Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Any other Heli-Coil junkies in here?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • turboglenn
    started a topic Any other Heli-Coil junkies in here?

    Any other Heli-Coil junkies in here?

    I was just digging through some bolts looking for info for another post here and came across my "heli-coil box". It's a little plastic storage tote with nothing but heli-coils, the tools & taps for installing them, the taps for the size hole they are repairing if i just want to make a new hole and thread it and the drill bits for all the above combos. I do mainly metric so i keep m6 x 1 ...M8 x 1.25 and M10 x 1.25 and of course i have a few standards 3/8 x 24 .. 7/16 x 18 and one other one.

    When I build an aluminum block or head engine if the customer is up for it and knows what i do about aluminum and threads I'll do a complete block or head if they have the money for it (some do) and then i just feel like it's "built ford tough" LOL

    Personally on my car i do as many as i can in spurts when i have something off or have a head machined or anything like that. aside from wishing i could find an easier way to bore the new hole straight, it is for some reasom, something i absolutely love to do...kinda weird i gues but oh well

    So anyone else nuts over heli-coils ?????

  • satyak
    replied
    Helicoil Thread Repair System

    Helicoil thread repair system a reliable technology

    HeliCoil System for Thread Repair & Preventive Maintenance of plastic moulds , machinery , soft metal assembly and all electro-mechanical equipment.

    The HeliCoil System is for creation of Stronger & Longer lasting threads while Designing a component or Repairing of component having damaged female threads.

    WHY USE HeliCoil

    • Create Stronger and longer lasting threads in soft & light metal components made of Aluminium , Composite Alloys or Plastics & Polymers where internal threads of a component are prone to damage due to operating conditions of the equipment the same are fitted in.

    • HeliCoil inserts are made from 18-8 grade cold rolled stainless steel having tensile strength ranging from 1,50,000 – 2,00,000 PSI , Hardness between 43-50 HRC which gives a better description of how HeliCoil inserts can withstand a good amount of assembly stress besides creating a stronger thread in weak materials.

    • HeliCoil in stainless steel can be safely used in continuous operating temperatures up to 315 degree C & occasional peak temperature of
    425 degree C .

    • HeliCoil are cold rolled formed & have a very superior surface finish providing maximum surface to surface contact area , thereby greater clamping action and minimum friction between bolt & female thread flank.

    • HeliCoil is Anti-Corrosive & Non- Magnetic
    Made of 18-8 grade cold rolled stainless steel it provides a better resistance to corrosion under extreme atmospheric conditions and operational environments.

    • HeliCoil reduces bolt failure, breaking & thread stripping

    The common known causes of bolt failure and breaking or thread stripping are over torque , thread pitch angle errors , progressive pitch errors, high stress conditions & continuous vibrations.
    In absence of HeliCoil , it has been observed that a bolt is subject to an average tightening load of more than 70% over the first two threads near to its collar or over a few threads finding a proper surface contact .
    The conditions even get worst when normal machined threads are associated with threads having pitch errors and above adverse conditions.

    HeliCoil stretches itself to compensate for pitch angle errors & progressive pitch errors thereby providing a better surface contact & more even load distribution to prevent the bolt failures.
    HeliCoil has a “designed-in” radial & axial elasticity.
    This allows the shearing load to be transformed into favourable hoop stress or radial load towards the full length of the insert. With result the load gets more evenly transformed over the entire length of the threads of a bolt, thus bolt breaking & thread shearing is significantly reduced.

    HeliCoil - A Gift to Designers
    The above mentioned compensation & even load distribution features allow a superior reliability of assembly and without compromising on performance Allows the Designers to choose a bolts of lower strength , bolt of alternate metals, bolt having lesser length , creating possibility of lower torque requirements for soft metals , retaining strength of components having less wall thickness.

    HeliCoil inserts are also available with a locking coil for thread locking of screws & bolts to prevent loosening due to heavy or continuous vibrations.
    Unlike the other methods used for thread locking like adhesives , the locking type HeliCoil is reusable for several bolt opening & tightening cycles .

    Use of HeliCoil eliminates most of the given problems as it remains in a compressed state inside the threaded hole & holds tightly to the wall despite variable heat expansion , vibrations & high impact conditions. HeliCoil doesn’t get loose by repeated tightening or opening of bolt .
    The HeliCoil is installed by a tool which compresses it at first to get installed in a threaded hole after which it sits tightly against the thread flanks , the only way it can be taken out is by using a tool which reduces it in diameter during extraction.

    HeliCoil Cuts on outsourcing repairs , reduces equipment down time & avoid expensive conventional methods in practice.
    Helicoil is an easy to use good technology & one could do it on own
    at a low cost.
    E-Mail : business@noblefix.com
    Web Site : www.noblefix.com

    Leave a comment:


  • Powerstrokinit
    replied
    Thread reapairs are great. I have used them on 3" turbine bolts before. They are a good permanent repair.

    Tobin

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyEddie
    replied
    Ooops

    FusionKing
    Please let me apologize for being so quick to come back like that and I would like to start over if it is ok with you????

    First-- I do like Heli coils and have drilled and taped thousands of them, the ones that I found to be the toughest were 2-56 in titanium cause it was a real pain to drill out the broken taps. We tried to EDM them out one time but found that there was a HAZ with that and they were more difficult to tap so we just drilled them out. Helicoils do have limits and are not a cure all for everything. If the hole is oval or at an angle a mill or drill jig is required to repair.

    I have found that Heli coils are a BIG NO NO in salt water. I live on the coast and have taken to working on some of the boats that are down the street at the Marina. Aluminum works great till a fastener is put in it then it is just a matter of time before it falls apart. Even stainless, by itself, is no match for the salt water. I have put rod holders up in the cabin just to have the SS screws fail after less than three years.

    Helicoils with stainless fasteners going in to them do not want to come apart without gauling or just welding themselves together.


    Every thing has its place and there is a place for helicoils.

    Hope the Thanksgiving bunny was good to you
    Robert

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by LuckyEddie View Post
    That's exactly how I took it. Re-read post #1 and #10
    __________________


    Post #1
    Pardon me

    I guess that after I read the first post

    "So anyone else nuts over heli-coils ?????"

    should have answered with a simple

    Yes

    But I didn't so please forgive me for offending you.


    Post #10

    I have no idea.

    I make my own inserts for hollow tubing and weld them in.


    Turboglen has a lathe, mill and other shop equipment as do I

    I also do not understand "and i'll say **** yea!!"

    Heck man you ain't offending me at all!!! I just like to stir the pot and helping Turboglen's thread going...it has been a good one to say the least with many good info and links. Sharing ideas and agreeing to dis-agree is what we are all about here.
    I am just sorta pointing out that I would have to think a hand drill is a clumsy way to do this and only do it if it makes the dif between racing or setting in the garage ...trust me I understand. It is just too crude for my taste. I used to race Nascar asphalt Grand American late Models and they are an entirely fabricated tube chassis unlike traditional late models that use a frame from a car to begin with. I built my own.
    Things get really crazy when it comes down to do we rig it for the weekend or do we scatter it and lay out a week?
    I've owned 2 machine shops (automotive) and I used to be a machinist in the Army and much of their training was aimed at doing this very thing out in the field. We had a bunch of crazy mechanics who would break off every bolt for exhaust manifolds on M1-51A1's (jeeps) and then bring them to me. Along with everything else they could screw up.
    It went well with my hillbilly junkyard background for sure. When i got out of their I was a firm believer in doing everything to keep from messing threads up.
    Now I have my own aluminum repair biz and I STILL see every type of thread screw-up imaginable and get to fix them.
    This thread has sorta made me look at this in a different light tho. I'll admit but all of my insert conversions if needed would be done on a professional set-up. it is to hard to do countless counterbores and hold any kind of tolerences both on location and to size as well as depth. Plus keeping the tap straight. Most heli-coils that I get to fix are entirely FUBAR already.
    Now despite how I feel myself I will say I would imagine that Turbo-Glenn has gotten WAY WAY better at doing this than the average bear!!
    Happy Thankgiving!!

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyEddie
    replied
    That's exactly how I took it. Re-read post #1 and #10
    __________________


    Post #1
    Pardon me

    I guess that after I read the first post

    "So anyone else nuts over heli-coils ?????"

    should have answered with a simple

    Yes

    But I didn't so please forgive me for offending you.


    Post #10

    I have no idea.

    I make my own inserts for hollow tubing and weld them in.


    Turboglen has a lathe, mill and other shop equipment as do I

    I also do not understand "and i'll say **** yea!!"
    Last edited by LuckyEddie; 11-28-2008, 10:25 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Originally posted by LuckyEddie View Post
    I don't think that you would go at an expensive block with an electric drill and a hand tap in the first place.

    That's exactly how I took it. Re-read post #1 and #10

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyEddie
    replied
    I don't think that you would go at an expensive block with an electric drill and a hand tap in the first place.
    There are some rules to be followed and Helicoils are a permanent repair. You would need to get the Helicoil guide sheet for the insert that you want to use, this would give you the proper hole diameter, hole depth, minimum tap depth and champer diameter. Most Helicoils fail because they are not 1-1/2 to 2 turns below the surface (more for over 5/16-16) and the hole is too big.

    Leave a comment:


  • FusionKing
    replied
    Yea but when you say "properly prepared" you say a mouthful
    Mount that block in a mill and go for it and i'll say **** yea!!

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyEddie
    replied
    I also love helicoils

    Turboglenn

    I worked for Honeywell space and Avionics in NC as a machining manager. We used Helicoil inserts in everything that went into space, from 15-5PH stainless,6061 Aluminum,7075 aluminum and even titanium. All threads were to be self locking. To my knowledge we never had a failure. The only problem would be with a stainless screw going into the insert which was also stainless, could gaul and we were not allowed to use anything on the threads. I now use them in cast iron engine blocks, intake manifolds and transmission to bell housing bolts with no failure so far. If the correct insert is put into a properly prepared hole there should be no problem with it ever.

    Later

    Leave a comment:


  • ABYSS
    replied
    maybe RIVNUTS

    Originally posted by turboglenn View Post
    I guess i have just had good luck with them the whole timei've used them. Aside from getting a hole drilled crooked when i'm in an odd position doing the work, I haven't had hardley any issues with heli-coils. It sounds like some of you use them in much more rigorouse enviroments than i do though.

    keensert? I'm going to have to google that one. i'm still trying to find the inserts that the japanese motorcycle makers put in their subframes. The tubes are hollow and the inserts look similar to some of the ones on the ez-lok page but none of them that look right are for the application i'm needing. I need something that will slip in a hole in hollow box stock. Even if i have tto tack the edge to keep it from spinning it wouldn't bother me at all. But i havent' found a good insert for hollow aluminum structures yet.
    It is a avaition component but it make work for what you are looking for.

    http://www.hansonrivet.com/w64.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • turboglenn
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicegrip View Post
    Another vote for Timeserts. Many a Porsche case has been improved with them. Just peplacing studs with bigger studs is not that simple in some motors. The studs have to be matched to the rest of the system for even clamping during use. Installing time serts and Racewear studs is part of the improvment plan on Porsche motor cases when used for racing.
    The two just go hand in hand. You'd almost htink Porshe owned heli-coil if you didn't know any better. Since having to use them on countless porsche engines, i have just come to want to do complete aluminum castings up with heli-coil/time-serts as soon as they're prepped from the machine shop, i thought i was going to be the only one :P

    Leave a comment:


  • LA Weld
    replied
    Three votes for Timesert.

    I have done quite a few older HD refits and always used Timeserts for the cases and knock on wood no failures. I have also did a alot of spark plug repairs, customers would bring the heads wondering why no more threads in the head. Gotta love Yuppi mechanics. tight and hot always made me money, and we are not talkin their wifes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicegrip
    replied
    Another vote for Timeserts. Many a Porsche case has been improved with them. Just peplacing studs with bigger studs is not that simple in some motors. The studs have to be matched to the rest of the system for even clamping during use. Installing time serts and Racewear studs is part of the improvment plan on Porsche motor cases when used for racing.

    Leave a comment:


  • turboglenn
    replied
    I must admit i love the Time-serts, i've used them a few times back at the porsche shop. The main reason i say heli-coil is because they are the easiest to find and a bit cheaper when you want to do 5-10 holes. like i said on an aluminum head i prefer to do all the exhaust mani holes and then use studs instead of bolts for the final product. Then i use Jet-Loc nuts most of the time to ensure i'm not tightening the turbo mani every 2 track days or so.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X