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Antique floor jack

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  • Antique floor jack

    I was at Napa the other day and almost bought a new floor jack. $99 for a 2 1/4 ton thats not guaranteed to stay up, $190 for a top line 2 ton and about $350 for the 3 ton. I was debating over the 2 ton and 2 1/4 ton and leaning toward the $99 2 1/4 ton when I reconsidered and decided to just keep using my old jack.
    I thought you guys might get a kick out of it. The patent date on it is Dec 5 1922. Its all mechanical.

    The first pic is the whole jack.
    The next pic is the foot peddle that shoots the centerpost up to take up the slack space as seen in the third pic. Kick the foot peddle the other way and the centerpost falls.
    The last pic is in the razed position.

    Nice thing about this jack is it can never bleed off, and its been working great for 80 years. Its also rated higher than the hydraulic jacks I was interested in, 5000 lb (2 1/2 ton)
    Its only drawbacks are limited lift hight, sometimes its hard to lift the handle high enough to catch the next cog when its under the truck, and its big and awkward.
    Hope you enjoy the pictures.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by burninbriar; 06-07-2008, 03:26 PM.

  • #2
    Have never saw one like that but looks like it has survived very well. No seals to leak & tried & proven. Pretty hard to beat that,simplicity & dependable too. Has that been in the family since new or did you get it at a sale or somewhere. Now you can take the money you saved there & buy a different tool for the shop. Thanks for sharing.

    Comment


    • #3
      I picked it up at an estate auction a long time ago, but I still remember what I paid for it, $2.50.
      I couldn't believe that I was the only bidder. Believe me, its more than paid for itself over the years.
      Its fun when someone sees me pulling it out and asks, "What the hay is that thing". but they are always impressed when they see it work. Its amazingly fast.

      Comment


      • #4
        I love neet old tools like that. Thanks for the picts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks for sharing.
          I love old tools and have quite a collection myself.
          I like them because they're built to last, are easy to fix, and look real neat, too.

          The jack I use at home was my dad's old Walker. I finally got it! It's not as old as your living fossil, but it's at least 40 years old and has seen a LOT of work in its day.

          Great pics. Now I want one.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
            The jack I use at home was my dad's old Walker. I finally got it! It's not as old as your living fossil, but it's at least 40 years old and has seen a LOT of work in its day.
            Mine is also a Walker. Model 720, they call it a Roll-A-Car.

            Comment


            • #7
              cool jack.
              i have one of the newer ones and reach is still a problem when jacking as well as how high it will go. i built a platform to set uit on as it weould just sink in the dirt without the base i made and use a few 2x6 bolcks to help it go high enough to lift my truck. so even after the $125 i spent on it i still have to drag a bundle of home made stuff to use it.
              stick with the old one, gets the job done and will do so for ever.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by chris***@sbcglo View Post
                The jack I use at home was my dad's old Walker. I finally got it! It's not as old as your living fossil, but it's at least 40 years old and has seen a LOT of work in its day.

                Great pics. Now I want one.
                Originally posted by fun4now View Post
                cool jack.
                i have one of the newer ones and reach is still a problem when jacking as well as how high it will go. i built a platform to set uit on as it weould just sink in the dirt without the base i made and use a few 2x6 bolcks to help it go high enough to lift my truck.
                How about throwing some pics of your jacks on here. I'd like to see them. I really like old tools myself.
                Speaking of old stuff, I'll be making a new thread as soon as I get the dates confirmed for the vintage grand prix coming up in july.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by burninbriar View Post
                  How about throwing some pics of your jacks on here. I'd like to see them.
                  Here are some pics of my Walker. Not very interesting next to yours, but it is a smooth operator. I keep the handle out of it so my boy doesn't knock himself in the noggin'.

                  The floorjack I use in my studio is the one my father gave to me about 25 years ago for a b-day present. Not sure of the make, but it works great.
                  Attached Files

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It does seem all the old floor jacks work better than the new ones. Funny how some have never been resealed and still dont leak, buy a new one and it leaks almost right away.

                    Thanks for the pics, I like old tools

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by HMW View Post
                      It does seem all the old floor jacks work better than the new ones. Funny how some have never been resealed and still dont leak, buy a new one and it leaks almost right away.

                      Thanks for the pics, I like old tools
                      Thats the difference between the $100 and $200 Napa models. The $200 model is guaranteed not to bleed off and the $100 model isn't.
                      That is the one really nice thing about mine, being all mechanical, it can never bleed off.

                      Thanks for the extra pics Chris, I wonder if Walker is still making floor jacks and what the quality is if they do?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        cool pictures & it's nice to see old tools kept in service
                        rather than turned into razor blades

                        i wonder if there's a (small? not-so-small?) business to be had
                        by making new old tools like that?

                        f

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by burninbriar View Post
                          I wonder if Walker is still making floor jacks and what the quality is if they do?
                          Walker, bought by Lincoln / Blackhawk still make them pretty much like this today. I've rebuilt MANY of them and own one myself. Pick one up at an auction if it isn't too rusty and then order a rebuild kit on-line. It will out live you. I've rebuilt ones older than me many times, some buried for years in dirt. Best jacks you'll ever find, then and now.

                          They sold these under the Snap-On name with a slightly bigger frame with a 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 ton rating. Chris' is the 1-1/2 to 2 ton power unit, but it can push a bit more. I like the newer ones like Chris' with the removable handle, but I rebuilt and gave the father-in-law an older one with the 'T' handle (non-removable) for Christmas one year and he loves it better.

                          OLD Walkers are really cool. The 20 to 50 ton units are HUGE.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            And if you read the dirctions correctly you would never depend on the floor jack to hold anyting up while you crawled under and would use it to jack only, support with floor stands for the weight. To many people have been killed depending on hydraulics. Use proper blocking and not just the jack.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              good point. i always pop in my jack stands as soon as i get it to the hight i want it at. i have not noticed my jack leaking off presser as of yet, but don't want to find out the hard way. especially with the way all the new cr ap is made these days.

                              Comment

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