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AC or DC SMAW machine for 7024 rod?

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  • AC or DC SMAW machine for 7024 rod?

    Hi I'm newbie welder, any suggestions on what kind of welding machine (SMAW) should be used for a 6mm 7024 and 7018 welding rod. It says in the internet that you can use both AC and DC for it.
    I used a 400 ampere AC SMAW for the 7024 rod and 5 sticks continuous welding the machine already started to heat up.
    Thanks for your help in advance!

  • #2
    7018 will stick and be hard to start on AC, unless you use 7018AC rods. 7024 should work fine on either. I have only run 7024 on AC, and only a few times.

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    • #3
      Cope is right on the 7018 rods. They do make a special 7018 rod made to burn on AC. It is not real popular, but can be found in small quantities at most local welding stores or maybe even Lowes/Home Depot at a high price.

      The 7024 rods run well on DCRP and many rods, depending on manufacturer, will run well on DCRP, DCSP, and AC. Hobart released some "Rocket Rods" in 2007 that are all polarity 7024 rods. You will find DCSP typically gives more spatter and more penetration.

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      • #4
        E7024-1

        Just remember when using this rod, it's limited to 1F, 1G, 2F, 2G positions, as it's considered a "fast fill" or "Jet rod," (Lincoln's Jetweld-1 & 3), with high deposition rates, easy slag removal, and shallow penetration for minimum dillution, and comes packaged in 50# containers. The 5/32 runs 180-240 (A/C) and 160-215 (DC), where as a 6mm (1/4") runs between 340 & 440 amps. The 7018 A/C is more readily available, (but I think 5/32 is as big as it gets) a little more versatlile, and operates on a little less amps, and has somewhat easier restrikes. Lincoln's Excalibur 7018 MR is available in 1/4" runs best on DC+ @ 300-400 amps, and is an all position rod. Hope this helps.
        Last edited by davedarragh; 11-25-2008, 10:14 AM.
        "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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        • #5
          Hey thanks guys! Actually I tried a demo for the AC arc welding machine to a big steel fabrication company here in my country but not miller brand. Maybe I can use an alternate machine which is AC/DC capable. Yeah they said that it is supposed to be set at a very high ampere setting. Although the engineer was pleased to know that there is such a machine in my country that can burn the 7024 welding rod first rather than burning the machine first. LOLZ.
          But will the weld differ if you use DCRP instead of AC?

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          • #6
            Use DC+, set it to that and take the knob off so you are not tempted to fool with it.

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            • #7
              E7024-1 Dc

              It should run smoother on DCRP (DC+) and the amps will be a little lower @ 320-400. What brand of machine is it?
              "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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              • #8
                To Dave:
                Its a China made machine that we OEM from the manufacturer under Powercraft brand. I have some many other customers who do not have any problem with the same machine while using a 5/32" 7018 rod.

                To everyone:
                Sorry I seem to have misunderstood the DCRP term. What is it exactly? and what is that DC+ setting. The machine I used was just a normal transformer ac arc welding machine so it didn't have that kind of settings. Thanks.

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                • #9
                  Direct Current--SMAW

                  Elektro: DC refers to "direct current." It operates in one of two modes:
                  DC+ and DC -. Here's the difference. DC+ (DC reverse polarity DCRP) means the electrode is "hot" and the ground is negative. It has the deepest penetration. To illustrate, if I were to take an ice pick, heat it red hot, stab it into a block of ice, I would get good penetraion. DC- (DCEN or straight polarity) the electrode is "colder" and the work is "hot" Like taking the same block of ice, and setting it on a red hot piece of steel, it would melt, but with little penetration. It's used on very thin material, like decking (using a 6022 rod). I'm guessing that 90% of SMAW is done in the DC+ mode, it has the best arc control. A/C is a combination of DC+ and DC- as it "alternates" between the two. It's good if you are welding on magnetized material. Hope this helps
                  Last edited by davedarragh; 11-25-2008, 11:12 AM.
                  "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sberry View Post
                    Use DC+, set it to that and take the knob off so you are not tempted to fool with it.
                    Doesn't look good when you are trying to demo equipment for prospective customers. At least you didn't tell him to knock it off with a hammer like you usually do.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by davedarragh View Post
                      It's used on very thin material, like decking (using a 6022 rod).
                      I find that 6022 wets out by far the best using AC, though you have to "scratch" a new electrode a few times to get it to start. Burned 15lbs of it today actually....
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                      • #12
                        E6022 on A/C

                        Hey Bretsk2500: That's good to know. Thanks. If one only has a DC engine drive, then DC- would then have to be the ticket, 10-4? Have a nice Thanksgiving
                        "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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                        • #13
                          Hey thanks big time guys. I have lots more to ask about welding. Funny that this is the site where at last I can get some answers. LOL.

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                          • #14
                            hi guys. a little off topic, ive never heard of 6022, what is it used for?
                            07 f350 duallie w/deck
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                            • #15
                              Aws E6022

                              Black Beard: It's Lincoln's "Fleetweld 22" developed specifically for floor decking and other applications where burnthrough spot welding on sheet metal is required. It's available in 1/8 & 5/32 in 50# cartons and runs on DC- or AC current basically limited to the "1G" position. Hope this helps
                              "Bonne journe'e mes amis"

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