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Aluminum Repairs on Beech Staggerwing Cowling

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  • Aluminum Repairs on Beech Staggerwing Cowling

    These techniques are as valuable for automotive motorsports as they are for vintage aircraft...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xzP3OsJUbj8

  • #2
    Beechcraft Model 17 Staggerwing

    For those that may not be familiar with the D17S

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beech_Staggerwing

    and a better pic

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    one of the most beautiful biplanes ever built IMHO

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    • #3
      You ain't wrong. I've always loved that model. Mulligan is nice too. I love the GEE BEES by the Granville Bros. I have an r/c model of the model D. Flies well. One of my favorites is the Travel Air Mystery Ship.
      I also have a Ryan STA special r/c. It was a modified STA and flown by a guy named John Goshnee or something like that. He flew it as a stunt plane. It's painted red and white and has checkerboard on bottom of wing. Another beautifil aircraft. The 30's era were my favorite I think. Radial engines and propellers make my loins burn.
      Last edited by monte55; 06-11-2012, 06:46 PM.

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      • #4
        A little known fact was where that modified Ryan aircraft came from. My dad sold that aircraft to John Gosney after we had completely modified it. Dad had flown it in numerous airshows when I was a teenager over 40 years ago. I have fond memories of those days. Of welding interest, I clearly remember my dad welding a new modified engine mount for the bigger engine we installed. Dad was an excellent aceytlene welder. He had to be, his life depended on it. Here's a picture of my dad standing next to the airplane with the late Marion Cole in the cockpit.

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        Last edited by Gobysky; 06-12-2012, 07:53 AM.

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        • #5
          Wow. That is beautiful. That is exactly the way my r/c plane looks. It was not an easy build. I had to make many things on my own. I believe they used a Menasca (sp?) engine in it. I forget the exact hp. The ailerons were special the way they fit into the rear of the wing. I had to make special hinges for them to pivot correctly. I love spatted pants too.It took me quite to do all the painting and trim but well worth it. Did you guy paint it also and who came up with the paint scheme. When it rolled out, I'll bet it turned some heads.

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          • #6
            Do you have a picture of it not cropped?. What year was that picture taken?

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            • #7
              I believe that picture was taken in the late 60's, near Waco, Tx. My brother is the keeper of all the family aviation pictures, and has an excellent memory of specifics about the airplane. I was pretty young then, but I think the original engine was a 135 hp Menasco. Dad sold the engine and installed a 200 hp Ranger. Made a huge difference in performance .
              Yes, we came up with the paint scheme. I can remember helping dad mask the bottoms of the wings to make the checkerboarding. He was an excellent spray painter also.

              I'll see if I can get my brother to email me some better pictures, and post one later.
              Last edited by Gobysky; 06-12-2012, 07:54 AM.

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              • #8
                That would be great More pics. Do you remember how much the plane sold for? I wonder it still exists

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                • #9
                  Didn't mean to hijack this thread and get away from the welding theme. Somewhere in our archives we have pictures of the acetylene welded engine mount, yet to be scanned into digital format. There was really no aluminum welding on this aircraft, since it was all riveted.

                  The one photo with three people standing in front of it, is my dad, my brother, and myself taken back in the 60's. The photo with the man standing holding onto the propeller is my late father. He was not only an excellent pilot, but a master welder, and painter, and general aircraft tech. He retired as an airline pilot.

                  Monte55, can't remember what the airplane sold for. The aircraft was destroyed when John Gosney's mechanic was flying it. Unfortunately the mechanic lost his life.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Gobysky View Post
                    Didn't mean to hijack this thread and get away from the welding theme. Somewhere in our archives we have pictures of the acetylene welded engine mount, yet to be scanned into digital format. There was really no aluminum welding on this aircraft, since it was all riveted.

                    The one photo with three people standing in front of it, is my dad, my brother, and myself taken back in the 60's. The photo with the man standing holding onto the propeller is my late father. He was not only an excellent pilot, but a master welder, and painter, and general aircraft tech. He retired as an airline pilot.

                    Monte55, can't remember what the airplane sold for. The aircraft was destroyed when John Gosney's mechanic was flying it. Unfortunately the mechanic lost his life.

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                    Not a hijack at all!!

                    I think it is terrific that you are sharing these with us..... I was lucky enough to have done some warbird/racer work as a young man, including a P-38 Unlimited Racer that belonged to Tom Friedkin,,, during the late 70s...... so I have a particular spot in my heart for racers....

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                    • #11
                      I agree..No hijack. Great pictures. More please. You need to make an album here and put the pictures there. Even the original Sta trainer with polished metal was good looking. I would rather look at these than another grill made from a trash can.

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                      • #12
                        Aluminum Repairs on Beech Staggerwing Cowling

                        Ok, I'll see what my brother can dig up.

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                        • #13
                          Thanks for this thread.
                          Ya'll have opened a window to the past, that we seldom get to look through.
                          Last edited by Frank865; 06-12-2012, 10:01 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Aircraft of this era were built with relatively simple materials and tools...
                            .... but with copoius amounts of skill, dedication and time...

                            always a joy to behold.....

                            pls more pics... especially of construction and mods.....

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