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Motorcycle training wheels

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  • Motorcycle training wheels

    Do any of you have a kids motorcycle with training wheels? If so, I would like to know how wide they are. I'm building a set for my kid's bike.

    Thanks

  • #2
    Teach the kids how to ride a bicycle without training wheels first. After that anybody can ride a motorcycle. Ive seen kids riding like that and theyll tip onto the training wheel, let the engine rev, then come back down on the spinning drive wheel(usually looking backwards). Thats when the real problems start. I would avoid the training wheels as a matter of safety.

    Comment


    • #3
      He can ride his bike without training wheels. He had a pretty bad crash on the motorcycle, so I plan on using the training wheels so he can get efficient with the throttle and brake. He's just a bit short for the bike, so I thought this would be a good way to get him started. I don't think he will need them long at all. Also, with the suspension on the bike, he should have 4 wheels on the ground at all times.

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      • #4
        i gotta agree with Flyingpig, i think the training wheel will make it dangerous. throw some pad's on him and let him at it.life is full of lil bump's, he will get the hang of it fast enough, just stay slow till he dose (easyer said then done.)

        Comment


        • #5
          Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. Motorcycles, when on two wheels, use "counter steering" to turn. This means you actually turn away from the direction you want to go. But when a motorcycle has three wheels (training wheels or a side car) they actually steer like a car...turn into the direction you want to go. Therefore as a motorcycle (or a bicycles) shifts back and forth between two and three wheels, the bike is constantly changing direction. This might be OK on a bicycle that doesn't go very fast, but on any size motorcycle, it a disaster. Many folks have been killed with sidecar rigs, going around a corner with three wheels on the ground and suddenly you "fly the car" and lift the sidecar wheel. The motorcycle immediately reverts to counter steer and you cross the yellow line and have a head-on with oncoming traffic.

          No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly IMO

          Comment


          • #6
            rbertalotto interesting comment on how bikes vs cars steer. Sort of makes sense but I'm just not visuallizing the mechanics of it right now. I undersatnd the concept however. I used to run an 80K articulated loader occasionally and it always took me a bit to get used to the steering after not running it for quite a while. You turned the wheel to go right but your body would turn left at first ( you were sitting behind the pivot ) It would take a bit to stop reacting to the "wrong" visual input. When you least expected it, say in a panic situation where someone pulled out in front of you, you would instintively try to correct for what your eyes were telling you was wrong when turning and try to turn back the other way.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by David_D. View Post
              He had a pretty bad crash on the motorcycle.....
              Originally posted by rbertalotto View Post
              Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. <snip>
              No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly. IMO
              I agree with everything Flyingpig and Rbertalotto said.
              FWIW: I've been riding almost 40 years.
              Last edited by Craig in Denver; 06-25-2008, 11:43 AM.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by rbertalotto View Post
                Training wheels are a bad idea on a motorcycle. Motorcycles, when on two wheels, use "counter steering" to turn. This means you actually turn away from the direction you want to go. But when a motorcycle has three wheels (training wheels or a side car) they actually steer like a car...turn into the direction you want to go. Therefore as a motorcycle (or a bicycles) shifts back and forth between two and three wheels, the bike is constantly changing direction. This might be OK on a bicycle that doesn't go very fast, but on any size motorcycle, it a disaster. Many folks have been killed with sidecar rigs, going around a corner with three wheels on the ground and suddenly you "fly the car" and lift the sidecar wheel. The motorcycle immediately reverts to counter steer and you cross the yellow line and have a head-on with oncoming traffic.

                No child should be on a motorcycle that can't handle a bicycle perfectly IMO
                I doubt he'll be crossing the Yellow Line riding in the dirt or dealing with Counter steering

                Of course I'm assuming he is adding Training wheels to a little 50cc Dirt Bike - I mean who would add training wheels to a street bike

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DSW View Post
                  rbertalotto interesting comment on how bikes vs cars steer. Sort of makes sense but I'm just not visuallizing the mechanics of it right now. I undersatnd the concept however. I used to run an 80K articulated loader occasionally and it always took me a bit to get used to the steering after not running it for quite a while. You turned the wheel to go right but your body would turn left at first ( you were sitting behind the pivot ) It would take a bit to stop reacting to the "wrong" visual input. When you least expected it, say in a panic situation where someone pulled out in front of you, you would instintively try to correct for what your eyes were telling you was wrong when turning and try to turn back the other way.
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countersteering


                  Enjoy

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                  • #10
                    Here is some motorcycle training wheels I saw in Daytona Memorial weekend and this is not for me but the lady riding it was pretty
                    Hmm, I was going to show them as an attachment but it won't let me ?
                    I tried.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      David, what bike is it?

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                      • #12
                        http://mtcvoyager.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Reply message for motorcycle training wheels

                          Originally posted by David_D. View Post
                          Do any of you have a kids motorcycle with training wheels? If so, I would like to know how wide they are. I'm building a set for my kid's bike.

                          Thanks
                          I have made up training wheels for my grandsons electric motorbike , which travels at speeds of up to 40 kiometers a hour. The 6 " wheels are mounted on a 19 1/2 " wide crossbar which is bolted under the motorcycle frame with a U -bolt on each side of the frame. The crossbar is 1/4 " flat bar X 2 1/2" wide. The ends of the crossbar are bent downwards at 90 degrees , with a hole for a 1/2 " bolt which goes through the wheel hub and is fastened with flat washers and a locknut. The 6 " wheel has bearings in the hub [ bought at Canadian Tire -- lawnmower wheels. This outfit of mine is still straight , and not bent yet after all the abuse it gets from the youngster driving his bike over all terain at full speed. There you go for training wheels for a motorcycle !---------------------------------

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Further proof people with debate any subject to death!

                            Anyway, here is the answer to the question that you asked: Axle is 28" wide. A 10" diameter air-filled tire sits outboard of the measurment I gave so that means the entire set-up is about 36" wide. The axle is 1/2 material (I would go at least 5/8 if I were making it). My daughter rides with this set-up. She is big for a 4 year old. The bike is a Honda 50 with adjustable throttle so I have it dialed down to limit the danger and my running. Here is the most important part of the message if you are still reading: The guys selling these on the internet say that they bolt right up (they do) and don't affect anything (total Bull Sh*t). The axle WILL interfere with the rear brake lever and limit or prevent safe usage of the rear brake. To correct this, I took a piece of 5/8 rod and welded it to the bottom of the axle where it travels under the brake lever. Then I ground out a notch in the actual axle allowing the brake lever to follow its proper travel without limitation. I don't have full travel of the lever, but you can adjust the drum brake at the wheel to take up some slack and have a rear brake again.
                            Have fun.

                            PS. I like the post on counter-steer.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Check this site out for ideas...

                              http://www.wheels4tots.com/

                              The speeds at which these bikes will be traveling makes it unlikely that they will counter steer anyways. I would also look into getting a remote kill switch rather than chasing a runaway xr50.

                              John

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