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  • Coolant

    What are people using for coolant in their tig torch coolers? I am building a cooler and I see Miller sells 2 different coolants one for HF and one for coolers with aluminum parts in contact with the coolant. What I need is a coolant for both.

    Is anybody using 100% antifreeze? That is what I was told to use by a local welder so I would have no problems with it freezing in the winter (I am in MN).

    Thanks,
    Dan
    Owner
    DW Metalworks LLC
    Miller Trailblazer 302
    Miller 8RC Feeder
    Miller Passport Plus
    Miller Dynasty 200 DX W/Coolmate 1
    Hobart Handler 135
    Hypertherm PowerMAX 30
    Smith O/A Torch Set
    Plus more tools then my wife will ever know about....

  • #2
    Dan,

    Do not use 100% auto antifreeze. The HF or low conductivity coolant is more for tig applications where you can not have any hf bleeding into the coolant system. The other coolant is for MIG applications. IF you are in a temp controlled shop where there is no issue of freezing, you can use the distilled, deionized water. This is non conductive and works fine. Remember, it's the minerals and other contaminants in the water that conducts and clogs torches.

    Good luck.

    Andy

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    • #3
      My welder (Lincoln Idealarc Tig 250) is in a non-heated garage so I need it to not freeze (I live in Minnesota), am I going to have a problem with my HF start (or continuous when doing aluminum) with regular anti-freeze?

      -Dan
      Owner
      DW Metalworks LLC
      Miller Trailblazer 302
      Miller 8RC Feeder
      Miller Passport Plus
      Miller Dynasty 200 DX W/Coolmate 1
      Hobart Handler 135
      Hypertherm PowerMAX 30
      Smith O/A Torch Set
      Plus more tools then my wife will ever know about....

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by engnerdan View Post
        My welder (Lincoln Idealarc Tig 250) is in a non-heated garage so I need it to not freeze (I live in Minnesota), am I going to have a problem with my HF start (or continuous when doing aluminum) with regular anti-freeze?

        -Dan

        As said above do not use the rugular anti-freeze. This has leak stop in it to help fill pinholes in your radiator and hoses. And guess what? It does a real good job of stopping up the hoses for you tig torch. I would just buy the Miller HF anti-freeze and run it with a mixture of distilled deionized H20. That will give you the best results.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ace4059 View Post
          As said above do not use the rugular anti-freeze. This has leak stop in it to help fill pinholes in your radiator and hoses. And guess what? It does a real good job of stopping up the hoses for you tig torch. I would just buy the Miller HF anti-freeze and run it with a mixture of distilled deionized H20. That will give you the best results.
          I use several gallons of automotive antifreeze a year in my shop ( NOT in a TIG cooler).
          And to the best of my knowledge, regular automotive antifreeze does NOT contain any "leak-stop".
          The reason to not use Regular automotive antifreeze in a TIG cooler is, it's conductive (as Andy stated). You'll introduce HF into lots of places it shouldn't be using regular automotive antifreeze in a TIG cooler.
          Use the correct stuff, it's not that expensive.
          Last edited by Frank865; 05-19-2008, 12:46 PM.
          Professional Auto Mechanic since 1974
          My own shop since 1981
          Cya Frank

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          • #6
            You might be able to buy it without the leak stop. But I do know they make some with the leak stop in it because I bought some to fix a small pin hole in an old ford 9N radiator. But yes the main reason is because of the HF with TIG.

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