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1940's Willys CJ2A

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  • Shnitzlhaus
    started a topic 1940's Willys CJ2A

    1940's Willys CJ2A

    hi I am a student (19yr old) going to be working on a Willys CJ2A to bring it back to life the way I want it.

    before I dive into the body work I am practicing my welds.
    since I am new to body work, I dont really know what I am doing. I know that I dont want to heat up the metal to much or it will warp my body.

    should I do a lot of tack welds or do I do constant weld but for a very short bead say 1''.

    here are some of my test pieces.








  • big mike
    replied
    Here is a thread that I thought had some amazing skill in it and I learned a good amount from it.
    http://www.garagejournal.com/forum/s...G+PATCH+PANELS

    Leave a comment:


  • Bearston
    replied
    Heat Sink, Hammer + Dollie, Easy Grind

    Let your welds cool on their own, do not force cooling with air or damp rag, doing so will in fact make the distortions worse and the welds more brittle and prone to cracking than if you let it cool on it's own. Also try a heat sink on the backside of the weld to draw excess heat out. Use Aluminum or Copper as a heat sink, weld won''t stick to it and will minimize warpage, especially on thse flat panels. Regardless of what you do, distortion is imminent, how you deal with it affects your finish. Also turn up the heat a bit more, it would be nice to see better fusion on the backside of those welds, that is an ideal spot to re-introduce rust. Rather than tack beside tack, run a 1/2" to 1" continuous bead to make sure there are no voids. If you do decide to run a series of tacks, cover 1/3 to 1/2 half of the previous tack to prevent those rust causing voids around the tacks.Esab Easy-Grind wire 0.23" is a good choice, not quite as brittle as standard wire plus it grinds easier and distorts less. Try hammer and dolly method (You Tube) to flatten those welds a little meaning less grinding heat build-up and distortion. Warpage is a fact, you're going to have to deal with it regardless, so just keep practicing until your technique produces the least amount of distortion and once you finish welding, your next job will be to straighten out those welds, Every weld is better than the last...practice, practice, practice and keep up the good work, the more you prepare, the better.......there's my 2 pennies worth.

    Leave a comment:


  • Blondie_486
    replied
    Originally posted by gusb View Post
    I haven't actually touched a vertical mill in many years - you almost could say it was another life

    They seem to be reasonably priced these days, but I haven't found much around here (SF Bay Area, CA). A few local tool shops, etc. have my phone number in case something reasonable comes up.

    I'd love to find an old Hardinge tool room lathe too, but realize that's really an impossible dream.
    Too bad you're not in Ohio there are a few Hardinge tool room lathes in the northeast section of the state and not too terribly priced but the shipping to the bay area would kill any decent deal you might be able to make.

    Leave a comment:


  • jerems
    replied
    Looking good

    trial and error...with a few questions to the people who know..will eventually produce the desired result. It doesn't look bad but there is room for improvement. With a little effort the end result will be this picture. Good luck.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • cncmachinist
    replied
    ok there starting to get into the butter zone of the welds

    check your gas theres burn on the sides of your welds it could be set to low
    leave the wire speed its good but crank the voltage up theres not enough wet out for body panels
    hold the tack for the same amount of time and alternate along the seem when welding it in the car to avoid warping and let the metal cool down some

    keep practicing and experimenting with the setting to get it really nice

    Leave a comment:


  • Shnitzlhaus
    replied
    I have a taig lathe and sherline 5400 mill. weee.

    Gus check out my youtube channel. I make movies whenever I can its another hobby.

    so I did another attempt. this time I tried rotating the torch and took down my wire speed some.









    only thing, it warps way to easy. I am thinking when I work on my jeep I will do some anchoring welds like that then turn it down some where I can control it easier.

    im sure it would hold.

    Leave a comment:


  • gusb
    replied
    I haven't actually touched a vertical mill in many years - you almost could say it was another life

    They seem to be reasonably priced these days, but I haven't found much around here (SF Bay Area, CA). A few local tool shops, etc. have my phone number in case something reasonable comes up.

    I'd love to find an old Hardinge tool room lathe too, but realize that's really an impossible dream.


    Originally posted by cncmachinist View Post
    you wont believe this is bought two at auction for 1200 a piece with old kurt vise that still work


    the back of the machine on the manufactures plate its stamped USACE or united states army corps of engineers 1946

    Leave a comment:


  • davinci2010
    replied
    The basic design worked, and Bridgeport didn't mess with it. I have to respect that! I've run into a few MT mechanics that have worked on some pretty old ones as well. I'd love to have some old Bridgeport, Cincinatti Bickford, or LeBlonde stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • cncmachinist
    replied
    you wont believe this is bought two at auction for 1200 a piece with old kurt vise that still work


    the back of the machine on the manufactures plate its stamped USACE or united states army corps of engineers 1946
    Last edited by cncmachinist; 07-15-2010, 10:12 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gusb
    replied
    Nice video Shnitzlhaus - if you get tired of working on the Jeep you can always start making movies.

    I would get off the plywood (unless you just like the smell of burning wood). At least a couple of clamps in place of the magnets to give yourself some room down under the work-piece. IMH(inexperienced)O - you still need more penetration and a good join backside. I would count - "one thousand, two thousand" - or even burn through a few times to to get a feel for what's too much - just watch out for rolling ***** of fire.

    cncmachinist sounds right-on to me. Wish I had a 1946 Bridgeport (or any Bridgeport for that matter)!
    Last edited by gusb; 07-15-2010, 07:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • cncmachinist
    replied
    hey i watched your video its good tacks but go up 1-2 on power (volts) but leave the wire speed and when you tack rotate the torch in a circle motion and hold it down for 1-2 sec more than you were for tacks

    itll put more bead down get full fusion and will wet the bead out more

    also since you were welding on a piece of plywood get a piece of steel or copper of a heavy gauge to use as a heat sink and it will really help with sinking the heat through the metal

    Leave a comment:


  • Shnitzlhaus
    replied
    video I did super fast

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Tw8oBdqm7s

    Leave a comment:


  • Shnitzlhaus
    replied
    here is todays attempts
    bottom weld = todays


    bottom again

    Leave a comment:


  • gusb
    replied
    "sizzle" - think bacon in the frying pan.

    No beads for me - the tacks finally begin to close the gaps - move around the work piece to control the heat. Grind down any previous tack a bit before a new tack finally meets up with it.

    Wire speed/V (in this case) should not relate much to "I would have to weld faster..." you're just looking for the correct setting for the work-piece/GA, etc. Someone here with more experience than I should be able to help you with your Craftsman machine's settings.

    Leave a comment:

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