Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

110v outlet

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Chinolbz
    started a topic 110v outlet

    110v outlet

    Hi guys. New to posting but I have been lurking for years. I am going to try this area as well. I see that many of the newer 220v welders have a 110v outlet installed on them for coolers or grinders or whatever. How is this accomplished? I have looked at my Square wave 175 and there is no neutral wire. I would like to add a 110v outlet but I don't see an easy way. Thanks!

  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr Bigs View Post
    You're mistaken neutral and ground don't terminate at the service. Neutral comes from the utility company and ground is supplied by Earth(driven stake) or the water main(clamp). I also forgot building steel by cadweld or drill & tap.
    Um, I didn't say they terminate at the service. I said they were tied together (bonded) at the service.

    Leave a comment:


  • jweller
    replied
    OK thanks guys. I know DC electronics pretty well, but AC is completely different.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Bigs
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
    It is very important that they are tied together in one and only one location, the main service entrance. It is illegal and dangerous to tie them together in other locations. Older dryers and ranges with 3-prong plugs used to do this, as a cost saving measure, but that, too, was done away with long ago, and now they are four wires, even though two of them might go to the same bar in the panel.
    You're mistaken neutral and ground don't terminate at the service. Neutral comes from the utility company and ground is supplied by Earth(driven stake) or the water main(clamp). I also forgot building steel by cadweld or drill & tap.
    Last edited by Mr Bigs; 12-19-2008, 09:47 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Originally posted by jweller View Post
    ...isn't it pretty standard to have the neutral and the ground tied together in the box...
    It is very important that they are tied together in one and only one location, the main service entrance. It is illegal and dangerous to tie them together in other locations. Older dryers and ranges with 3-prong plugs used to do this, as a cost saving measure, but that, too, was done away with long ago, and now they are four wires, even though two of them might go to the same bar in the panel.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Bigs
    replied
    Originally posted by jweller View Post
    I'm not an electrician, but isn't it pretty standard to have the neutral and the ground tied together in the box? I don't see how it makes a difference.

    I'm not contradicting, I'm asking for clarification.
    It makes a huge difference. Neutral and ground are not the same thing,ground is for safety neutral is return to point of distribution. When you tie neutral to ground you potentially energize the machines chassis back on the ground and could knock yourself or someone else on their ass.

    Leave a comment:


  • jweller
    replied
    Originally posted by MAC702 View Post
    Yes, you need a neutral. Do NOT use a ground to return the unbalanced 120V from a grinder!

    I'm not an electrician, but isn't it pretty standard to have the neutral and the ground tied together in the box? I don't see how it makes a difference.

    I'm not contradicting, I'm asking for clarification.

    Leave a comment:


  • MAC702
    replied
    Yes, you need a neutral. Do NOT use a ground to return the unbalanced 120V from a grinder!

    The machines that have 120V available, without having a neutral wire in the plug, use a tap off of the transformer inside.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr Bigs
    replied
    To accomplish this their is a neutral in the machine which is what gets you the 110. So that means it's a 4 or 5(3 phase or single phase) wire setup,2 hots 1 neutral & ground or 3 hots 1 neutral & ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chinolbz
    replied
    I don't need a neutral?

    Leave a comment:


  • 84ZMike
    replied
    A 220 is two 110 "legs" feed in.... not really a big deal..... using a multi meter connect your leads (from the meter) one to the center and one to the right / left prong of the receptacle and you will see 110 on each one..... just remember if you are welding and your buddy plugs up the grinder you will trip the breaker as the draw is on one breaker....plus (unless you add it) the 110 rep. wont have a fault protection and could let some magic smoke out

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X