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  • TurboDSM
    started a topic Rust scale removal methods before paint?

    Rust scale removal methods before paint?

    I picked up a used receiver hitch that has areas of rust scale underneath peeling paint. I want to clean it up so it looks decent and prevents rust from developing further.

    What would be a good method to remove the rust so I can repaint it? Wire wheel on an angle grinder? Flap disk? Something else?

    I don't have access to a media blaster, nor is the piece valuable enough to pay someone to do this.

    After removing the rust manually, is there a chemical worth putting on it to take care of any rust I missed and help prevent rust in the future; something that is OK to primer and paint over?

    Any recommended brands or type of rattle can primer/paint to use on the receiver hitch?

    Sorry if these questions have been answered before, my searches didn't pull up what I was looking for.

    Thanks for your help.

  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Got it done. The wire wheel did OK but I ended up using a flap disk on the heavy rust spots.

    One coat of the Rust Reformer. Just a light coat of sandable primer (I like to do a light sanding before paint) and 3 coats of paint.






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  • H80N
    replied
    TurboDSM
    if you live in winter/salt country you will redo it every few years regardless.. You have gotten it very clean... in your situation I would go with the rust reformer.. give it 24hours in a warm dry place to set and dry then brush 2 good coats of rustoleum black on it.. (or purple or red or... your decision)
    then you are good to go...
    thanks
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    TurboDSM
    these conversion coatings are a one step deal converter/primer... one of the easiest to get is Rust-Oleum Rust Reformer.... most hardware stores carry it...

    http://www.rustoleum.com/product.asp...ct_id=30&SBL=1

    you may find this a painless solution
    thanks
    Heiti
    Good ol' Rust-Oleum...lol Reminds me of something I'd pickup at wally world when I was 12.

    Seriously, is it worth using or am I going to be redoing it in a few years, even with a good solid topcoat?

    Thanks again Heiti

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  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Making progress. Still a lot of work to do with a wire wheel.





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  • H80N
    replied
    TurboDSM
    these conversion coatings are a one step deal converter/primer... one of the easiest to get is Rust-Oleum Rust Reformer.... most hardware stores carry it...

    http://www.rustoleum.com/product.asp...ct_id=30&SBL=1

    you may find this a painless solution
    thanks
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    TurboDSM
    I think what you may be looking for is a tannic acid type conversion coating like por15 and many others... one that converts the brown rust to an inactive BLACK magnetite... and seals the surface with a water based latex primer..that you can paint over with enamel once set up.. and dried.. here is a link to one of those products... there are a zillion of them with about the same recipe..

    http://www.corroseal.com/technical/productdata.aspx

    the tractor collector community swears by that class of stuff and it works..
    hope this helps
    Heiti
    So a self etching primer?

    Now I can't decide what to do...lol

    This thing doesn't need to be perfect. Etching primer sounds a bit more simple with less room for error than phosphoric acid/primer process. I suppose it might depend on how much rust I'm able to physically remove before hand.

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Originally posted by crawdaddy View Post
    If you plan on using automotive epoxy make sure its compatible with acid treatments or it will delaminate down the road.Phosphoric acid isnt going to do much to heavy rust.Im suprised no one here has mentioned Muratic acid it removes rust very quickly and the metal will look brand new in no time flat.You just need to use it safely and keep any waste away from children or pets.Mike
    Thanks Mike, something to keep an eye out for as far as epoxy primer. Muriatic (Hydrochloric) acid...not sure I want to venture there. I would be better off grinding the rust out.

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    TurboDSM
    I think what you may be looking for is a tannic acid type conversion coating like por15 and many others... one that converts the brown rust to an inactive BLACK magnetite... and seals the surface with a water based latex primer..that you can paint over with enamel once set up.. and dried.. here is a link to one of those products... there are a zillion of them with about the same recipe..

    http://www.corroseal.com/technical/productdata.aspx

    the tractor collector community swears by that class of stuff and it works..
    hope this helps
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    OSPHO
    is really a phosphoric acid conversion coating... and does not really remove much rust.. just leaves a phosphate layer on it... it is good stuff for what it was intended but I would not use it on the heavy stuff..
    Thanks Heiti. Heavy stuff, like heavy rust? Looks like I need something that can keep the cavities under control.

    Leave a comment:


  • crawdaddy
    replied
    Originally posted by TurboDSM View Post
    Any one ever use rust remover acid called "OSPHO"?

    It doesn't require a water rinse like some of the other rust converting chemicals. Water is the last thing I want to put on bare metal before paint.

    If I use an acid like this, I don't think it would be wise to use an etching primer. From my understanding an etching primer is like a primer and acid combo. I think an epoxy primer will be better.

    Here's the process I'm thinking now:
    Manually remove as much rust/paint as possible (almost done)
    wipe down with some type of wax and grease cleaner (not acetone or thinner)
    Apply rust chemical (OSPHO?)
    use scotch bright pad to remove chemical leftovers
    wipe with tack cloth
    apply epoxy primer
    block sand and wipe with tack cloth
    apply topcoat (paint)

    Sound OK?
    If you plan on using automotive epoxy make sure its compatible with acid treatments or it will delaminate down the road.Phosphoric acid isnt going to do much to heavy rust.Im suprised no one here has mentioned Muratic acid it removes rust very quickly and the metal will look brand new in no time flat.You just need to use it safely and keep any waste away from children or pets.Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • crawdaddy
    replied
    Originally posted by Sammy View Post
    Don't want to hi jack the thread but how much CFM or how big of a tank do you need for one of those small hand held blasters? Would an 8 gallon tank do it?
    Thanks in advance
    8 gallons would be a little light but it also depends on the CFM of the compressor if you have a high output pump it might work or you could do small areas then wait for it to fill. Its only 30 or 40 bucks might be worth it to check it out.Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • H80N
    replied
    OSPHO
    is really a phosphoric acid conversion coating... and does not really remove much rust.. just leaves a phosphate layer on it... it is good stuff for what it was intended but I would not use it on the heavy stuff.. here is a link to their site...

    http://www.ospho.com/directions.htm


    hope this helps
    Heiti

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Any one ever use rust remover acid called "OSPHO"?

    It doesn't require a water rinse like some of the other rust converting chemicals. Water is the last thing I want to put on bare metal before paint.

    If I use an acid like this, I don't think it would be wise to use an etching primer. From my understanding an etching primer is like a primer and acid combo. I think an epoxy primer will be better.

    Here's the process I'm thinking now:
    Manually remove as much rust/paint as possible (almost done)
    wipe down with some type of wax and grease cleaner (not acetone or thinner)
    Apply rust chemical (OSPHO?)
    use scotch bright pad to remove chemical leftovers
    wipe with tack cloth
    apply epoxy primer
    block sand and wipe with tack cloth
    apply topcoat (paint)

    Sound OK?

    Leave a comment:


  • TurboDSM
    replied
    Originally posted by H80N View Post
    in case you need it... that hitch number goes to a Subaru Forester..
    Thanks, the guy I bought it from pulled it from a Forester. It's going on an Impreza though. Already mocked it up and it should fit no problem (my 97 Impreza and his 2000 Forester have the same basic chassis). So I have a class III hitch going on an application that normally would only have a class I hitch. Not that I'm going to be pulling anything that requires class III.

    I've made some good progress in removing the rust and paint. No pics of the progress yet, I'll try to get some up soon.

    I stopped by Harbor Freight and picked up a wire wheel and cup, also picked up one of these for grins:


    WOW, I'm impressed! That thing pulls paint off like wiping dust off with a rag. Well, maybe not quite that easily but I like it compared to other things I've used. It does OK with the rust, but was worth it to strip the paint without damaging the metal.

    It's time for a a bit more brushing, chemical on the rust spots and then primer/paint.
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