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Welding cost calculator

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  • Welding cost calculator

    Is there a free program out there for calculating the cost of a job, be it the rod usage, gas usage, cost of materials, cost of labor, and such. Any help is appreciated.

  • #2
    Microsoft Templates

    I myself do not know of a welding project calculator, but you could probably modify one from Microsoft.com's library of templates.

    There's a bathroom remodeling calculator that you could replace the names with welding items and it may work for you?

    Here's a link to it: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/te...CT101444811033

    There are lots of other types of templates available though...here's the main link: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/te...s/default.aspx Scroll down to see all of the various categories.

    Good luck!

    Comment


    • #3
      The only ones Ive heard of are expensive. Could get a new Tig machine for that kind of $$$$.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thank you for those templates, Im sure I can suit them to my needs. Again thanks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
          Is there a free program out there for calculating the cost of a job, be it the rod usage, gas usage, cost of materials, cost of labor, and such. Any help is appreciated.

          There is no way a "program" can ever accuratly calulate the cost of a job unless it's a very small, very simple job and in that case why would you need help?

          The greatest tools for estimating are several years of dedicated study in the field, There are hundreds of variables that you can't calc with a program.

          The best estimaters I know are constantly honing their skills, every job you do (even if it's time and material work) you should estimate in your head, time the different parts of the job and compare your pre job estimate with the reality after the fact.
          That will dial in your estimating ability quickly, and you'll be able to quote with strong confidence in your numbers instead of "hoping" you make money on the job.

          It takes several years to be able to figure in all of the influencing factors involved from weather conditions to the skill levels/efficiency of your people.

          Fortunes are made, and lost, in estimating, and the ability to beat money out of a bid.


          JTMcC.

          Comment


          • #6
            there is one in the Miller TIG book. i'll see if i can find the page and post it for ya. may not cover it all but its a good base to work from.

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            • #7
              this may be of some help ?? may have to alter it to fit the situation a bit.
              its in chapter 9 i think.
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                There are a lot of weld calculaters out there that will give you volumn of weld metal, you plug in deposition rate for your process, cost of consumables, ect. But that doesn't give you a real world job cost until you modify the numbers.
                Esab has a very good one but Blodgett has the best in my opinion, in the Lincoln Foundation books.


                JTMcC.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Was searching around and found this: http://www.industri.no/e-weld/eng/De...1&Side=Innhold

                  Free download too!
                  Last edited by Icarus; 05-03-2008, 11:28 AM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I dont know how I let this thread slip through the cracks. It didnt show new posts on my computer, oh well. Thank you all for the links to the calculators they helped, but this is all new to me, so here is what I got, its for government contract job.

                    Job which is down in orlando florida for homeland security. All I gotta do is weld 80 pieces of flat bar that are 2" by 5" in width and length. Thats it, my job is just welding that flat bar onto the security cages. I have to weld all four sides of the flat bar which is 3/8" thick. The room is 60 square foot with no windows, and the nearest window is 45 feet away, so I know Im gonna have to run some kind of fume exhaust, but I can manage rigging up something for that. He didnt state what kind of welding process, but with the limited space and no windows, I told him I would most likely tig weld the flat bar to cut down on fumes that stick welding gives off, especially for such a small room. Im not ruling out any other welding process, and starting to think Stick welding will go faster. I dont have a mig gun so thats out of the question.

                    My questions are,

                    1. How do you right up a proposal, is it just a invoice of some time (this question is not as important as the next ones)

                    2. Im gonna be pretty straight foward, Im very confident in my welding ability's so thats not an issue, but this is my very first job, and this ones a big one, so what kind of quote would you give for 80 pieces of 2" by 5" flat bar welded on all four sides, using 3/32" inch filler (the cages are mild steel).

                    3. What do you charge for mileage going out to a job site. I mean how much do you charge the customer per mile you traveled?


                    Please put yourself in my shoes, using your years of experience just guestimate what you would charge for a job like this if you had to propose an estimate to a customer. I really need your guy's help, I literally cant afford to lose this job, the bills are depending on it. I thank you all for any help that can be given.

                    joe

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I dont need yall's help no more. I got smart and called local welding shops here posing like I needed work, and got them to do the leg work. I just took the price work up of 15 shops, and averaged the prices to get a good around estimate. Its dirty to have people think your giving them work, but desperate times call for desperate measures. I actually learned allot about what to charge people for different jobs today.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
                        Is there a free program out there for calculating the cost of a job, be it the rod usage, gas usage, cost of materials, cost of labor, and such. Any help is appreciated.
                        I think a freight calculator will work better for calculations.A freight calculator can save you the agony having to part with extra money that you had not budgeted for. This is because you might have underestimated the different factors that determine the freight classification.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by usmcruz View Post
                          I dont need yall's help no more. I got smart and called local welding shops here posing like I needed work, and got them to do the leg work. I just took the price work up of 15 shops, and averaged the prices to get a good around estimate. Its dirty to have people think your giving them work, but desperate times call for desperate measures. I actually learned allot about what to charge people for different jobs today.
                          I would check and see if liquidated damages are included in the contract. If you happen to go over the alloted time if any, you can lose very quickly on this job. I have a friend that bid a job at NASA and unforseen problems occurred on his part causing him to lose thousands of dollars and he can no longer bid contracts for the government for a set amount of years.

                          Good luck,
                          Wheelchair

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Wheelchair View Post
                            I would check and see if liquidated damages are included in the contract. If you happen to go over the alloted time if any, you can lose very quickly on this job. I have a friend that bid a job at NASA and unforseen problems occurred on his part causing him to lose thousands of dollars and he can no longer bid contracts for the government for a set amount of years.

                            Good luck,
                            Wheelchair
                            I forgot to add that the next time you need help from the local welding shops, I think they will tell you to sc----w yourself.

                            Wheelchair

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              qotations shoppers...

                              I was dreaming at a way to get rid of them, a few years ago a guy coming to my shop, dressed in a suit and tie driving a nice mercedes arrived with a roll of blue prints
                              and asked me for a quotation on a welding job.

                              I took a quick look a his project and told him to produce a fair quote on that there is about 6 hours of work and i will charge him 450.00$ payable in advance and deductible from the job if i get the contract....hahahh that guy was frustrated...

                              I was delighted, did not waste time as quoting for him to get a better price elsewhere.

                              This is now the way i treat people that want to waste my time...;o))

                              Comment

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