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Making a Fuel cell.

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  • Making a Fuel cell.

    i just purchased my new miller 252, it has straight CO2 gas and i use it mainly on steel.

    i am looking into making a fuel cell for my jeep and was questioning making one out of aluminum or steel. i do not have aargon or a spoolgun so aluminum would take me on a ride to get one or borrow some one elses.

    i just want what ever input you guys have. like why steel wont work. i know its heavier. the cell will be a simple rectangle all except the bottom will have a sump. i plan on doin baffles or foam but not sure on which. i know their are some on the market for cheep but i can not find one that fits just right.

    lets hear some advice

  • #2
    I think weight is the main drawback. I've seen them made from stainless steel which is heavy. If weight isn't a factor I don't see why steel wouldn't work.

    Comment


    • #3
      Steel has been used for fuel tanks forever. Its not going to look as cool. In my opinion cool looks mean nothing as far as function is concerned.

      Id stay away from foam. Ive heard way too many stories about it coming apart and plugging the rest of the fuel system.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Flyingpig View Post
        Steel has been used for fuel tanks forever. Its not going to look as cool. In my opinion cool looks mean nothing as far as function is concerned.

        Id stay away from foam. Ive heard way too many stories about it coming apart and plugging the rest of the fuel system.
        so have i... i am thinking baffles.

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        • #5
          looks like steel it is, dont forget to post us up some pic's when you get done.

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          • #6
            Are you planning on a cell or a tank? A cell has an inner containment bladder of some type and an outer protective shell. Steel has a better elongation and puncture resistance than aluminum. I am a nut about building road race cars light weight and still will only use steel outer shells. You can get bladders in many off the shelf sizes and can also have them made to order. (made to order are nuts $$$)
            I am a fan of the foam for anti slosh. Easy to install and remove and works well. Be sure to use the right foam for the fuel you use and to replace it as needed. It is not expensive or hard to inspect and replace. Pulling all the foam out makes the cell easy to clean too.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Vicegrip View Post
              Are you planning on a cell or a tank? A cell has an inner containment bladder of some type and an outer protective shell. Steel has a better elongation and puncture resistance than aluminum. I am a nut about building road race cars light weight and still will only use steel outer shells. You can get bladders in many off the shelf sizes and can also have them made to order. (made to order are nuts $$$)
              I am a fan of the foam for anti slosh. Easy to install and remove and works well. Be sure to use the right foam for the fuel you use and to replace it as needed. It is not expensive or hard to inspect and replace. Pulling all the foam out makes the cell easy to clean too.
              not all cells are built with internal bladders... tho many do. not all.

              i decided to make it out of 16 ga. steel and it will have a angled bottom for less fuel starvation. it will have a inner frame that i will plate then fill with preasure and check for leaks. then i will seal the inside with por15 and make a sending unit ring. goin to the metal yard tomorrow. ill post pics as i do it.

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              • #8
                I'd like to see the pics as you go. I have a fuel cell build in my future. It'll be aluminum. I'm leaning toward baffles instead of foam. I may switch to alcohol sometime down the road.

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                • #9
                  it will be alot like this one. i got side tracked and worked on the bike all yesterday so it looks like next tues ill go to the metal yard lol. and im not ganna coat it. but i am usin baffles and no foam





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                  • #10
                    started on the fuel cell. lookin good and the seal looks nice but i will also re weld on the back side then im ganna grind back smooth... questionin on makein a thin angle iron outer skelatin... just for one more layer of seal plus im thinkin t would look pretty bling.... plus add some strength

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                    • #11
                      progress... makin sure theirs no way it will leak




                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mean_Green View Post
                        not all cells are built with internal bladders... tho many do. not all.

                        i decided to make it out of 16 ga. steel and it will have a angled bottom for less fuel starvation. it will have a inner frame that i will plate then fill with preasure and check for leaks. then i will seal the inside with por15 and make a sending unit ring. goin to the metal yard tomorrow. ill post pics as i do it.
                        Not to nit pick but if it does not have a flexable liner it is a fuel tank. From Wiki. "A racing fuel cell is a fuel container that differs from an ordinary fuel tank in the following ways: It has a flexible inner liner to minimize the potential for punctures in the event of a collision or other mishap resulting in serious damage to the vehicle. It is filled with an open-cell foam core to prevent explosion of vapor in the empty portion of the tank and to minimize sloshing of fuel during competition that may unbalance the vehicle or cause inadequate fuel (fuel starvation) delivery to the motor."


                        Rotted foam sucks but bear in mind it is not just for slosh, it slows the progression of a flame front, supressing explosions in less than full fuel cells. Replace the foam every other year in most conditions and it will not rot on you. There is a correct foam for most any fuel used. Cell and foam are not required in many apps. When impact is expected as in most racing they puncture resistant liner and foam are good to have. The liner will prevent a leak if the outer shell is distorted. If distortion is not likely a true cell might not be called for.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not to nit pick but if it does not have a flexable liner it is not a fuel cell

                          Not according to NHRA or SFI (Rule book requires a Jazz #220-015-0 fuel cell for pro stock).

                          http://www.jazproducts.com/pro_drag_fc.html

                          They come with or without foam but no liner.
                          Last edited by pro70z28; 09-14-2008, 07:06 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Just my opinion, the angle will add more weight than strength, and frankly it wouldn't look any better. Also I am not a big fan of grinding welds down smooth, it usually looks more home grown than professional. I would just weld in the baffle with intermittent fillet welds at the 3 sides accessible while the top is still off. Bend a 90 deg angle on the top edge of the baffles so that when you do put the top on you can drill some holes through the top plate and then plug weld to the baffles. This way the baffles are welded to all sides and is very strong. (full length continuous welds are way overkill and only add heat/distortion)

                            The real downside to using carbon steel is rust.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vicegrip View Post
                              Not to nit pick but if it does not have a flexable liner it is a fuel tank. From Wiki. "A racing fuel cell is a fuel container that differs from an ordinary fuel tank in the following ways: It has a flexible inner liner to minimize the potential for punctures in the event of a collision or other mishap resulting in serious damage to the vehicle. It is filled with an open-cell foam core to prevent explosion of vapor in the empty portion of the tank and to minimize sloshing of fuel during competition that may unbalance the vehicle or cause inadequate fuel (fuel starvation) delivery to the motor."


                              Rotted foam sucks but bear in mind it is not just for slosh, it slows the progression of a flame front, supressing explosions in less than full fuel cells. Replace the foam every other year in most conditions and it will not rot on you. There is a correct foam for most any fuel used. Cell and foam are not required in many apps. When impact is expected as in most racing they puncture resistant liner and foam are good to have. The liner will prevent a leak if the outer shell is distorted. If distortion is not likely a true cell might not be called for.
                              thanks for the words. not to get out of line but did you go to college? did you take any classes requiring research? then youll know why they dont let you do research on wiki . not bein mean at all. im assumin you have been to college and will know what i mean when the hamster makes the light go on.

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