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To use epoxy on anchor bolts ?

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  • To use epoxy on anchor bolts ?

    Yes or no ? Installing a lift, the guy helping me installing it said to, but I also have the manual and it never mentions anything about that. Can it hurt to use it ?
    http://www.rcautoworks.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by 90blackcrx View Post
    Yes or no ? Installing a lift, the guy helping me installing it said to, but I also have the manual and it never mentions anything about that. Can it hurt to use it ?
    Can't hurt. Everybody I know who owns a lift, including myself, has epoxied the anchor bolts. Also, helps keep them from rusting if you service cars that are bringing in snow/road salt up here in the north.

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    • #3
      So just concrete epoxy ?
      http://www.rcautoworks.com

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      • #4
        What kind of anchors are you using? I would stay away from lead anchors, they tend to work loose. Does the manual recommend a specific anchor?
        When I was drilling, we used an anchor system that had the glue and sand mix in a glass tube that we would drop in the hole, then you pound the anchor bolt in and it beaks the tube and sets everything up. I can't remember the name of them but they were very strong.
        To all who contribute to this board.
        My sincere thanks , Pete.

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        • #5
          You could use epoxy. I would just use the "wedge it" style anchors. I would use the longest I could and the largest diameter that will fit through the holes.

          If you already have epoxy or if using epoxy would give you peace of mind, then by all means use it.

          Just my thoughts.
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          • #6
            properly used epoxied is an excellent anchor. used them in commercial construction all the time. just be shore to give them a good 24Hrs to fully set up. and don't forget to blow out the hole before installing.
            thanks for the help
            ......or..........
            hope i helped
            sigpic
            feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
            summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
            JAMES

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            • #7
              Sorry about the confusion of my reply!


              I did not mean use epoxy alone to glue a bolt into the concrete! The epoxy is used in conjunction with the proper required concrete anchors.

              such as these: (I used 3/4" x 6" anchors on mine)
              Attached Files

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              • #8
                The hilti epoxy is great! The pull out strength is probably several times higher (3-5X+)than the Psi rating on the concrete. We use it all the time to reset misplaced column anchor bolts and tie in rebar to existing concrete. You do have to blow out the hole and we use a small bottle brush to scrub the holes alittle. You want a good clean bond to the concrete. Cure time is also critical.

                That said we use a lot of wedge anchors for secuing brackets and forms. There are even some really good drill and screw/bolt options available for smaller projects. (Tapcons are great, dont know how I ever survived without them!) I have some bolts that work on the same principle but can't find the info on pull out strength so won't suggest them for a lift, but they go in and out great in hollow block and conc. Just the thing for securing braces and brackets and are easily removable for temp use.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by DSW View Post
                  (Tapcons are great, dont know how I ever survived without them!) I have some bolts that work on the same principle but can't find the info on pull out strength so won't suggest them for a lift, but they go in and out great in hollow block and conc. Just the thing for securing braces and brackets and are easily removable for temp use.
                  The thing I don't like about Tapcons is they seem to snap off easy if you screw them down a little to tight. The largest ones I have used is 1/4" dia.
                  To all who contribute to this board.
                  My sincere thanks , Pete.

                  Pureox OA
                  Westinghouse 300 amp AC stick
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                  Hexacon 250 watt solder iron

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                  • #10
                    TS-Off-Road Sorry about the confusion of my reply!


                    I did not mean use epoxy alone to glue a bolt into the concrete! The epoxy is used in conjunction with the proper required concrete anchors.

                    such as these: (I used 3/4" x 6" anchors on mine)


                    BAD IDEA don't mix systems, its an epoxied joint or a compression joint. adding epoxied to a compression joint will not add to its hold but rather defeat it. stick to one or the other.
                    thanks for the help
                    ......or..........
                    hope i helped
                    sigpic
                    feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                    summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                    JAMES

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                    • #11
                      RSC rentals has a two part epoxy that comes as two tubes side by side that I have used for years. You need their gun and nozzles but I have never seen this stuff fail.We use this with wedge anchors and sometimes with just allthread rod.

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                      • #12
                        20 years in the construction trade i have never seen a blue print call out for two part epoxy used with an expansion bolt. they are separate holding systems.both work, just never seen then used together. could be wrong here just never seen it called for.
                        thanks for the help
                        ......or..........
                        hope i helped
                        sigpic
                        feel free to shoot me an e-mail direct i have time to chat. james@newyorkmetalart.com
                        summer is here, plant a tree. if you don't have space or time to plant one sponsor some one else to plant one for you. a tree is an investment in our planet, help it out.
                        JAMES

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by burninbriar View Post
                          The thing I don't like about Tapcons is they seem to snap off easy if you screw them down a little to tight. The largest ones I have used is 1/4" dia.

                          The 1/4" tapcons are what I use and I do break a few now and then.Try these instead, http://www.hillmangroup.com/wedge.htm Similar to the tapcons in use but a lot heavier, sizes go up to 3/4" if I remember. My local Sears hardware stocks them and so do several of the concrete suppy companies that I use.

                          http://www.powers.com/aust/submittal...0Submittal.pdf

                          This pdf has all the load spects. for the different bolt sizes buried in it. Sorry I don't know how to simplify a pdf to make it easier to find the info (hence the site 1st site above for a retailer).

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                          • #14
                            Most guys who install lifts don't use any kind of epoxy or anchor cement, but I think that is because they only have about 4 hours to get the job done. There is no time to wait around for anything to cure.

                            My lift came with 3/4"x5" wedge anchors and the instructions wanted them tightened to 85ft/lb of torque. On the first post, I found that half of them would start to pull out before I got them that tight. I drilled clean straight holes that weren't too sloppy, but some of them just would not hold. So, I pull them all out and started over with a new set of anchors. I filled up each hole with anchor cement, drove the wedge anchor in and let them set overnight. The next day, I tightened them all up and they didn't budge a bit. Good and snug!

                            Typical anchor cement sets to 2,000PSI in about two hours and fully cures way above that. Your slab probably isn't over 3,000PSI, so no need to use anything much stronger than that. Epoxy is also much more costly than anchor cement. You can buy a 10 pound tub of anchor cement pretty cheap. It sets up in about 5 minutes so only mix enough for one hole at a time. I used disposable paper cups and wooden popsicle sticks to mix it with. Anchor cement also expands slightly as it dries so it will fill any voids around the anchor. Don't forget to "wet" the hole by pouring a small amount of water down it. That will help keep the moisture from being sucked out of the anchor cement. You'll need to wipe up the excess anchor cement when you pound in the anchors, but that's about the worst of it.

                            I installed the basket ball goal in the picture in my shop after it was built. I drilled four oversized holes, dropped in some 5/8Ē threaded rods, and poured in the anchor cement. It set up so fast, I almost didnít have time to work it smooth on the top. Two hours later, I was dunking on it. Because of the overhanging goal, Iím sure that has a lot more pressure on it than my lift does. This part of the slab has a deep trench similar to a footer so I was able to go more than 4 inches down. But, I think I could have put this in a typical 4Ē slab and the anchor cement would hold as long as the rest of the slab would.
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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                              BAD IDEA don't mix systems, its an epoxied joint or a compression joint. adding epoxied to a compression joint will not add to its hold but rather defeat it. stick to one or the other.

                              The epoxy I used took 3 days to set. The wedge anchor was doing its job fine, long before the epoxy cured.

                              Why would the epoxy have a negative effect on the anchor??

                              I could see if you tried to tighten the wedge anchor AFTER the epoxy cured, you may have issues.

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