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  • Gfci

    One of the options on a welder I am considering has the option to add Ground Fault Circuit interruption. Is this a good idea to have or will it wind up shutting the welder down at every small change in the circuit, becoming a pain in the @#$?

  • #2
    The gfci will not cause the welder to shut down. If it activates, it will kill the ac to that circuit. Does not affect the welder itself. When working according to designed purpose, the ac power to that output is now dead because the unit detected a path to ground - the idea being to save your life. All well and good. There are some other practical considerations, but for the most part, the concept is good and of course safety is very important. weldersales

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    • #3
      I have them on my TB302 and they are not a problem.
      Don


      '06 Trailblazer 302
      '06 12RC feeder
      Super S-32P feeder

      HH210 & DP3035 spool gun
      Esab Multimaster 260
      Esab Heliarc 252 AC/DC

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      • #4
        From a constant repair problem on a welder, I find them to be a nusiance. Most Miller welders come with both a GFI and standard plug in. Keep it that way so you have a choice of running back to your welder often 100 or more feet away to reset the GFI on high idle, and hope that it does reset itself.

        When we build a remote, we use isolated receptacles so the chances of zapping your self is very slight as the grounds remain at the source and breaker protected anyways.

        Say in a humid or rainy enviroment, the GFI's will constantly trip, and eventually just blow up internally, then you have NO auxillary power period.

        I change out probably 10 a week on the Lincolns alone because of nusiance trips

        Are they safer, for sure, though I don't know of too many ginders being neutrally bonded to the frame of the grinder

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        • #5
          I put GFCI on all our machines. If your machines are GFCI equipped, MSHA wil not make you do tool and cord tests.
          FWIW, I have had very little trouble with them tripping.
          Jeff

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          • #6
            MSHA is why I got mine.
            Don


            '06 Trailblazer 302
            '06 12RC feeder
            Super S-32P feeder

            HH210 & DP3035 spool gun
            Esab Multimaster 260
            Esab Heliarc 252 AC/DC

            Comment


            • #7
              I have a gfci circuit on my service truck, can reach back to by pass it if needed but usually use it, never had a trip that comes to mind. Good for double insulated tools.

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              • #8
                GFCI is a way to add a layer of safety for cheap in many cases. Several technical issues and arguments come to mind,,, some from minds greater than my own. Possibility's involving the power unit not being grounded to the structure come mind, possibly, wet locations. In some cases possibly preferable to grounding? Have to think about it.
                I might be tempted to skip it as an option and create my own setup, wonder if it is an option for one or 2 circuits? I don't always use it, my cord reel isn't gfci but I do have one available using a common protected recept.
                Attached Files

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                • #9
                  I had to add a gfci for OSHA compliance. But, have had no issues with trips. Also had to replace my extension cords that did not have molded ends.

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