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Flux Core vs. Mig Wire with gas

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  • Flux Core vs. Mig Wire with gas

    Is there a difference in the quality of welds other than looks between the 2 different wires? On mild steel.

  • #2
    Flux-core gives you better penatration,burns in a little deeper.But it does also make for a little more cleanup,a wire wheel on a grinder will take care of that.I like it and its all I use on my mig machine.

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    • #3
      ESAB lists 8 self shielded wire products, 8 gas shielded, and over 30 gas shielded cored wires.

      Lincoln has over 40 products in the wire type electrode.


      I am sure if you did some reading you would find an electrode rod filler for your application


      "Quality of weld" please define. What are you building???

      Kind of like asking if a quality difference exists between traveling by Porsche or freight train.


      If you have 700,000 tons of material to move 1000 miles I would not be using the Porsche. But if you are going out for a drive in the country the train might be difficult to turn.
      Last edited by FATFAB; 01-25-2009, 01:59 PM.

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      • #4
        "MIG" Wire Weldments

        Originally posted by coop View Post
        Is there a difference in the quality of welds other than looks between the 2 different wires? On mild steel.
        There's a BIG difference in application. Certain types of UltraCore, Innershield and Outershield wire is pre-qualified for AWS D 1.8 Seismic Applications, solid MIG wire is not.

        Dave
        "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
          There's a BIG difference in application. Certain types of UltraCore, Innershield and Outershield wire is pre-qualified for AWS D 1.8 Seismic Applications, solid MIG wire is not.

          Dave
          What if the OP is just fixing the kitchen chair, and not the Empire State Building? Is their a difference then?

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          • #6
            On the practical side.....For weld repairs on metal that will be painted, MIG is easier to work with than flux-core. Auto repair web sites http://www.streetrodderweb.com/tech/...ods/index.html note that after flux core welding auto body panels it is necessary to thoroughly clean the welds before grinding to remove any contaminants that may adversely affect adhesion of body filler and/or primer. Grinding the flux-core weld without thorough cleaning has the tendency to "smear" the contaminants into surrounding metal, compounding paint and filler adhesion problems.
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            • #7
              So in the end it all depends on the application when choosing a process and filler type.


              Much to be considered when asking about quality.

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              • #8
                As Dave Deragh said, I had a AWS welding inspector at a show tell me that they do not have a certified weld proceedure for solid wire with gas.
                Only for the flux core.
                I never checked into it so I'm going on heresay.

                For general welding in a shop, I and most welders run solid wire with gas.
                For welding on cars, chairs, brackets, angle frames and railings.

                A shop that primarily welds structural would be more apt to run a flux core.

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                • #9
                  Thanks everyone....All I use is solid with a 75/25 mix....just a little shop talk with some friends the other day and the subject came up,no one knew for sure but I told them I knew the place to find out.

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                  • #10
                    "Huh?"

                    Originally posted by FATFAB View Post
                    What if the OP is just fixing the kitchen chair, and not the Empire State Building? Is their a difference then?
                    Are you serious? What do you think?

                    Dave
                    "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                    • #11
                      fluc cored

                      flux cored is harder to weld with if u ask me i have a flux cored at home but i use a mig at school but then again im not the best welder and their is alot more clean up needed for flux cored. an advantage of flux cored is its cheaper no need for gas
                      serious welder lol!!!!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by coop View Post
                        Thanks everyone....All I use is solid with a 75/25 mix....just a little shop talk with some friends the other day and the subject came up,no one knew for sure but I told them I knew the place to find out.

                        Well Coop as you can see by the responses with out defining your question more no one can ever answer your question.

                        Some have talked about AWS pre qualified procedures, some have talked about clean up. Some have mentioned having difficulties with the FCAW.

                        In vary general terms: and in the hands of a skilled craftsman there is no difference between the quality of the two processes GMAW FCAW when applied appropriately.

                        The choice of one over the other could be as simple as "I have no gas so I will use FCAW" or "I don't want to mess with slag".

                        Care to elaborate on your definition of "quality of weld" some?






                        Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                        Are you serious? What do you think?

                        Dave
                        Yes I am I can and have used the same process and procedure to weld structural steel as I did ornamental steel.


                        What do you think are you still cornfused?

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                        • #13
                          I'll make it easy. Apples to apples comparing 70ksi series electrodes...

                          When properly done, flux core makes a better weld. AWS knows this and nobody knows welding better than AWS. It has less hydrogen, is more ductile, and has better fatigue properties. The ultimate tensile strength is more uniform as well because the flux removes impurities from the weld.

                          In the hands of an experienced FCAW welder, the beads are as slick as GMAW (after slag and smoke removal). A clean workpiece leaves almost no slag behind.

                          If you don't know what you are doing FCAW will pile up with slag inclusions, spatter, worm around, and generally look like chicken schitt on a wire.

                          What really scares me though is that if you don't know what you're doing with GMAW, you can still make a brittle weld with incomplete fusion and it will look great. A monkey can make good looking, brittle GMAW welds with incomplete fusion.

                          Everyone's got their opinion. I base mine on strength, ductility, and looks... not just being "so easy a caveman could do it."

                          80% of failures are from 20% of causes
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                          • #14
                            Good For You!

                            Originally posted by FATFAB View Post
                            Well Coop as you can see by the responses with out defining your question more no one can ever answer your question.

                            Some have talked about AWS pre qualified procedures, some have talked about clean up. Some have mentioned having difficulties with the FCAW.

                            In vary general terms: and in the hands of a skilled craftsman there is no difference between the quality of the two processes GMAW FCAW when applied appropriately.

                            The choice of one over the other could be as simple as "I have no gas so I will use FCAW" or "I don't want to mess with slag".

                            Care to elaborate on your definition of "quality of weld" some?








                            Yes I am I can and have used the same process and procedure to weld structural steel as I did ornamental steel.


                            What do you think are you still cornfused?
                            Are you LA City and FEMA 353 Qualified too?

                            Dave

                            No, I'm not confused, I'm just wondering why someone from the most earthquake prone state on the planet could be so cynical?
                            "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                            • #15
                              I do a fair amount of welding, but I don't get to talk to other welders often, so I'm sometimes unsure of how they are using their terms. Some terms are company trademarks which have been adopted as generic terms by welders (as happened with Linde's Heli-Arc,which used to be a generic term for TIG/GTAW) Also there may be some regional differences.

                              As I understand it:

                              MIG and GMAW refer to solid wire with shield-gas, sometimes referred to as "straight wire."

                              Innershield and flux-core refer to tubular, flux-containing wire with no shield-gas.

                              Dual-Shield has fluxed-wire AND shield-gas.

                              Bodybagger, is that how you are using the term "flux-core"? I ask because in my small experience with that type of wire, it seemed to me that the leftover flux was usually NOT easily removed compared with whatever is left after MIG or dual-shield welding (which is usually self-peeling). Of course it could well be that my travel speed or settings weren't optimal.

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