suggested for larger parts. It seams as the part gets hotter the bead gets a little wider and not as tall, (I'm guessing better penetration at this point). You can see this in one of the photos. I'm guessing letting off the heat a little to keep the bead even is the solution there?? Another thing I noticed was the affect of the aluminum melting under the oxide layer, forming what looks like a bubble. I only had this happen when tacking the parts together. This makes it basically impossible to fuse the two parts, (stop and reclean). It would also apear that the two puddles would repel eachother as I would try to add filler?? Let me know what you think. Thanks in advance. This is what I used this time.

    .08" 5052 Material
    1/16 2% Thoriated
    Gas Lense #8 cup (pure Argon 13 - 15 cfh)
    .06" 5356 Filler
    80 - 100 Amps / 100 - 120Hz / 20% (more than 20% really seems to take a toll on the tungsten)
    Stainless Brush and then wipe with acetone (parts and filler)
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by RCGRT View Post
    Hello everyone,
    I am learning to tig alum. (I should say "TIG weld period" for that matter, as I have never done it before).
    Uhm, where I'm from your first, second, and forth pic make you a pro.

    Comment


    • #3
      You putting us on?

      anyone could miff that hot one...youre too consistant to not have done anything like this before. Especially the same shape/consistancy/width. Thats pretty **** good.

      Comment


      • #4
        Rig Hand -
        Thanks, The 3 pics your talking about was a little 2" cube. After trying a few practice corner and fillet welds on some 1/8" 6061, I decided to try and actually make something (haha). So that was the first thing I made.

        The other pics was a holder for the foot control. Second project.
        Thanks again, still have lots to learn.

        Comment


        • #5
          Jesus I got a long way to go

          Nice job, **** nice

          Comment


          • #6
            On Fire Most of the Time -

            Haha, thats funny. No I'm not trying to fool anyone at all. Just looking for good advice from some of you pros. As far as the never done this sort of thing before, well, I have done a fair amout of flux core mig, and stick welding. I have been exposed to tig welding for years, working in a machine shop, but I never had the opportunity to actually watch and learn (like with a helmet on) When the weldor would come to touch up parts or whatever I would always watch him get everything ready, but when the actually welding started, NOPE, had to step back and let him do his thing. Other than that, I did alot of reading (a bunch on here). So far the only thing I have done with the machine is build a small kart for it (1" mild sq tubing). That was the very first thing I did. Once I had the kart done, I started practicing with aluminum. But those pics are the first thing I have put together alum. wise, other than my few practice beads on some flat 1/8" plate. I'd say I have a whole hour under my belt now! haha. Comments and suggestions would be greatly appreciatied. Thanks

            Also one thing to consider was the 1st, 2nd, and 4th picture was a littel 2" cube, so the bead was rather short, and I was able to position pretty good to finish it in one pass. The other two pics was the second alum. thing I did (a holder for the foot control) and those beads were about 6 inches long. I had to stop to reposition myself/filler. And the part got pretty hot which seems to change the weld characteristics pretty good.
            Last edited by RCGRT; 06-01-2009, 11:17 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              proorange -

              Thanks, are you learning too? If so I sure would like to see some pictures. Just curious, from one beginner to another ya know. I have never done any tig welding untill now, but I have been reading alot on here. Some of these guys seem to really know what they're doing, and are nice enough to offer good advice. Thanks again

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by RCGRT View Post
                proorange -

                Thanks, are you learning too? If so I sure would like to see some pictures. Just curious, from one beginner to another ya know. I have never done any tig welding untill now, but I have been reading alot on here. Some of these guys seem to really know what they're doing, and are nice enough to offer good advice. Thanks again
                Just started welding aluminum this weekend. Had a minor setback though Friday and Saturday. Took me almost 2 days to figure out I had some bad Argon or a bad bottle. Once I exchanged the bottle things went a little smoother.

                Comment


                • #9
                  whats the technique to get the overlaped weld look? i am just starting aluminium and cant get it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Brendan_H

                    Honestly I'm not one to answer that. At this point all I could recommend is "steady" and "consistent" movements. So far from what I can tell, uniform "movement" gives uniform results. However, there are alot of variables on the AC side, not to mention material prep that all plays a factor as well. But if I had to guess I'd say the answer to what your asking is a combination off torch movement and adding filler.

                    Check out this video, then click on his "tig welding aluminum" link, he seems to have some pretty good tips. Still learning here too.

                    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/

                    Thanks

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The stacked dime appearance comes from steady heat, steady movement, and consistant rod movement. Distance from the torch to the work piece also affects that.

                      Everything has to be clean, stainless brush, acetone, those things are essential.

                      RCGRT- I was just curious, because someone else did a little joke like that a short time ago. Those welds look good, and I wish that i was capable of practicing a little more...but I currently dont have access to a tig welder, and thus no tig welding.

                      Its been a while since Ive been able to tig aluminum, but I always enjoyed it.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        On Fire Most of the Time -

                        Yeah, as far as the appearance goes, thats pretty much what I have learned so far.

                        Oh no problem at all, Yeah I think I know what thread your talking about. Those were some very professional looking welds!

                        Thanks again

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          tigging....

                          I by no means am an expert of tig welding but can say thats what my beads looked like after about 3 hours of practice on alum. However let me say this I have been welding aluminum with a spoolgun for the last 5 years. Have been a welder for 10 years so making decent welds is not that hard.
                          If this guy has never welded before, than I would say its pretty darn good. But Mig, Stick welding has a lot of carry overs to tig welding. In both cases consistent and steady hand movement, correct voltage, proper prep, all contribute to a bettar weld. Yes with tig, the heat, and filler rod is on you but the puddle has the same fluidness. We all know what happens with to much/to litte heat in any process...
                          Kevin

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X
                          Special Offers: See the latest Miller deals and promotions.